Agriculture
Seeds of the Future
Middle school science adventures
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Toads
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
Roach Love Songs
Stunts for High-Diving Ants
Young Ants in the Kitchen
Behavior
The case of the headless ant
Flower family knows its roots
The Smell of Trust
Birds
Storks
Roadrunners
Seagulls
Chemistry and Materials
A Light Delay
Diamond Glow
Watching out for vultures
Computers
Batteries built by Viruses
A Classroom of the Mind
Hubble trouble doubled
Dinosaurs and Fossils
The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs
The bug that may have killed a dinosaur
Meet the new dinos
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Rocking the House
Petrified Lightning
Drilling Deep for Fuel
Environment
Shrinking Fish
Forests as a Tsunami Shield
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Finding the Past
Salt and Early Civilization
Meet your mysterious relative
A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?
Fish
Catfish
Seahorses
Flashlight Fishes
Food and Nutrition
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
The Essence of Celery
Recipe for Health
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Whoever vs. Whomever
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
Play for Science
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
Prime Time for Cicadas
Human Body
Tapeworms and Drug Delivery
A Sour Taste in Your Mouth
Sea Kids See Clearly Underwater
Invertebrates
Octopuses
Lice
Insects
Mammals
Bobcats
Hares
Weasels and Kin
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
How children learn
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Electric Backpack
The Particle Zoo
One ring around them all
Plants
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Springing forward
Flower family knows its roots
Reptiles
Cobras
Komodo Dragons
Lizards
Space and Astronomy
Sun Flips Out to Flip-Flop
Return to Space
The two faces of Mars
Technology and Engineering
Dancing with Robots
Riding Sunlight
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Charged cars that would charge
Where rivers run uphill
Robots on the Road, Again
Weather
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Arctic Melt
Watering the Air
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Zooming In on the Wild Sun

When you watch the sun set, it looks like a smooth, orange circle sinking below the horizon. But the sun turns out to be a much wilder place when you take a closer look. The sun's surface is covered with massive, bumpy structures called granules. Made of incredibly hot gas, each granule is the size of Texas and lasts for about 6 to 10 minutes. The granules are always changing shape, disappearing, and reappearing on the sun's chaotic surface. Using a special telescope for looking at the sun, scientists have now taken the most detailed pictures of these granules so far. The pictures show that the granules are covered with canyons and plateaus: billions of giant Grand Canyons with walls up to 100 kilometers tall. The sun goes through a pattern of changes every 11 years, including a period when it is covered with dark patches called sunspots. You might think the sun would be a little dimmer during this phase—but instead, it gets brighter. Scientists know this is because of very bright structures, called faculae, found among the granules. Faculae is Latin for "little torches." Most scientists think the faculae are big tubes sunken into the sun's surface, like a rabbit's burrows. But in the new images, the faculae look like enormous walls. The more scientists learn about these faculae and other structures on the sun’s surface, the better they will understand how the sun's brightness changes over the years. This is important because even tiny changes in brightness might affect Earth's climate. Our wild sun may be modifying temperatures on our planet just enough to give us a few centuries worth of cooler or warmer weather.—S. McDonagh Caution: Never look at the sun directly. Permanent eye damage can also result from looking at the disk of the sun through a camera viewfinder, with binoculars, or with a telescope.

Zooming In on the Wild Sun
Zooming In on the Wild Sun








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