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Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Middle school science adventures
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Salamanders and Newts
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Toads
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Deep Krill
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Swedish Rhapsody
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Big Machine Reveals Small Worlds
The solar system's biggest junkyard
A Light Delay
Computers
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The Earth-bound asteroid scientists saw coming
Batteries built by Viruses
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Have shell, will travel
Tiny Pterodactyl
A Rainforest Trapped in Amber
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Undersea Vent System Active for Ages
Earth Rocks On
Environment
Fishing for Fun Takes Toll
Little Bits of Trouble
Where rivers run uphill
Finding the Past
Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist
A Long Trek to Asia
Words of the Distant Past
Fish
Manta Rays
Swordfish
Mahi-Mahi
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How Super Are Superfruits?
Food for Life
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
GSAT English Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Who vs. That vs. Which
Whoever vs. Whomever
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Tarrant High overcoming the odds
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Scholarship
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E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Monkeys Count
Play for Science
Human Body
Spit Power
A New Touch
Opening a Channel for Tasting Salt
Invertebrates
Black Widow spiders
Earthworms
Camel Spiders
Mammals
Bison
Rodents
Deers
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Powering Ball Lightning
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Plants
A Giant Flower's New Family
Springing forward
Nature's Alphabet
Reptiles
Alligators
Sea Turtles
Caimans
Space and Astronomy
Chaos Among the Planets
Asteroid Moons
Dark Galaxy
Technology and Engineering
Sugar Power for Cell Phones
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
Riding Sunlight
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Charged cars that would charge
Revving Up Green Machines
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Weather
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Recipe for a Hurricane
Where rivers run uphill
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Undersea Vent System Active for Ages

Deep at the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean, there is a huge and mysterious network of rock structures called the Lost City. Rock spires on the steep slopes of an undersea mountain stretch as high as 18-story buildings. Cracks in the rocks spit out warm fluids that are full of minerals. Scientists have recently uncovered new clues about the chemical workings of the Lost City. The research might help explain how life began. The search for life’s beginnings often focuses on bubbling cracks in the seafloor, called hydrothermal vents. Underwater volcanoes heat most vent systems. The Lost City is different. There, chemical reactions between seawater and rocks warm the oozing flow of mineral-rich liquids. Researchers from Switzerland analyzed sediment from the Lost City, which lies 2,500 km east of Bermuda. They found rock deposits on the chimneys that are 25,000 years old. However, white, feathery structures around the vents formed just in the last few decades. All together, the new data suggests that the Lost City’s vent system has been spewing warm fluids for at least 30,000 years. Tons of tiny microbes live near the vents, happy as clams. Studying them might help explain how the world’s first microbes formed. Finding the Lost City was only the first step. Many mysteries remain!—E. Sohn

Undersea Vent System Active for Ages
Undersea Vent System Active for Ages








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