Agriculture
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Silk’s superpowers
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Salamanders
Frogs and Toads
Animals
Ultrasonic Frogs Raise the Pitch
Chicken Talk
No Fair: Monkey Sees, Doesn't
Behavior
Internet Generation
Pain Expectations
Brain cells take a break
Birds
Backyard Birds
Ibises
Robins
Chemistry and Materials
When frog gender flips
A Diamond Polish for Ancient Tools
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Computers
A Classroom of the Mind
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Nonstop Robot
Dinosaurs and Fossils
The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs
Dinosaur Eggs-citement
Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Giving Sharks Safe Homes
Hints of Life in Ancient Lava
Petrified Lightning
Environment
Saving Wetlands
Pollution Detective
A 'Book' on Every Living Thing
Finding the Past
Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist
Fakes in the museum
Sahara Cemetery
Fish
Salmon
Mahi-Mahi
Seahorses
Food and Nutrition
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
How Super Are Superfruits?
Recipe for Health
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Who vs. Whom
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Mastering The GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
Play for Science
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Math is a real brain bender
Human Body
Cell Phones and Possible Health Hazards
Heart Revival
Kids now getting 'adult' disease
Invertebrates
Sponges
Spiders
Leeches
Mammals
Persian Cats
Moose
Coyotes
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
How children learn
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Powering Ball Lightning
Plants
Springing forward
Underwater Jungles
Stalking Plants by Scent
Reptiles
Box Turtles
Turtles
Rattlesnakes
Space and Astronomy
A Darker, Warmer Red Planet
Wrong-way planets do gymnastics
Zooming In on the Wild Sun
Technology and Engineering
A Satellite of Your Own
A Clean Getaway
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Noun
Transportation
Charged cars that would charge
Where rivers run uphill
Reach for the Sky
Weather
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
Catching Some Rays
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Add your Article

Vampire Bats

Vampire bats are bats that feed on blood (hematophagy). There are only three bat species that feed on blood: The Common Vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus), the Hairy-legged Vampire bat (Diphylla ecaudata), and the White-winged Vampire bat (Diaemus youngi). All three species are native to the Americas, ranging from Mexico to Brazil, Chile, and Argentina. Contrary to popular belief, these bats rarely bite people because they apparently dislike human blood. The Nose Knows: Unlike Fruit-eating bats, the Vampire bats have a short, conical muzzle without a nose leaf. Instead they have naked pads with U-shaped grooves at the tip. The common vampire bat also has specialized infrared sensors on its nose. A nucleus has been found in the brain of vampire bats that has a similar position and has similar histology to the infrared nucleus of infrared sensitive snakes. A Liquid Diet: They have small ears and a short tail membrane. Their front teeth are specialized for cutting and their back teeth are much smaller than in other bats. Their digestive systems are also specialized for their liquid diet. The saliva of Vampire bats contains a substance, draculin, which prevents the victim's blood from clotting. They, therefore, lap blood rather than suck it as most people imagine. They Come Out at Night: They come out to feed only when it is fully dark. Like Fruit-eating bats, and unlike insectivorous and fish-eating bats, they only emit low-energy sound pulses. The Common Vampire bat feeds mostly on the blood of mammals, whereas the Hairy-legged Vampire bat, and the White-winged Vampire bat feed on the blood of birds. Once the common Vampire bat locates a host, usually a sleeping mammal, they land and approach it on the ground. A recent study found that common vampire bats can, in addition to walking, run at speeds of up to 1.2 meters per second. They possibly locate a suitable place to bite using their infrared sensors. Problem Pee: The feeding pattern of the vampire bat adds a layer of complexity to its anatomy. Because they often do not find host organisms for many hours and may have to fly a long distance to do so, vampire bats usually feed in enormous quantities. This influx of proteins may make the bat too heavy to fly. Accordingly, the bat's urinary system accommodates this by releasing dilute urine consisting of a lot of water and fewer solutes. However, when the bat is resting, a new problem is faced. The large amounts of protein create excess urea and must be disposed of. The urinary system of the vampire bat then uses various hormones to make concentrated urine -- consisting of more urea and less water. Blood Transfusion: Vampire bats tend to live in almost completely dark places, such as caves, old wells, hollow trees, and buildings. Colonies can range from a single individual to thousands. They often roost with other species of bat. They will almost always have only one offspring per breeding season. Each colony will typically contain only one reproducing male, with around twenty females and their offspring. They need blood at least once every few days to survive. If they can't get blood, they'll approach another vampire bat whilst roosting, asking for a blood 'transfusion'. The blood is exchanged mouth-to-mouth in a motion that looks very much like kissing. Vampire bats can live up to 9 years in the wild and up to 19 in captivity. Mixed Bag: Vampire bats are common carriers of the deadly rabies virus which, aside from its danger to humans, is responsible for the deaths of many thousands of farm animals each year in tropical and sub-tropical America. However they do have some benefits, in a study which appeared in the January 10, 2003 issue of Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association, a genetically engineered drug called desmoteplase based on the saliva of Desmodus rotundus was shown to improve stroke patients. 3 of a Kind: The three species are quite different from each other, and are therefore placed within different genera (no other species are currently classified in any of the three genera concerned). But they are related. In older literature, the three genera are placed within a family, Desmodontidae, but this is now regarded as unhelpful, as it hides the similarities the Vampire bats have with other members of the American leaf-nosed bat family, Phyllostomidae. They are therefore now grouped as a subfamily, the Desmodontinae within the Phyllostomidae. The fact that the three known species of Vampire bat all seem more similar to one another than any of them is to any other species suggests that sanguivory (feeding on blood) only evolved once, and that all three species share a common ancestor.

Vampire Bats
Vampire Bats








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™