Agriculture
Got Milk? How?
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Seeds of the Future
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Tree Frogs
Newts
Animals
Insect Stowaways
Crocodile Hearts
From Chimps to People
Behavior
Honeybees do the wave
Calculating crime
A Recipe for Happiness
Birds
Blue Jays
Condors
Macaws
Chemistry and Materials
These gems make their own way
Meteorites may have sparked life on Earth
Gooey Secrets of Mussel Power
Computers
Play for Science
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
The Shape of the Internet
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Some Dinos Dined on Grass
Dino Babies
A Dino King's Ancestor
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Drilling Deep for Fuel
Arctic Algae Show Climate Change
Farms sprout in cities
Environment
Improving the Camel
Island Extinctions
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Finding the Past
If Only Bones Could Speak
Decoding a Beverage Jar
Stone Age Sole Survivors
Fish
Manta Rays
Basking Sharks
Piranha
Food and Nutrition
Building a Food Pyramid
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
How Super Are Superfruits?
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
Deep-space dancers
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
Math of the World
Human Body
Sun Screen
Electricity's Spark of Life
Music in the Brain
Invertebrates
Termites
Tarantula
Jellyfish
Mammals
Domestic Shorthairs
Capybaras
Lhasa Apsos
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
Electric Backpack
Gaining a Swift Lift
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Plants
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Stalking Plants by Scent
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Reptiles
Gila Monsters
Garter Snakes
Snakes
Space and Astronomy
Evidence of a Wet Mars
A Moon's Icy Spray
Dark Galaxy
Technology and Engineering
Searching for Alien Life
Crime Lab
Musclebots Take Some Steps
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Pronouns
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Reach for the Sky
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Robots on the Road, Again
Weather
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Where rivers run uphill
Arctic Melt
Add your Article

Vampire Bats

Vampire bats are bats that feed on blood (hematophagy). There are only three bat species that feed on blood: The Common Vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus), the Hairy-legged Vampire bat (Diphylla ecaudata), and the White-winged Vampire bat (Diaemus youngi). All three species are native to the Americas, ranging from Mexico to Brazil, Chile, and Argentina. Contrary to popular belief, these bats rarely bite people because they apparently dislike human blood. The Nose Knows: Unlike Fruit-eating bats, the Vampire bats have a short, conical muzzle without a nose leaf. Instead they have naked pads with U-shaped grooves at the tip. The common vampire bat also has specialized infrared sensors on its nose. A nucleus has been found in the brain of vampire bats that has a similar position and has similar histology to the infrared nucleus of infrared sensitive snakes. A Liquid Diet: They have small ears and a short tail membrane. Their front teeth are specialized for cutting and their back teeth are much smaller than in other bats. Their digestive systems are also specialized for their liquid diet. The saliva of Vampire bats contains a substance, draculin, which prevents the victim's blood from clotting. They, therefore, lap blood rather than suck it as most people imagine. They Come Out at Night: They come out to feed only when it is fully dark. Like Fruit-eating bats, and unlike insectivorous and fish-eating bats, they only emit low-energy sound pulses. The Common Vampire bat feeds mostly on the blood of mammals, whereas the Hairy-legged Vampire bat, and the White-winged Vampire bat feed on the blood of birds. Once the common Vampire bat locates a host, usually a sleeping mammal, they land and approach it on the ground. A recent study found that common vampire bats can, in addition to walking, run at speeds of up to 1.2 meters per second. They possibly locate a suitable place to bite using their infrared sensors. Problem Pee: The feeding pattern of the vampire bat adds a layer of complexity to its anatomy. Because they often do not find host organisms for many hours and may have to fly a long distance to do so, vampire bats usually feed in enormous quantities. This influx of proteins may make the bat too heavy to fly. Accordingly, the bat's urinary system accommodates this by releasing dilute urine consisting of a lot of water and fewer solutes. However, when the bat is resting, a new problem is faced. The large amounts of protein create excess urea and must be disposed of. The urinary system of the vampire bat then uses various hormones to make concentrated urine -- consisting of more urea and less water. Blood Transfusion: Vampire bats tend to live in almost completely dark places, such as caves, old wells, hollow trees, and buildings. Colonies can range from a single individual to thousands. They often roost with other species of bat. They will almost always have only one offspring per breeding season. Each colony will typically contain only one reproducing male, with around twenty females and their offspring. They need blood at least once every few days to survive. If they can't get blood, they'll approach another vampire bat whilst roosting, asking for a blood 'transfusion'. The blood is exchanged mouth-to-mouth in a motion that looks very much like kissing. Vampire bats can live up to 9 years in the wild and up to 19 in captivity. Mixed Bag: Vampire bats are common carriers of the deadly rabies virus which, aside from its danger to humans, is responsible for the deaths of many thousands of farm animals each year in tropical and sub-tropical America. However they do have some benefits, in a study which appeared in the January 10, 2003 issue of Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association, a genetically engineered drug called desmoteplase based on the saliva of Desmodus rotundus was shown to improve stroke patients. 3 of a Kind: The three species are quite different from each other, and are therefore placed within different genera (no other species are currently classified in any of the three genera concerned). But they are related. In older literature, the three genera are placed within a family, Desmodontidae, but this is now regarded as unhelpful, as it hides the similarities the Vampire bats have with other members of the American leaf-nosed bat family, Phyllostomidae. They are therefore now grouped as a subfamily, the Desmodontinae within the Phyllostomidae. The fact that the three known species of Vampire bat all seem more similar to one another than any of them is to any other species suggests that sanguivory (feeding on blood) only evolved once, and that all three species share a common ancestor.

Vampire Bats
Vampire Bats








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™