Agriculture
Springing forward
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
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Tree Frogs
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Polar Bears in Trouble
Insects Take a Breather
Little Beetle, Big Horns
Behavior
Why Cats Nap and Whales Snooze
Body clocks
Lost Sight, Found Sound
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Peafowl
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Chemistry and Materials
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Sugary Survival Skill
Butterfly Wings and Waterproof Coats
Computers
Galaxies on the go
A Light Delay
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Dinosaurs and Fossils
An Ancient Spider's Web
Dinosaur Dig
A Big, Weird Dino
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Plastic-munching microbes
Ancient Heights
Environment
Acid Snails
Island Extinctions
Where rivers run uphill
Finding the Past
Childhood's Long History
Big Woman of the Distant Past
Early Maya Writing
Fish
Electric Catfish
Sturgeons
Freshwater Fish
Food and Nutrition
Strong Bones for Life
Healing Honey
A Taste for Cheese
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
Math of the World
Detecting True Art
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Human Body
A Fix for Injured Knees
Germ Zapper
A Sour Taste in Your Mouth
Invertebrates
Sea Urchin
Mussels
Octopuses
Mammals
Cape Buffalo
Sun Bear
African Leopards
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Children and Media
Physics
Invisibility Ring
IceCube Science
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Plants
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Nature's Alphabet
Reptiles
Rattlesnakes
Pythons
Crocodiles
Space and Astronomy
Evidence of a Wet Mars
Solving a Sedna Mystery
Planning for Mars
Technology and Engineering
Bionic Bacteria
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Smart Windows
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Charged cars that would charge
Weather
Earth's Poles in Peril
A Dire Shortage of Water
Warmest Year on Record
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Zooming In on the Wild Sun

When you watch the sun set, it looks like a smooth, orange circle sinking below the horizon. But the sun turns out to be a much wilder place when you take a closer look. The sun's surface is covered with massive, bumpy structures called granules. Made of incredibly hot gas, each granule is the size of Texas and lasts for about 6 to 10 minutes. The granules are always changing shape, disappearing, and reappearing on the sun's chaotic surface. Using a special telescope for looking at the sun, scientists have now taken the most detailed pictures of these granules so far. The pictures show that the granules are covered with canyons and plateaus: billions of giant Grand Canyons with walls up to 100 kilometers tall. The sun goes through a pattern of changes every 11 years, including a period when it is covered with dark patches called sunspots. You might think the sun would be a little dimmer during this phase—but instead, it gets brighter. Scientists know this is because of very bright structures, called faculae, found among the granules. Faculae is Latin for "little torches." Most scientists think the faculae are big tubes sunken into the sun's surface, like a rabbit's burrows. But in the new images, the faculae look like enormous walls. The more scientists learn about these faculae and other structures on the sun’s surface, the better they will understand how the sun's brightness changes over the years. This is important because even tiny changes in brightness might affect Earth's climate. Our wild sun may be modifying temperatures on our planet just enough to give us a few centuries worth of cooler or warmer weather.—S. McDonagh Caution: Never look at the sun directly. Permanent eye damage can also result from looking at the disk of the sun through a camera viewfinder, with binoculars, or with a telescope.

Zooming In on the Wild Sun
Zooming In on the Wild Sun








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