Agriculture
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Toads
Newts
Animals
Sleep Affects a Bird's Singing
Awake at Night
Roach Love Songs
Behavior
Face values
Video Game Violence
Listen and Learn
Birds
Chicken
Carnivorous Birds
Birds We Eat
Chemistry and Materials
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Diamond Glow
Supersonic Splash
Computers
Play for Science
A Classroom of the Mind
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Dinosaurs and Fossils
The bug that may have killed a dinosaur
A Living Fossil
An Ancient Spider's Web
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Unnatural Disasters
Hot Summers, Wild Fires
Plastic-munching microbes
Environment
A Newspaper's Hidden Cost
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
A Vulture's Hidden Enemy
Finding the Past
Oldest Writing in the New World
Childhood's Long History
Stone Tablet May Solve Maya Mystery
Fish
Sting Ray
Sturgeons
Pygmy Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
Packing Fat
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Whoever vs. Whomever
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
Losing with Heads or Tails
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Play for Science
Human Body
Germ Zapper
Remembering Facts and Feelings
Foul Play?
Invertebrates
Crabs
Mussels
Leeches
Mammals
Vampire Bats
Chihuahuas
Wolves
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Speedy stars
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Plants
Stalking Plants by Scent
Surprise Visitor
Nature's Alphabet
Reptiles
Crocodiles
Komodo Dragons
Iguanas
Space and Astronomy
Slip-sliding away
Evidence of a Wet Mars
Black Holes That Burp
Technology and Engineering
Machine Copy
Smart Windows
Young Scientists Take Flight
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Verb?
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Charged cars that would charge
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Ready, unplug, drive
Weather
Recipe for a Hurricane
Arctic Melt
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Add your Article

Untangling Human Origins

Nowadays, it's pretty easy to tell a person from an ape. Millions of years ago, the differences would have been much harder to pick out. According to the scientific theory of evolution, apes and people have a common ancestor—one ancient animal from which both species evolved. At some time in the past, however, the creatures that would become humans started to differ from the creatures that would become apes and chimpanzees. A few years ago, anthropologists digging in the African country of Chad discovered some intriguing fossils. They found a skull, along with some teeth and jaw pieces, that was between 6 million and 7 million years old. Because the face and teeth resembled those of later human ancestors, the scientists said that the fossils were those of a human-like, or hominid, species—even though the skull could hold only a chimp-sized brain. They called this creature Sahelanthropus tchadensis. Not everyone agreed with this conclusion. Another group of anthropologists argued that the fossil pieces came from an ancient ape. Now, the scientists who found the bones have dug up more fragments. And, because some of the original skull bits had been squished, the researchers used a computer program to unsquish the pieces and fit them together into a three-dimensional picture of the skull. The newly found teeth look more human than chimp, the researchers say. Moreover, the computer image of the skull shows a human-like flat face. The way the skull meets the spine and neck might also have allowed this primate to walk upright, they add. To confirm this, however, scientists would have to find leg bones as well. The new information strengthens the view that the old bones belong to the earliest known human ancestor, the scientists conclude. This creature lived just after the split between the human and chimpanzee evolutionary families. Other anthropologists still aren't convinced that this is our earliest ancestor. Humans and ancient apes looked a lot alike 7 million years ago, they say, and some features of the fossil skull are more ape-like than human-like.—K. Ramsayer

Untangling Human Origins
Untangling Human Origins








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™