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Seeds of the Future
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Ultrasonic Frogs Raise the Pitch
A Microbe Nanny for Young Wasps
Koalas, Up Close and Personal
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Seeing red means danger ahead
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When frog gender flips
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Wave of Destruction
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Power of the Wind
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A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?
Traces of Ancient Campfires
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Sponges' secret weapon
The Essence of Celery
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Who vs. Whom
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Preparing for the GSAT Exam
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
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Detecting True Art
Human Body
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African Wildedbeest
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Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
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Dreams of Floating in Space
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Gaining a Swift Lift
Plants
Flower family knows its roots
Getting the dirt on carbon
Farms sprout in cities
Reptiles
Sea Turtles
Komodo Dragons
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Space and Astronomy
Planning for Mars
Baby Star
Zooming In on the Wild Sun
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Toy Challenge
Supersuits for Superheroes
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
The Parts of Speech
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What is a Preposition?
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Transportation
Robots on a Rocky Road
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
How to Fly Like a Bat
Weather
Where rivers run uphill
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Warmest Year on Record
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Zooming In on the Wild Sun

When you watch the sun set, it looks like a smooth, orange circle sinking below the horizon. But the sun turns out to be a much wilder place when you take a closer look. The sun's surface is covered with massive, bumpy structures called granules. Made of incredibly hot gas, each granule is the size of Texas and lasts for about 6 to 10 minutes. The granules are always changing shape, disappearing, and reappearing on the sun's chaotic surface. Using a special telescope for looking at the sun, scientists have now taken the most detailed pictures of these granules so far. The pictures show that the granules are covered with canyons and plateaus: billions of giant Grand Canyons with walls up to 100 kilometers tall. The sun goes through a pattern of changes every 11 years, including a period when it is covered with dark patches called sunspots. You might think the sun would be a little dimmer during this phase—but instead, it gets brighter. Scientists know this is because of very bright structures, called faculae, found among the granules. Faculae is Latin for "little torches." Most scientists think the faculae are big tubes sunken into the sun's surface, like a rabbit's burrows. But in the new images, the faculae look like enormous walls. The more scientists learn about these faculae and other structures on the sun’s surface, the better they will understand how the sun's brightness changes over the years. This is important because even tiny changes in brightness might affect Earth's climate. Our wild sun may be modifying temperatures on our planet just enough to give us a few centuries worth of cooler or warmer weather.—S. McDonagh Caution: Never look at the sun directly. Permanent eye damage can also result from looking at the disk of the sun through a camera viewfinder, with binoculars, or with a telescope.

Zooming In on the Wild Sun
Zooming In on the Wild Sun








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