Agriculture
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Seeds of the Future
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Bullfrogs
Newts
Animals
Vampire Bats on the Run
Saving Africa's Wild Dogs
Ants on Stilts
Behavior
Island of Hope
Copycat Monkeys
Homework blues
Birds
Flightless Birds
Backyard Birds
Robins
Chemistry and Materials
Meteorites may have sparked life on Earth
Scientist Profile: Wally Gilbert
The chemistry of sleeplessness
Computers
Look into My Eyes
Batteries built by Viruses
The science of disappearing
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Some Dinos Dined on Grass
Did Dinosaurs Do Handstands?
Message in a dinosaur's teeth
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Life trapped under a glacier
Challenging the Forces of Nature
Explorer of the Extreme Deep
Environment
Easy Ways to Conserve Water
Fishing for Fun Takes Toll
The Oily Gulf
Finding the Past
Of Lice and Old Clothes
Meet your mysterious relative
Oldest Writing in the New World
Fish
Whale Sharks
Megamouth Sharks
Skates and Rays
Food and Nutrition
Symbols from the Stone Age
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Pronouns
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
Setting a Prime Number Record
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
Human Body
A Long Haul
Remembering Facts and Feelings
A Long Trek to Asia
Invertebrates
Ants
Black Widow spiders
Leeches
Mammals
Chihuahuas
Rabbits
Blue Bear
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
How children learn
Physics
Project Music
Road Bumps
Einstein's Skateboard
Plants
Making the most of a meal
Assembling the Tree of Life
Flower family knows its roots
Reptiles
Lizards
Boa Constrictors
Anacondas
Space and Astronomy
Holes in Martian moon mystery
Supernovas Shed Light on Dark Energy
Ready, Set, Supernova
Technology and Engineering
A Light Delay
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
What is a Verb?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Revving Up Green Machines
How to Fly Like a Bat
Middle school science adventures
Weather
Catching Some Rays
Watering the Air
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Add your Article

Wake Up, Sleepy Gene

Some people can stay up all night and still get work done the next day. I'm not one of them. After a night without enough sleep, I feel cranky. I have trouble remembering things. And all I want to do is crawl back into bed and snooze. How do you feel after you've stayed up late to finish schoolwork? Or the day after a slumber party? Scientists now say that your answers to these questions may depend on your genes. Genes are stretches of DNA that work like an instruction manual for our cells. Genes tell our bodies and brains what to do. People have about 40,000 genes, and each gene can have different forms. So, for example, certain forms of some genes make your eyes blue. Other versions of those genes make your eyes brown. In a similar way, new research suggests that a gene called period3 affects how well you function without sleep. The discovery adds to older evidence that period3 helps determine whether you like to stay up late or get up early. The period3 gene comes in two forms: short and long. Everyone has two copies of the gene. So, you may have two longs, two shorts, or one of each. Your particular combination depends on what your parents passed on to you. Scientists from the University of Surrey in England studied 24 people who had either two short or two long copies of period3. Study participants had to stay awake for 40 hours straight. Then, they took tests that measured how quickly they pushed a button when numbers flashed on a screen and how well they could remember lists of numbers. Results showed that the people with the short form of period3 performed much better on these tests than the people with the long form did. In both groups, people performed worst in the early morning. That's the time when truck drivers and other night-shift workers say they have the most trouble concentrating. After the first round of experiments, participants were finally allowed to sleep. People in the group that performed well on the tests (those with the short form of period3) took about 18 minutes to nod off. People with the long period3 gene, by contrast, fell asleep in just 8 minutes. They also spent more time in deep sleep. That suggests that people with the long form of the gene need more and deeper sleep to keep their brains working at top form.

Wake Up, Sleepy Gene
Wake Up, Sleepy Gene








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™