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Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Fast-flying fungal spores
Watching out for vultures
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Newts
Bullfrogs
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A Butterfly's New Green Glow
A Fallout Feast for Crabs
Monkey Math
Behavior
When Darwin got sick of feathers
Mice sense each other's fear
Math Naturals
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Quails
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Geese
Chemistry and Materials
Lighting goes digital
Salt secrets
The Taste of Bubbles
Computers
Galaxies far, far, far away
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Supersonic Splash
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From Mammoth to Modern Elephant
A Dino King's Ancestor
Fingerprinting Fossils
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Pollution at the ends of the Earth
Giving Sharks Safe Homes
A Volcano Wakes Up
Environment
A 'Book' on Every Living Thing
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Sounds and Silence
Finding the Past
Big Woman of the Distant Past
Early Maya Writing
An Ancient Childhood
Fish
Sturgeons
Mako Sharks
Lampreys
Food and Nutrition
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
The mercury in that tuna
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Problems with Prepositions
Whoever vs. Whomever
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Human Body
Heart Revival
Sea Kids See Clearly Underwater
Gut Germs to the Rescue
Invertebrates
Daddy Long Legs
Starfish
Grasshoppers
Mammals
Scottish Folds
Boxers
Oxen
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Children and Media
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Gaining a Swift Lift
One ring around them all
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Plants
Fastest Plant on Earth
Surprise Visitor
The algae invasion
Reptiles
Caimans
Anacondas
Copperhead Snakes
Space and Astronomy
Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse
Planets on the Edge
Phantom Energy and the Big Rip
Technology and Engineering
Musclebots Take Some Steps
A Satellite of Your Own
Machine Copy
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Noun
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Reach for the Sky
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Weather
Recipe for a Hurricane
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
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Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse

Planet-watchers, take note. A rare event is coming to the sky next week. On Tuesday, June 8, Venus will cross in front of the sun for the first time since 1882, as seen from Earth. But don't try to watch it with your unprotected eyes. Staring at the sun can cause serious damage. If you have access to the right kind of equipment, though, and you're in the right place at the right time, the planet will look like a black dot drifting across the sun's surface. The event, called a transit, will last about 6 hours. In the eastern United States, people will be able to see only the last 90 minutes of the event. Europe will be a much better place to witness this momentous occasion. Better yet, anyone can watch it happen on the Internet. The transit will begin at about 12:30 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time (EDT) and end at about 6:30 a.m. EDT. From 12 a.m. to 7 a.m. EDT, the Norwegian Astronomical Association will Webcast the event from a few places in Norway at www.astronomy.no/. You can also go to the Web site www.exploratorium.edu/venus/ (Exploratorium). From 1 a.m. EDT to 7 a.m. EDT, a crew from the Exploratorium science museum in San Francisco will send images from Greece. If you live in a place where the transit will be visible, you can try watching it by allowing sunlight to shine through a pinhole onto a piece of paper. Look down at the paper, not up at the sky, to watch Venus cross the sun's face. It's worth finding some way to experience the event. Venus will cross in front of the sun only one more time this century—in the year 2012.—E. Sohn

Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse
Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse








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