Agriculture
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Got Milk? How?
Watering the Air
Amphibians
Newts
Salamanders and Newts
Toads
Animals
Putting a Mouse on Pause
Monkey Math
Roboroach and Company
Behavior
Longer lives for wild elephants
Storing Memories before Bedtime
How Much Babies Know
Birds
Swans
Lovebirds
Quails
Chemistry and Materials
Big Machine Reveals Small Worlds
A Framework for Growing Bone
Batteries built by Viruses
Computers
Middle school science adventures
New twists for phantom limbs
A New Look at Saturn's rings
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dinosaur Eggs-citement
Digging for Ancient DNA
Meet your mysterious relative
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Recipe for a Hurricane
Easy Ways to Conserve Water
Environment
Toxic Cleanups Get a Microbe Boost
Fungus Hunt
Acid Snails
Finding the Past
The Puzzle of Ancient Mariners
Stone Tablet May Solve Maya Mystery
Big Woman of the Distant Past
Fish
Mako Sharks
Flounder
Saltwater Fish
Food and Nutrition
How Super Are Superfruits?
Chew for Health
Food for Life
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Capitalization Rules
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
Human Body
Music in the Brain
Heavy Sleep
A Better Flu Shot
Invertebrates
Krill
Ticks
Moths
Mammals
Donkeys
Spectacled Bear
Pekingese
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
One ring around them all
Plants
Sweet, Sticky Science
The algae invasion
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Reptiles
Boa Constrictors
Crocodiles
Asp
Space and Astronomy
A Family in Space
Tossing Out a Black Hole Life Preserver
A Darker, Warmer Red Planet
Technology and Engineering
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
Slip Sliming Away
Algae Motors
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Reach for the Sky
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Weather
Arctic Melt
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Add your Article

Watery Fate for Nature's Gliders

Talk about winging it. The albatross is an amazing glider. In windy weather, these ocean birds can stay airborne for hours without flapping their enormous wings. They've been known to follow ships for days to feed on garbage. Today, there are about 17 species of albatross, and they are found only in areas around Antarctica and the northern Pacific Ocean. Scientists know that albatross once soared over the Atlantic, but they've never understood why these birds might have died out—until now. A new fossil discovery made in Bermuda suggests that the Atlantic population of at least one species of albatross, the short-tailed albatross, died out 400,000 years ago. Around this time, a period of global warming caused the polar ice caps to melt, making sea levels rise at least 20 meters. That spelled trouble for the birds. The rising sea level left very little land on Bermuda, reducing the number of places the albatross could nest and breed. Albatross must have nesting sites at high altitudes, and they need strong winds to make their gliding takeoffs and landings. In the Pacific Ocean, there are many more islands with high peaks than there are in the Atlantic Ocean. Researchers at James Cook University in Townsville, Australia, think that's why the birds survived rising sea levels in the Pacific, but not in the Atlantic. The Bermuda fossil find was surprising to scientists for another reason: The only other albatross fossils they had found before were from 5 million years ago. The latest fossils, which are only 400,000 years old, indicate that albatross were cruising over the Atlantic more recently than scientists had realized. Today, the short-tailed albatross is an endangered species. The only surviving birds live in Japan. Let's hope these and all albatross can keep gliding well into the future.—S. McDonagh

Watery Fate for Nature's Gliders
Watery Fate for Nature's Gliders








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™