Agriculture
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Making the most of a meal
Amphibians
Toads
Frogs and Toads
Newts
Animals
Insect Stowaways
Koalas, Up Close and Personal
Professor Ant
Behavior
Monkeys in the Mirror
Newly named fish crawls and hops
Video Game Violence
Birds
Rheas
Quails
Carnivorous Birds
Chemistry and Materials
A Framework for Growing Bone
Gooey Secrets of Mussel Power
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
Computers
Troubles with Hubble
The Book of Life
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Watery Fate for Nature's Gliders
Digging Dinos
Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Meteorites may have sparked life on Earth
Earth's Poles in Peril
Sky Dust Keeps Falling on Your Head
Environment
Missing Tigers in India
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Power of the Wind
Finding the Past
Chicken of the Sea
Salt and Early Civilization
Ancient Cave Behavior
Fish
Trout
Puffer Fish
Nurse Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
The mercury in that tuna
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Who vs. That vs. Which
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
Mastering The GSAT Exam
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
Deep-space dancers
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Human Body
Prime Time for Broken Bones
Don't Eat That Sandwich!
Nature's Medicines
Invertebrates
Ants
Clams
Sea Anemones
Mammals
Rhinoceros
Aardvarks
Prairie Dogs
Parents
Children and Media
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
IceCube Science
Electric Backpack
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Plants
Assembling the Tree of Life
Underwater Jungles
Bright Blooms That Glow
Reptiles
Garter Snakes
Anacondas
Komodo Dragons
Space and Astronomy
Intruder Alert: Sweeping Space for Dust
Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse
A Dead Star's Dusty Ring
Technology and Engineering
Dancing with Robots
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
Young Scientists Take Flight
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Pronouns
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Where rivers run uphill
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Weather
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Where rivers run uphill
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Add your Article

Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse

Planet-watchers, take note. A rare event is coming to the sky next week. On Tuesday, June 8, Venus will cross in front of the sun for the first time since 1882, as seen from Earth. But don't try to watch it with your unprotected eyes. Staring at the sun can cause serious damage. If you have access to the right kind of equipment, though, and you're in the right place at the right time, the planet will look like a black dot drifting across the sun's surface. The event, called a transit, will last about 6 hours. In the eastern United States, people will be able to see only the last 90 minutes of the event. Europe will be a much better place to witness this momentous occasion. Better yet, anyone can watch it happen on the Internet. The transit will begin at about 12:30 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time (EDT) and end at about 6:30 a.m. EDT. From 12 a.m. to 7 a.m. EDT, the Norwegian Astronomical Association will Webcast the event from a few places in Norway at www.astronomy.no/. You can also go to the Web site www.exploratorium.edu/venus/ (Exploratorium). From 1 a.m. EDT to 7 a.m. EDT, a crew from the Exploratorium science museum in San Francisco will send images from Greece. If you live in a place where the transit will be visible, you can try watching it by allowing sunlight to shine through a pinhole onto a piece of paper. Look down at the paper, not up at the sky, to watch Venus cross the sun's face. It's worth finding some way to experience the event. Venus will cross in front of the sun only one more time this century—in the year 2012.—E. Sohn

Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse
Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™