Agriculture
Watering the Air
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Amphibians
Toads
Newts
Salamanders
Animals
Assembling the Tree of Life
Insects Take a Breather
Dolphin Sponge Moms
Behavior
From dipping to fishing
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Mice sense each other's fear
Birds
Peafowl
Condors
Storks
Chemistry and Materials
Supergoo to the rescue
Mother-of-Pearl on Ice
A Framework for Growing Bone
Computers
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Computers with Attitude
Getting in Touch with Touch
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dinosaur Dig
Digging Dinos
Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Petrified Lightning
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Life under Ice
Environment
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
The Birds are Falling
Power of the Wind
Finding the Past
Salt and Early Civilization
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
Big Woman of the Distant Past
Fish
Puffer Fish
Sting Ray
Freshwater Fish
Food and Nutrition
Building a Food Pyramid
Recipe for Health
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
GSAT English Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Capitalization Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Math is a real brain bender
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Human Body
A Long Trek to Asia
Sleeping Soundly for a Longer Life
Walking to Exercise the Brain
Invertebrates
Scorpions
Praying Mantis
Giant Squid
Mammals
Weasels
Weasels and Kin
Llamas
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Children and Media
How children learn
Physics
Black Hole Journey
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Gaining a Swift Lift
Plants
Nature's Alphabet
Assembling the Tree of Life
Flower family knows its roots
Reptiles
Copperhead Snakes
Caimans
Iguanas
Space and Astronomy
Galaxies Divide Sharply Along Color Lines
Chaos Among the Planets
A Galaxy Far, Far, Far Away
Technology and Engineering
Musclebots Take Some Steps
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Young Scientists Take Flight
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Noun
Transportation
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Revving Up Green Machines
Ready, unplug, drive
Weather
Either Martians or Mars has gas
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
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Unscrambling a Gem of a Mystery

Hidden inside every shiny green emerald is a geographical mystery. Once an emerald is plucked from a mine in its home country and turned into a piece of jewelry, it can be nearly impossible to figure out where the gem came from in the first place. Now, researchers from France think they have found a solution. It's all about the water. Molecules of water are trapped inside tiny channels in every emerald. Water has the chemical formula H2O. This means that each molecule of water is made up of three atoms: two atoms of hydrogen (H) and one atom of oxygen (O). There are several types of hydrogen atoms. One unusual type, called deuterium, weighs twice as much as the type of hydrogen most commonly found. Some water molecules contain the heavier form of hydrogen instead of the lighter one. It turns out that when you shine a special kind of laser light on an emerald, the heavy hydrogen reacts differently in emeralds from different parts of the world. This signal reveals where a certain emerald came from. So far, the researchers have used their method to trace emeralds to 10 specific mines in seven countries. They can also tell the difference between natural emeralds and human-made ones. Emeralds from some countries cost more than others, so the new technique might help jewelry sellers determine how much their gems are truly worth. It could also help historians trace ancient trade routes. So, every gem carries its own story, and researchers are starting to translate it into a language that we can all understand.—E. Sohn

Unscrambling a Gem of a Mystery
Unscrambling a Gem of a Mystery








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