Agriculture
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Getting the dirt on carbon
Middle school science adventures
Amphibians
Salamanders
Tree Frogs
Frogs and Toads
Animals
Ant Invasions Change the Rules
A Spider's Taste for Blood
Feeding School for Meerkats
Behavior
Copycat Monkeys
Girls are cool for school
The (kids') eyes have it
Birds
Condors
A Meal Plan for Birds
Parakeets
Chemistry and Materials
Sweeeet! The Skinny on Sugar Substitutes
Spinning Clay into Cotton
Flytrap Machine
Computers
Getting in Touch with Touch
Play for Science
New eyes to scan the skies
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Teeny Skull Reveals Ancient Ancestor
Fossil Forests
Middle school science adventures
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Flower family knows its roots
A Great Quake Coming?
On the Trail of America's Next Top Scientists
Environment
Spotty Survival
A Newspaper's Hidden Cost
Whale Watch
Finding the Past
Watching deep-space fireworks
Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist
Ancient Cave Behavior
Fish
Skates and Rays
Swordfish
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Food and Nutrition
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
The mercury in that tuna
Symbols from the Stone Age
GSAT English Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Pronouns
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
Monkeys Count
Math is a real brain bender
Prime Time for Cicadas
Human Body
Cell Phone Tattlers
Heart Revival
Flu Patrol
Invertebrates
Flies
Hermit Crabs
Jellyfish
Mammals
Gray Whale
Marsupials
Deers
Parents
Children and Media
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Project Music
Powering Ball Lightning
Plants
Surprise Visitor
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Springing forward
Reptiles
Asp
Copperhead Snakes
Crocodilians
Space and Astronomy
A Great Ball of Fire
A Star's Belt of Dust and Rocks
Cousin Earth
Technology and Engineering
Musclebots Take Some Steps
Smart Windows
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
Pronouns
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Where rivers run uphill
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Weather
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Add your Article

Troubles with Hubble

If your family car breaks down on the road, a roadside assistance crew will be sent immediately to make repairs. But how do you tackle emergency repairs on an orbiting space telescope hundreds of miles from Earth? That’s a problem that some NASA engineers are now working to solve. After 18 years of capturing images of nearby galaxies and newborn stars, the hard-working Hubble Space Telescope mysteriously stopped sending data in late September. The timing of the failure was unfortunate. It occurred just weeks before a shuttle mission to upgrade the aging space telescope was scheduled to blast off. That mission is now on hold until early next year while NASA engineers find ways to address the telescope’s recent problem. The problem stems from a failure inside a data formatting unit, a device designed to receive scientific data from the telescope's five main instruments and transmit this data to Earth. Without this unit, the Hubble is unable to capture and beam down information that is needed to produce the telescope’s breath-taking deep space images. NASA was prepared for such an emergency, though, and had stowed a copy of the formatting unit onboard. However, immediately switching over to this backup unit could create new problems, says Preston Burch, Hubble manager at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. For starters, the switchover would require engineers to electronically reconnect all five main instruments. The change might also blow a fuse or cause additional failures for Hubble. Instead, the Earth-bound engineers plan to tackle the job slowly. The first step, says Burch, is to practice making the switch on a replica of the Hubble system located on the ground at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. If all goes well on Earth, the engineers will then attempt to switch to the duplicate unit onboard the real Hubble in space. But even if it works, the switch to the duplicate system would be a short-term solution, Burch says. To ensure that Hubble keeps going as long as possible, NASA plans to send some “roadside assistance” to space. Astronauts may carry a duplicate data formatting unit into space when the recently delayed servicing mission launches next year. By replacing the failed data formatting unit with a new gadget, a spare unit could remain on Hubble in case of another failure, Burch says. Still, this is no ordinary emergency repair job. The astronauts will have to replace the unit during a two-hour spacewalk 612 kilometers (380 miles) above Earth.

Troubles with Hubble
Troubles with Hubble








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™