Agriculture
Getting the dirt on carbon
Springing forward
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Salamanders
Toads
Animals
Glimpses of a Legendary Woodpecker
A Meal Plan for Birds
Crocodile Hearts
Behavior
Why Cats Nap and Whales Snooze
Reading Body Language
Storing Memories before Bedtime
Birds
Kookaburras
Doves
Geese
Chemistry and Materials
Fog Buster
A Framework for Growing Bone
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Computers
Earth from the inside out
Hubble trouble doubled
Graphene's superstrength
Dinosaurs and Fossils
An Ancient Spider's Web
South America's sticky tar pits
Tiny Pterodactyl
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Meteorites may have sparked life on Earth
Killer Space Rock Snuffed Out Ancient Life
Watering the Air
Environment
Toxic Cleanups Get a Microbe Boost
Pollution Detective
Watching for Wildfires in Yellowstone
Finding the Past
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
Words of the Distant Past
Childhood's Long History
Fish
Basking Sharks
Lungfish
Sturgeons
Food and Nutrition
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
The Essence of Celery
Healing Honey
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Problems with Prepositions
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Scholarship
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Prime Time for Cicadas
Human Body
Nature's Medicines
A Sour Taste in Your Mouth
A New Touch
Invertebrates
Arachnids
Roundworms
Squid
Mammals
Manatees
Flying Foxes
Pomeranians
Parents
Children and Media
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Black Hole Journey
Powering Ball Lightning
Plants
Getting the dirt on carbon
Farms sprout in cities
Making the most of a meal
Reptiles
Snapping Turtles
Crocodilians
Boa Constrictors
Space and Astronomy
Black Holes That Burp
A Moon's Icy Spray
A Family in Space
Technology and Engineering
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
What is a Verb?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Robots on a Rocky Road
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Revving Up Green Machines
Weather
Watering the Air
Recipe for a Hurricane
A Change in Climate
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Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse

Planet-watchers, take note. A rare event is coming to the sky next week. On Tuesday, June 8, Venus will cross in front of the sun for the first time since 1882, as seen from Earth. But don't try to watch it with your unprotected eyes. Staring at the sun can cause serious damage. If you have access to the right kind of equipment, though, and you're in the right place at the right time, the planet will look like a black dot drifting across the sun's surface. The event, called a transit, will last about 6 hours. In the eastern United States, people will be able to see only the last 90 minutes of the event. Europe will be a much better place to witness this momentous occasion. Better yet, anyone can watch it happen on the Internet. The transit will begin at about 12:30 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time (EDT) and end at about 6:30 a.m. EDT. From 12 a.m. to 7 a.m. EDT, the Norwegian Astronomical Association will Webcast the event from a few places in Norway at www.astronomy.no/. You can also go to the Web site www.exploratorium.edu/venus/ (Exploratorium). From 1 a.m. EDT to 7 a.m. EDT, a crew from the Exploratorium science museum in San Francisco will send images from Greece. If you live in a place where the transit will be visible, you can try watching it by allowing sunlight to shine through a pinhole onto a piece of paper. Look down at the paper, not up at the sky, to watch Venus cross the sun's face. It's worth finding some way to experience the event. Venus will cross in front of the sun only one more time this century—in the year 2012.—E. Sohn

Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse
Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse








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