Agriculture
Making the most of a meal
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Amphibians
Salamanders
Bullfrogs
Frogs and Toads
Animals
Sleepless at Sea
Poor Devils
Pothole Repair, Insect-style
Behavior
Eating Troubles
Slumber by the numbers
Bringing fish back up to size
Birds
Falcons
Hummingbirds
A Meal Plan for Birds
Chemistry and Materials
These gems make their own way
Revving Up Green Machines
Butterfly Wings and Waterproof Coats
Computers
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Graphene's superstrength
Fingerprint Evidence
Dinosaurs and Fossils
A Living Fossil
Hunting by Sucking, Long Ago
Dino-bite!
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E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Less Mixing Can Affect Lake's Ecosystem
A Dire Shortage of Water
Environment
Seabirds Deliver Arctic Pollutants
Will Climate Change Depose Monarchs?
Lessons from a Lonely Tortoise
Finding the Past
Words of the Distant Past
Watching deep-space fireworks
Salt and Early Civilization
Fish
Trout
Tuna
Flounder
Food and Nutrition
Making good, brown fat
A Taste for Cheese
The Color of Health
GSAT English Rules
Capitalization Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
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GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
Math is a real brain bender
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Setting a Prime Number Record
Human Body
Germ Zapper
Disease Detectives
Kids now getting 'adult' disease
Invertebrates
Grasshoppers
Ticks
Flatworms
Mammals
African Hyenas
Coyotes
African Wildedbeest
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
How children learn
Physics
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Powering Ball Lightning
IceCube Science
Plants
Assembling the Tree of Life
A Giant Flower's New Family
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Reptiles
Turtles
Chameleons
Tortoises
Space and Astronomy
Planning for Mars
Asteroid Moons
No Fat Stars
Technology and Engineering
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
A Light Delay
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Noun
Transportation
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
How to Fly Like a Bat
Reach for the Sky
Weather
Where rivers run uphill
Warmest Year on Record
Arctic Melt
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Unveiling Titan

There's no place like home. Except, maybe, for Saturn's largest moon, Titan. A recent mission to this moon has found that it looks a lot like our planet. The journey began 7 years ago, when the Cassini spacecraft was launched on a mission to explore Saturn. Cassini went into orbit around the planet on July 1, 2004. Then, on Dec. 25, 2004, the European Space Agency's Huygens probe separated from the craft and coasted toward Titan. On Jan. 14, it plunged into the moon's atmosphere. The probe spent 2.5 hours gliding through Titan's atmosphere, and it sent signals from the moon's surface to Cassini for 70 minutes before it lost radio contact with the spacecraft. Cassini, in turn, relayed the information and pictures to astronomers in Germany. The scientists were surprised at how Earth-like Titan appeared. Huygens landed on ground that was hard on top but soft underneath, somewhat like wet sand. The researchers were able to decipher the ground's texture by measuring the force of the probe's impact and comparing it to the effect of forces on various types of terrain on Earth. Huygens took spectacular pictures of drainage channels leading to a shoreline. Photos also showed ground fog and structures that look like sandbars. Astronomers are especially interested in Titan's chemistry, because the moon might provide insights into Earth's early history. Just as Huygens landed, it measured a sharp rise in methane gas. Now, scientists suggest that the moon's channels were carved by liquid methane and ethane, instead of by water, as they would be on Earth. Titan's rocks appear to be made mainly of water-ice. Some of them look like river rocks on our planet. They were probably made round by rolling around in liquid. Titan and Earth have something else in common, too: nonstop weather and geological activity. Huygens showed no major craters on the moon's surface. Icy eruptions and rain probably keep the landscape rugged and constantly changing. Another mission to Saturn's famous moon probably won't happen again for decades. But when spacecraft do eventually get there again, there will probably be plenty more surprises.E. Sohn

Unveiling Titan
Unveiling Titan








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