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Missing Moose
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Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Sky Dust Keeps Falling on Your Head
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Coral Islands Survive a Tsunami
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Sounds and Silence
Fishing for Fun Takes Toll
Food Web Woes
Finding the Past
Decoding a Beverage Jar
Unearthing Ancient Astronomy
An Ancient Childhood
Fish
Lungfish
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Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
Recipe for Health
Chew for Health
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Who vs. That vs. Which
Finding Subjects and Verbs
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GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
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Detecting True Art
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Prime Time for Cicadas
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Walking to Exercise the Brain
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Lion
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Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Black Hole Journey
Einstein's Skateboard
The Particle Zoo
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Farms sprout in cities
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
A Giant Flower's New Family
Reptiles
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Slip-sliding away
A Star's Belt of Dust and Rocks
Mercury's magnetic twisters
Technology and Engineering
Shape Shifting
A Clean Getaway
Algae Motors
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Noun
Transportation
Robots on the Road, Again
Ready, unplug, drive
Where rivers run uphill
Weather
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Warmest Year on Record
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
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Unveiling Titan

There's no place like home. Except, maybe, for Saturn's largest moon, Titan. A recent mission to this moon has found that it looks a lot like our planet. The journey began 7 years ago, when the Cassini spacecraft was launched on a mission to explore Saturn. Cassini went into orbit around the planet on July 1, 2004. Then, on Dec. 25, 2004, the European Space Agency's Huygens probe separated from the craft and coasted toward Titan. On Jan. 14, it plunged into the moon's atmosphere. The probe spent 2.5 hours gliding through Titan's atmosphere, and it sent signals from the moon's surface to Cassini for 70 minutes before it lost radio contact with the spacecraft. Cassini, in turn, relayed the information and pictures to astronomers in Germany. The scientists were surprised at how Earth-like Titan appeared. Huygens landed on ground that was hard on top but soft underneath, somewhat like wet sand. The researchers were able to decipher the ground's texture by measuring the force of the probe's impact and comparing it to the effect of forces on various types of terrain on Earth. Huygens took spectacular pictures of drainage channels leading to a shoreline. Photos also showed ground fog and structures that look like sandbars. Astronomers are especially interested in Titan's chemistry, because the moon might provide insights into Earth's early history. Just as Huygens landed, it measured a sharp rise in methane gas. Now, scientists suggest that the moon's channels were carved by liquid methane and ethane, instead of by water, as they would be on Earth. Titan's rocks appear to be made mainly of water-ice. Some of them look like river rocks on our planet. They were probably made round by rolling around in liquid. Titan and Earth have something else in common, too: nonstop weather and geological activity. Huygens showed no major craters on the moon's surface. Icy eruptions and rain probably keep the landscape rugged and constantly changing. Another mission to Saturn's famous moon probably won't happen again for decades. But when spacecraft do eventually get there again, there will probably be plenty more surprises.E. Sohn

Unveiling Titan
Unveiling Titan








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