Agriculture
Seeds of the Future
Silk’s superpowers
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Amphibians
Toads
Newts
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
Saving Africa's Wild Dogs
Little Beetle, Big Horns
New Elephant-Shrew
Behavior
Listening to Birdsong
The Science Fair Circuit
The (kids') eyes have it
Birds
Ibises
Quails
Backyard Birds
Chemistry and Materials
Earth from the inside out
Heaviest named element is official
Hair Detectives
Computers
Fingerprint Evidence
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Play for Science
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth
Dinosaur Dig
The bug that may have killed a dinosaur
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
A Volcano Wakes Up
Undersea Vent System Active for Ages
Hints of Life in Ancient Lava
Environment
Toxic Cleanups Get a Microbe Boost
To Catch a Dragonfly
Nanosponges Soak Up Pollutants
Finding the Past
The Puzzle of Ancient Mariners
Watching deep-space fireworks
Settling the Americas
Fish
Whale Sharks
Hammerhead Sharks
White Tip Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
The Color of Health
GSAT English Rules
Capitalization Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Mastering The GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
Play for Science
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Math of the World
Human Body
Electricity's Spark of Life
Heavy Sleep
What the appendix is good for
Invertebrates
Shrimps
Leeches
Grasshoppers
Mammals
Gerbils
African Leopards
Weasels and Kin
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Electric Backpack
Project Music
Einstein's Skateboard
Plants
Fungus Hunt
Seeds of the Future
The algae invasion
Reptiles
Turtles
Crocodiles
Chameleons
Space and Astronomy
Planning for Mars
A Family in Space
Dark Galaxy
Technology and Engineering
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
A Clean Getaway
Riding Sunlight
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
What is a Preposition?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Flying the Hyper Skies
Robots on a Rocky Road
Weather
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Add your Article

Untangling Human Origins

Nowadays, it's pretty easy to tell a person from an ape. Millions of years ago, the differences would have been much harder to pick out. According to the scientific theory of evolution, apes and people have a common ancestor—one ancient animal from which both species evolved. At some time in the past, however, the creatures that would become humans started to differ from the creatures that would become apes and chimpanzees. A few years ago, anthropologists digging in the African country of Chad discovered some intriguing fossils. They found a skull, along with some teeth and jaw pieces, that was between 6 million and 7 million years old. Because the face and teeth resembled those of later human ancestors, the scientists said that the fossils were those of a human-like, or hominid, species—even though the skull could hold only a chimp-sized brain. They called this creature Sahelanthropus tchadensis. Not everyone agreed with this conclusion. Another group of anthropologists argued that the fossil pieces came from an ancient ape. Now, the scientists who found the bones have dug up more fragments. And, because some of the original skull bits had been squished, the researchers used a computer program to unsquish the pieces and fit them together into a three-dimensional picture of the skull. The newly found teeth look more human than chimp, the researchers say. Moreover, the computer image of the skull shows a human-like flat face. The way the skull meets the spine and neck might also have allowed this primate to walk upright, they add. To confirm this, however, scientists would have to find leg bones as well. The new information strengthens the view that the old bones belong to the earliest known human ancestor, the scientists conclude. This creature lived just after the split between the human and chimpanzee evolutionary families. Other anthropologists still aren't convinced that this is our earliest ancestor. Humans and ancient apes looked a lot alike 7 million years ago, they say, and some features of the fossil skull are more ape-like than human-like.—K. Ramsayer

Untangling Human Origins
Untangling Human Origins








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™