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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
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Earth's Poles in Peril
Undersea Vent System Active for Ages
Warmest Year on Record
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To Catch a Dragonfly
A 'Book' on Every Living Thing
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A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?
Little People Cause Big Surprise
Chicken of the Sea
Fish
Electric Eel
Barracudas
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In Search of the Perfect French Fry
Eat Out, Eat Smart
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
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GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
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GSAT Exam Preparation
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Scholarship
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Math of the World
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
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A Better Flu Shot
Football Scrapes and Nasty Infections
A Fix for Injured Knees
Invertebrates
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Earthworms
Camel Spiders
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African Leopards
Hoofed Mammals
Marmots
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Plants
Nature's Alphabet
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Fast-flying fungal spores
Reptiles
Chameleons
Garter Snakes
Cobras
Space and Astronomy
Phantom Energy and the Big Rip
A Great Ball of Fire
World of Three Suns
Technology and Engineering
Riding Sunlight
Beyond Bar Codes
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
How to Fly Like a Bat
Flying the Hyper Skies
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Weather
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
A Change in Climate
Warmest Year on Record
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Who's Knocking?

Is it, or isn't it? That's been the question on every bird-lover's lips since April, when scientists announced that the ivory-billed woodpecker is still alive (see "Glimpses of a Legendary Woodpecker"). For the past 60 years, many experts supposed that the bird was extinct. Even after the recent rediscovery, some have refused to believe the reports. Researchers from Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, placed digital sound recorders at more than 150 spots in the woodlands of Arkansas and left them there for weeks. In all, they collected about 18,000 hours of sound. Within the recordings, the Cornell scientists hear what they say could be the ivory-billed woodpecker's distinctive sharp calls, which sound like "kent." The recorders also picked up several dozen examples of a double-knocking sound, typical of the way an ivory-billed woodpecker is supposed to drum on a tree. On the lab's Web site (www.birds.cornell.edu/ivory/), the scientists have posted the new recordings, along with recordings from the 1930s. Computer analyses show that the recent calls are very similar to the 1930s sounds, which definitely come from ivory-billed woodpeckers. You can listen to the recordings, compare the sounds, and decide for yourself. Critics who challenged the first claims (which included seven sightings and 4 seconds of blurry video footage) have been more accepting of the new sound recordings. Still, doubts remain. The bird in the original video looks like a pileated, not ivory-billed, woodpecker to some people. Moreover, the sounds are not complete proof by themselves, the Cornell scientists say. Several people bird-watching in the Arkansas woods have said that blue jays there sometimes make an odd tooting sound. The recorded calls sound a little like them. To check this, the Cornell team plans to record blue jay calls in Arkansas. So far, there's no proof that will satisfy everyone. The only clincher, it seems, will be a clear, close-up photograph. Somebody still needs to take that picture.E. Sohn

Who's Knocking?
Who's Knocking?








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