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Fast-flying fungal spores
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
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Polly Shouldn't Get a Cracker
Color-Changing Bugs
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Memory by Hypnosis
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Sticky Silky Feet
Putting the Squeeze on Toothpaste
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Winged Insects May Go Way Back
A Living Fossil
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
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Earth
Springing forward
Getting the dirt on carbon
Drilling Deep for Fuel
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Snow Traps
Seabirds Deliver Arctic Pollutants
What is groundwater
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Digging Up Stone Age Art
A Big Discovery about Little People
An Ancient Childhood
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Making good, brown fat
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The mercury in that tuna
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
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Tarrant High overcoming the odds
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
It's a Math World for Animals
Deep-space dancers
Human Body
Smiles Turn Away Colds
A Long Haul
Tapeworms and Drug Delivery
Invertebrates
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Mosquitos
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African Gorillas
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Sperm Whale
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
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Dreams of Floating in Space
Road Bumps
Project Music
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Fungus Hunt
Springing forward
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
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Space and Astronomy
A Planet's Slim-Fast Plan
A Very Distant Planet Says "Cheese"
Dark Galaxy
Technology and Engineering
Machine Copy
A Satellite of Your Own
Young Scientists Take Flight
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
Pronouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Reach for the Sky
Ready, unplug, drive
Weather
Where rivers run uphill
A Dire Shortage of Water
Science loses out when ice caps melt
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Unveiling Titan

There's no place like home. Except, maybe, for Saturn's largest moon, Titan. A recent mission to this moon has found that it looks a lot like our planet. The journey began 7 years ago, when the Cassini spacecraft was launched on a mission to explore Saturn. Cassini went into orbit around the planet on July 1, 2004. Then, on Dec. 25, 2004, the European Space Agency's Huygens probe separated from the craft and coasted toward Titan. On Jan. 14, it plunged into the moon's atmosphere. The probe spent 2.5 hours gliding through Titan's atmosphere, and it sent signals from the moon's surface to Cassini for 70 minutes before it lost radio contact with the spacecraft. Cassini, in turn, relayed the information and pictures to astronomers in Germany. The scientists were surprised at how Earth-like Titan appeared. Huygens landed on ground that was hard on top but soft underneath, somewhat like wet sand. The researchers were able to decipher the ground's texture by measuring the force of the probe's impact and comparing it to the effect of forces on various types of terrain on Earth. Huygens took spectacular pictures of drainage channels leading to a shoreline. Photos also showed ground fog and structures that look like sandbars. Astronomers are especially interested in Titan's chemistry, because the moon might provide insights into Earth's early history. Just as Huygens landed, it measured a sharp rise in methane gas. Now, scientists suggest that the moon's channels were carved by liquid methane and ethane, instead of by water, as they would be on Earth. Titan's rocks appear to be made mainly of water-ice. Some of them look like river rocks on our planet. They were probably made round by rolling around in liquid. Titan and Earth have something else in common, too: nonstop weather and geological activity. Huygens showed no major craters on the moon's surface. Icy eruptions and rain probably keep the landscape rugged and constantly changing. Another mission to Saturn's famous moon probably won't happen again for decades. But when spacecraft do eventually get there again, there will probably be plenty more surprises.—E. Sohn

Unveiling Titan
Unveiling Titan








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