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Got Milk? How?
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A Butterfly's New Green Glow
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Lighting goes digital
Screaming for Ice Cream
Mother-of-Pearl on Ice
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New eyes to scan the skies
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
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A Dino King's Ancestor
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
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A Global Warming Flap
Watering the Air
Rodent Rubbish as an Ice-Age Thermometer
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The Wolf and the Cow
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Eating Up Foul Sewage Smells
Finding the Past
A Long Trek to Asia
Early Maya Writing
Untangling Human Origins
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Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
The Color of Health
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
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Capitalization Rules
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
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GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
It's a Math World for Animals
Detecting True Art
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Germ Zapper
Walking to Exercise the Brain
Cell Phones and Possible Health Hazards
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Sea Anemones
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Camel Spiders
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Wolverines
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Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
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The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
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Speedy stars
Einstein's Skateboard
Dreams of Floating in Space
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When Fungi and Algae Marry
Fast-flying fungal spores
Plants Travel Wind Highways
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Planet Hunters Nab Three More
Gravity Tractor as Asteroid Mover
Saturn's Spongy Moon
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Crime Lab
Algae Motors
Sugar Power for Cell Phones
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
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Reach for the Sky
Middle school science adventures
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Warmest Year on Record
Catching Some Rays
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
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Unveiling Titan

There's no place like home. Except, maybe, for Saturn's largest moon, Titan. A recent mission to this moon has found that it looks a lot like our planet. The journey began 7 years ago, when the Cassini spacecraft was launched on a mission to explore Saturn. Cassini went into orbit around the planet on July 1, 2004. Then, on Dec. 25, 2004, the European Space Agency's Huygens probe separated from the craft and coasted toward Titan. On Jan. 14, it plunged into the moon's atmosphere. The probe spent 2.5 hours gliding through Titan's atmosphere, and it sent signals from the moon's surface to Cassini for 70 minutes before it lost radio contact with the spacecraft. Cassini, in turn, relayed the information and pictures to astronomers in Germany. The scientists were surprised at how Earth-like Titan appeared. Huygens landed on ground that was hard on top but soft underneath, somewhat like wet sand. The researchers were able to decipher the ground's texture by measuring the force of the probe's impact and comparing it to the effect of forces on various types of terrain on Earth. Huygens took spectacular pictures of drainage channels leading to a shoreline. Photos also showed ground fog and structures that look like sandbars. Astronomers are especially interested in Titan's chemistry, because the moon might provide insights into Earth's early history. Just as Huygens landed, it measured a sharp rise in methane gas. Now, scientists suggest that the moon's channels were carved by liquid methane and ethane, instead of by water, as they would be on Earth. Titan's rocks appear to be made mainly of water-ice. Some of them look like river rocks on our planet. They were probably made round by rolling around in liquid. Titan and Earth have something else in common, too: nonstop weather and geological activity. Huygens showed no major craters on the moon's surface. Icy eruptions and rain probably keep the landscape rugged and constantly changing. Another mission to Saturn's famous moon probably won't happen again for decades. But when spacecraft do eventually get there again, there will probably be plenty more surprises.E. Sohn

Unveiling Titan
Unveiling Titan








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