Agriculture
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Getting the dirt on carbon
Amphibians
Newts
Poison Dart Frogs
Salamanders
Animals
Roboroach and Company
Mating Slows Down Prairie Dogs
Young Ants in the Kitchen
Behavior
Face values
Island of Hope
Baby Number Whizzes
Birds
Tropical Birds
Robins
Blue Jays
Chemistry and Materials
Watching out for vultures
Lighting goes digital
A Diamond Polish for Ancient Tools
Computers
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Look into My Eyes
Earth from the inside out
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Watery Fate for Nature's Gliders
Message in a dinosaur's teeth
Meet the new dinos
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Less Mixing Can Affect Lake's Ecosystem
Pollution at the ends of the Earth
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
Environment
Spotty Survival
A Newspaper's Hidden Cost
Where rivers run uphill
Finding the Past
Sahara Cemetery
Big Woman of the Distant Past
Early Maya Writing
Fish
Codfish
Megamouth Sharks
Sturgeons
Food and Nutrition
Packing Fat
The Color of Health
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
GSAT English Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Who vs. Whom
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
Monkeys Count
Math Naturals
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Human Body
Taking the sting out of scorpion venom
Don't Eat That Sandwich!
Disease Detectives
Invertebrates
Leeches
Fleas
Flatworms
Mammals
African Warthogs
Blue Bear
Echidnas
Parents
How children learn
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Electric Backpack
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Plants
Making the most of a meal
Assembling the Tree of Life
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Reptiles
Crocodilians
Snakes
Komodo Dragons
Space and Astronomy
Solving a Sedna Mystery
Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse
Rover Makes Splash on Mars
Technology and Engineering
Young Scientists Take Flight
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
Sugar Power for Cell Phones
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Pronouns
Transportation
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Where rivers run uphill
How to Fly Like a Bat
Weather
A Dire Shortage of Water
Catching Some Rays
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Add your Article

Who's Knocking?

Is it, or isn't it? That's been the question on every bird-lover's lips since April, when scientists announced that the ivory-billed woodpecker is still alive (see "Glimpses of a Legendary Woodpecker"). For the past 60 years, many experts supposed that the bird was extinct. Even after the recent rediscovery, some have refused to believe the reports. Researchers from Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, placed digital sound recorders at more than 150 spots in the woodlands of Arkansas and left them there for weeks. In all, they collected about 18,000 hours of sound. Within the recordings, the Cornell scientists hear what they say could be the ivory-billed woodpecker's distinctive sharp calls, which sound like "kent." The recorders also picked up several dozen examples of a double-knocking sound, typical of the way an ivory-billed woodpecker is supposed to drum on a tree. On the lab's Web site (www.birds.cornell.edu/ivory/), the scientists have posted the new recordings, along with recordings from the 1930s. Computer analyses show that the recent calls are very similar to the 1930s sounds, which definitely come from ivory-billed woodpeckers. You can listen to the recordings, compare the sounds, and decide for yourself. Critics who challenged the first claims (which included seven sightings and 4 seconds of blurry video footage) have been more accepting of the new sound recordings. Still, doubts remain. The bird in the original video looks like a pileated, not ivory-billed, woodpecker to some people. Moreover, the sounds are not complete proof by themselves, the Cornell scientists say. Several people bird-watching in the Arkansas woods have said that blue jays there sometimes make an odd tooting sound. The recorded calls sound a little like them. To check this, the Cornell team plans to record blue jay calls in Arkansas. So far, there's no proof that will satisfy everyone. The only clincher, it seems, will be a clear, close-up photograph. Somebody still needs to take that picture.—E. Sohn

Who's Knocking?
Who's Knocking?








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™