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Got Milk? How?
Springing forward
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Poison Dart Frogs
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Moss Echoes of Hunting
A Tongue and a Half
Crocodile Hearts
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The Snappy Lingo of Instant Messages
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
When Darwin got sick of feathers
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Quails
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Butterfly Wings and Waterproof Coats
The metal detector in your mouth
The Taste of Bubbles
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Graphene's superstrength
Play for Science
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Three strikes wiped out woolly mammoths
A Really Big (but Extinct) Rodent
Feathered Fossils
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
A Volcano Wakes Up
Rodent Rubbish as an Ice-Age Thermometer
Earth Rocks On
Environment
Seabirds Deliver Arctic Pollutants
Will Climate Change Depose Monarchs?
An Ocean View's Downside
Finding the Past
Settling the Americas
A Long Haul
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
Fish
Skates and Rays
Piranha
Mahi-Mahi
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Yummy bugs
The Essence of Celery
Eat Out, Eat Smart
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Who vs. Whom
Finding Subjects and Verbs
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Mastering The GSAT Exam
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GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
Math of the World
Losing with Heads or Tails
Monkeys Count
Human Body
Hear, Hear
The tell-tale bacteria
Taste Messenger
Invertebrates
Black Widow spiders
Praying Mantis
Shrimps
Mammals
Oxen
Shih Tzus
Raccoons
Parents
How children learn
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Dreams of Floating in Space
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Einstein's Skateboard
Plants
Surprise Visitor
Making the most of a meal
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
Reptiles
Sea Turtles
Black Mamba
Copperhead Snakes
Space and Astronomy
Rover Makes Splash on Mars
Roving the Red Planet
Solving a Sedna Mystery
Technology and Engineering
Riding Sunlight
Sugar Power for Cell Phones
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Charged cars that would charge
Ready, unplug, drive
Where rivers run uphill
Weather
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Arctic Melt
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Undersea Vent System Active for Ages

Deep at the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean, there is a huge and mysterious network of rock structures called the Lost City. Rock spires on the steep slopes of an undersea mountain stretch as high as 18-story buildings. Cracks in the rocks spit out warm fluids that are full of minerals. Scientists have recently uncovered new clues about the chemical workings of the Lost City. The research might help explain how life began. The search for life’s beginnings often focuses on bubbling cracks in the seafloor, called hydrothermal vents. Underwater volcanoes heat most vent systems. The Lost City is different. There, chemical reactions between seawater and rocks warm the oozing flow of mineral-rich liquids. Researchers from Switzerland analyzed sediment from the Lost City, which lies 2,500 km east of Bermuda. They found rock deposits on the chimneys that are 25,000 years old. However, white, feathery structures around the vents formed just in the last few decades. All together, the new data suggests that the Lost City’s vent system has been spewing warm fluids for at least 30,000 years. Tons of tiny microbes live near the vents, happy as clams. Studying them might help explain how the world’s first microbes formed. Finding the Lost City was only the first step. Many mysteries remain!—E. Sohn

Undersea Vent System Active for Ages
Undersea Vent System Active for Ages








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