Agriculture
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Got Milk? How?
Middle school science adventures
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Bullfrogs
Frogs and Toads
Animals
Killer Flatworms Hunt with Poison
Gliders in the Family
Ants on Stilts
Behavior
Why Cats Nap and Whales Snooze
Newly named fish crawls and hops
The Smell of Trust
Birds
Condors
Woodpecker
Blue Jays
Chemistry and Materials
Bandages that could bite back
Getting the dirt on carbon
A Framework for Growing Bone
Computers
Fingerprint Evidence
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Galaxies far, far, far away
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Middle school science adventures
Did Dinosaurs Do Handstands?
Big Fish in Ancient Waters
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Slower Growth, Greater Warmth
Meteorites may have sparked life on Earth
Challenging the Forces of Nature
Environment
Food Web Woes
Swimming with Sharks and Stingrays
The Oily Gulf
Finding the Past
Words of the Distant Past
Oldest Writing in the New World
Sahara Cemetery
Fish
Bass
Salmon
Great White Shark
Food and Nutrition
Food for Life
Symbols from the Stone Age
The Color of Health
GSAT English Rules
Capitalization Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Pronouns
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Exam Preparation
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Monkeys Count
Math is a real brain bender
Human Body
Walking to Exercise the Brain
Cell Phones and Possible Health Hazards
A Long Haul
Invertebrates
Bedbugs
Oysters
Centipedes
Mammals
Chipmunks
Quolls
Giant Panda
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Invisibility Ring
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
One ring around them all
Plants
A Change in Leaf Color
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Seeds of the Future
Reptiles
Anacondas
Garter Snakes
Box Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Super Star Cluster in the Neighborhood
Big Galaxy Swallows Little Galaxy
A Dusty Birthplace
Technology and Engineering
Supersuits for Superheroes
A Clean Getaway
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Reach for the Sky
Robots on a Rocky Road
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Weather
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
A Dire Shortage of Water
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Add your Article

Yaks

The yak (Bos grunniens) is a long-haired humped domestic bovine found in Tibet and throughout the Himalayan region of south central Asia, as well as in Mongolia. In Tibetan, the word yak refers only to the male of the species; a female is a dri or nak. In most languages which borrowed the word, including English, however, yak is usually used for both sexes. A Real Yak: Wild yaks (subspecies B. g. mutus) stand about two meters tall at the shoulder and weigh 1,000 kg (2,200 lb). They usually form groups of between 10 and 30 animals. Domestic yaks are about half that height, usually weighing over 1200 pounds with a lifespan of 20-25 years. Both types have long shaggy hair to insulate them from the cold. Wild yaks can be either brown or black. Domesticated ones can also be white. Both males and females have horns. The word Yak is also used to describe an irritating or disagreeable individual. A Nice Breeze: Wild yaks inhabit treeless uplands like hills, mountains and plateaux between 3,200 m (10,500 ft) and roughly 5,400 m (18,000 ft). They eat grasses, lichens and other plants. During the warmest season these hardy animals live in areas of permanent snow and move lower down at colder times. They are insulated by dense, close, matted under-hair as well as their shaggy outer hair. Beasts of Burden: Domesticated yaks are kept primarily for their milk, fiber, and meat; they are also used as beasts of burden, transporting goods across mountain passes for local farmers and traders as well as in support of climbing and trekking expeditions. Yak milk is often processed to a cheese called chhurpi in Tibetan and Nepali languages, and byaslag in Mongolia. Often the pack animals are actually crossbreeds of the yak and Bos taurus (common domestic cattle). These are known in Tibetan as dzo or dzopkyo. Sewing Machines: Yak fiber is soft and smooth, in several colors, including shades of gray, brown, black and white. The length of yak fiber is about 1.2 inches. It is combed or shed from the yak and then dehaired. The result is a splendid downy fiber that can be spun into yarn for knitting. Unlike cattle, yaks grunt rather than moo. Many wild yaks are killed for food by the Tibetans; they are now an endangered species. More recently, sports involving domesticated yaks, such as yak skiing or yak polo, are being marketed as tourist attractions in Central Asian countries.

Yaks
Yaks








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™