Agriculture
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Making the most of a meal
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Toads
Tree Frogs
Animals
Copybees
Tool Use Comes Naturally to Crows
Professor Ant
Behavior
The chemistry of sleeplessness
Swedish Rhapsody
The Electric Brain
Birds
Flightless Birds
Eagles
Nightingales
Chemistry and Materials
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
Graphene's superstrength
The Incredible Shrunken Kids
Computers
Graphene's superstrength
The science of disappearing
Look into My Eyes
Dinosaurs and Fossils
A Dino King's Ancestor
Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth
Fingerprinting Fossils
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Bugs with Gas
On the Trail of America's Next Top Scientists
Rodent Rubbish as an Ice-Age Thermometer
Environment
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Giant snakes invading North America
Little Bits of Trouble
Finding the Past
Your inner Neandertal
Words of the Distant Past
Chicken of the Sea
Fish
Electric Catfish
Tuna
Electric Eel
Food and Nutrition
The Essence of Celery
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
Yummy bugs
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Problems with Prepositions
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
Losing with Heads or Tails
Play for Science
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Human Body
Remembering Facts and Feelings
Sea Kids See Clearly Underwater
A Long Trek to Asia
Invertebrates
Squid
Lobsters
Cockroaches
Mammals
Bears
St. Bernards
African Wild Dog
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
How children learn
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Speedy stars
IceCube Science
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Plants
Fast-flying fungal spores
Fungus Hunt
Sweet, Sticky Science
Reptiles
Tortoises
Pythons
Lizards
Space and Astronomy
Roving the Red Planet
A Dead Star's Dusty Ring
A Great Ball of Fire
Technology and Engineering
Smart Windows
Reach for the Sky
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Preposition?
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Robots on a Rocky Road
Troubles with Hubble
Flying the Hyper Skies
Weather
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Where rivers run uphill
Recipe for a Hurricane
Add your Article

Unscrambling a Gem of a Mystery

Hidden inside every shiny green emerald is a geographical mystery. Once an emerald is plucked from a mine in its home country and turned into a piece of jewelry, it can be nearly impossible to figure out where the gem came from in the first place. Now, researchers from France think they have found a solution. It's all about the water. Molecules of water are trapped inside tiny channels in every emerald. Water has the chemical formula H2O. This means that each molecule of water is made up of three atoms: two atoms of hydrogen (H) and one atom of oxygen (O). There are several types of hydrogen atoms. One unusual type, called deuterium, weighs twice as much as the type of hydrogen most commonly found. Some water molecules contain the heavier form of hydrogen instead of the lighter one. It turns out that when you shine a special kind of laser light on an emerald, the heavy hydrogen reacts differently in emeralds from different parts of the world. This signal reveals where a certain emerald came from. So far, the researchers have used their method to trace emeralds to 10 specific mines in seven countries. They can also tell the difference between natural emeralds and human-made ones. Emeralds from some countries cost more than others, so the new technique might help jewelry sellers determine how much their gems are truly worth. It could also help historians trace ancient trade routes. So, every gem carries its own story, and researchers are starting to translate it into a language that we can all understand.—E. Sohn

Unscrambling a Gem of a Mystery
Unscrambling a Gem of a Mystery








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™