Agriculture
Got Milk? How?
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Amphibians
Newts
Poison Dart Frogs
Salamanders
Animals
No Fair: Monkey Sees, Doesn't
Pothole Repair, Insect-style
A Meal Plan for Birds
Behavior
Listening to Birdsong
Wired for Math
Math is a real brain bender
Birds
Emus
Ospreys
Falcons
Chemistry and Materials
Scientist Profile: Wally Gilbert
Graphene's superstrength
Earth from the inside out
Computers
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Look into My Eyes
A New Look at Saturn's rings
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino Babies
Dinosaur Dig
The man who rocked biology to its core
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Challenging the Forces of Nature
Earth's Poles in Peril
Weird, new ant
Environment
Fishing for Fun Takes Toll
Power of the Wind
Nanosponges Soak Up Pollutants
Finding the Past
Of Lice and Old Clothes
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
An Ancient Childhood
Fish
Sting Ray
White Tip Sharks
Goldfish
Food and Nutrition
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
Strong Bones for Life
Making good, brown fat
GSAT English Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Order of Adjectives
Whoever vs. Whomever
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Mastering The GSAT Exam
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
Human Body
Nature's Medicines
Electricity's Spark of Life
Gut Germs to the Rescue
Invertebrates
Grasshoppers
Bees
Snails
Mammals
Bulldogs
Pitbulls
Miniature Schnauzers
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Electric Backpack
One ring around them all
Gaining a Swift Lift
Plants
A Change in Leaf Color
Nature's Alphabet
Farms sprout in cities
Reptiles
Boa Constrictors
Komodo Dragons
Rattlesnakes
Space and Astronomy
Burst Busters
A Moon's Icy Spray
Gravity Tractor as Asteroid Mover
Technology and Engineering
Young Scientists Take Flight
Bionic Bacteria
A Light Delay
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
Problems with Prepositions
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Flying the Hyper Skies
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Revving Up Green Machines
Weather
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Warmest Year on Record
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Add your Article

World’s largest lizard is venomous too

If you’re looking for a new pet, don’t even think about a Komodo dragon. These reptiles are the world’s largest lizards and can grow to be 10 feet long and weigh more than 300 pounds. (Roughly the weight of two or three eighth-graders.) Komodo dragons run fast and eat almost any kind of meat, including dead animals, other Komodo dragons and people who get too close. “These things are incredible killing machines,” says Bryan Fry, a biologist and expert on animal venom. If those reasons aren’t good enough, consider the bite of a Komodo dragon. According to a new study, it may kill prey like snakes by injecting venom. This chemical, according to Fry and his team of scientists at the University of Melbourne in Australia, can cause shock in the unlucky victim. A person or animal goes into shock when the body cannot deliver enough blood to the organs to keep functioning. As a result, the body starts to shut down. Scientists have only recently begun to understand why a Komodo dragon is so lethal. Some people used to believe that a Komodo dragon’s bite contained bacteria from the mouth that would cause a severe infection in the victim’s blood. The infection would eventually kill the animal, but it could take days. Until then, the Komodo dragon would follow the wounded animal. Fry calls that story a fairy tale. He says that after being bitten by a Komodo dragon, animals usually die quickly. “No one’s actually seen a Komodo dragon track a prey for three days until it dies,” he says. Plus, he says the Komodo dragon’s mouth doesn’t contain more bacteria than other animals in the wild. To study the giant lizards, Fry and his team used a tool called an MRI, which is often used to study diseases in human beings. MRI stands for magnetic resonance imaging. During the MRI procedure, the head of a Komodo dragon was placed in a powerful magnetic field. The magnetic field caused tiny vibrations in the atoms inside the lizard’s head, and the vibrations allowed Fry and his team to take three-dimensional pictures. These pictures showed that the lizard has six venom glands on each side of the lower jaw. Combined, these glands can hold about 1.2 milliliters of venom. “It’s astounding,” Fry says. “It was just jaw dropping when we got the first MRI results.” After more studies, Fry and his team found that the Komodo dragon venom contained some of the same ingredients as snake venom. These ingredients thin the blood and cause blood vessels to become larger — a recipe for shock. To test the venom, the scientists injected rats with it and observed that the rats became still. Fry’s work shows that Komodo dragons kill their prey with venom, and not by germs — and gives us another reason to steer clear of these giant lizards. That should be easy to do, since they live only on a few islands in the tropical country of Indonesia. Power words: (from the Yahoo! Kids Dictionary and Britannica.com) Venom: A poisonous secretion of an animal, such as a snake, spider or scorpion, usually transmitted by a bite or sting. shock: A potentially fatal physiological reaction to a variety of conditions, including illness, injury, hemorrhage and dehydration, usually characterized by marked loss of blood pressure, diminished blood circulation and inadequate blood flow to the tissues. MRI: (magnetic resonance imaging) Three-dimensional imaging technique used to visualize organs and structures inside the body without the need for X-rays or other radiation.

World’s largest lizard is venomous too
World’s largest lizard is venomous too








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™