Agriculture
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Poison Dart Frogs
Salamanders
Animals
Vampire Bats on the Run
No Fair: Monkey Sees, Doesn't
Hearing Whales
Behavior
The Science Fair Circuit
Swedish Rhapsody
The Colorful World of Synesthesia
Birds
Pigeons
Blue Jays
Kingfishers
Chemistry and Materials
Unscrambling a Gem of a Mystery
Flytrap Machine
Pencil Thin
Computers
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Games with a Purpose
Supersonic Splash
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dinosaurs Grow Up
Dinosaur Eggs-citement
Feathered Fossils
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Digging into a Tsunami Disaster
Ice Age Melting and Rising Seas
Detecting an Eerie Sea Glow
Environment
Out in the Cold
Food Web Woes
Seabirds Deliver Arctic Pollutants
Finding the Past
A Long Haul
Stone Age Sole Survivors
Sahara Cemetery
Fish
Trout
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Codfish
Food and Nutrition
Sponges' secret weapon
Eat Out, Eat Smart
A Taste for Cheese
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Mastering The GSAT Exam
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Scholarship
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
Prime Time for Cicadas
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Play for Science
Human Body
Hey batter, wake up!
Cell Phone Tattlers
Spitting Up Blobs to Get Around
Invertebrates
Termites
Scallops
Mosquitos
Mammals
Little Brown Bats
Kangaroos
African Mammals
Parents
How children learn
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Dreams of Floating in Space
Black Hole Journey
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Plants
A Change in Leaf Color
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Reptiles
Chameleons
Black Mamba
Boa Constrictors
Space and Astronomy
Baby Star
Big Galaxy Swallows Little Galaxy
No Fat Stars
Technology and Engineering
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
Slip Sliming Away
Searching for Alien Life
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Pronouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Where rivers run uphill
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Troubles with Hubble
Weather
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Where rivers run uphill
Warmest Year on Record
Add your Article

Vent Worms Like It Hot

Some worms that live on deep-sea vents can stand temperatures that most other animals on Earth won't tolerate. Now, scientists have tested these worms in the lab to find out exactly how hot the worms like it to be. It turns out that the worms prefer water at temperatures near the upper limit of what animals are known to survive. These tiny worms, called Paralvinella sulfincola, construct tubes as places to live. These tubes, which look a bit like miniature tree trunks lying on their side, sit directly on the hotter zones of underwater, chimney-like crags, where material from inside Earth spews out. Poking their feathery, orange gills out of the tubes, the sulfide worms look like tipped-over palm trees. Using submersibles with robotic arms, researchers collected some of the worms from 2,200 meters (7,200 feet) deep in the northeastern Pacific. In the lab, the scientists put the worms into an aquarium adjusted to copy the high-pressure environment to which the worms are accustomed. There, the creatures were free to move around as much as they wanted. To test temperature preferences, the researchers heated the aquarium unevenly. One end was 20C (68F), which is close to room temperature. The other end was a sweltering 61C (142F). At sea level, water boils at 100C (212F). The scientists kept track of where the creatures liked to hang out most. Some of the worms spent 7 hours in an area that was 50C (122F). One worm crawled into an area that was 55C (131F) and stayed for 15 minutes before moving away. That's seriously hot. Even though deep-sea vents are famous for how hot they are, few vent creatures can survive the hottest spots. In a similar experiment, for example, a type of vent shrimp died in the lab at temperatures around 43C (109F). P. sulfincola, it seems, is an exceptional species that provides a new window into the mysterious world of deep-sea vents.E. Sohn

Vent Worms Like It Hot
Vent Worms Like It Hot








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™