Agriculture
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Getting the dirt on carbon
Got Milk? How?
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Newts
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
Helping the Cause of Macaws
Chicken Talk
Thieves of a Feather
Behavior
Seeing red means danger ahead
Monkeys in the Mirror
Surprise Visitor
Birds
Woodpecker
Flamingos
Carnivorous Birds
Chemistry and Materials
A Diamond Polish for Ancient Tools
The memory of a material
Scientist Profile: Wally Gilbert
Computers
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Hubble trouble doubled
New twists for phantom limbs
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth
Fossil Fly from Antarctica
South America's sticky tar pits
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Life under Ice
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
The Pacific Ocean's Bald Spot
Environment
Shrimpy Invaders
City Trees Beat Country Trees
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Finding the Past
Chicken of the Sea
Stonehenge Settlement
Decoding a Beverage Jar
Fish
Whale Sharks
Mako Sharks
Skates
Food and Nutrition
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
Healing Honey
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Subject and Verb Agreement
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
Mastering The GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Math of the World
Math Naturals
Human Body
A Fix for Injured Knees
Spit Power
Dreaming makes perfect
Invertebrates
Mussels
Centipedes
Sponges
Mammals
Foxes
Beagles
Deers
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Road Bumps
Electric Backpack
The Particle Zoo
Plants
Plants Travel Wind Highways
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Stalking Plants by Scent
Reptiles
Komodo Dragons
Snakes
Tortoises
Space and Astronomy
Black Holes That Burp
Planet Hunters Nab Three More
Galaxies Divide Sharply Along Color Lines
Technology and Engineering
Crime Lab
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
What is a Preposition?
Pronouns
Transportation
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Ready, unplug, drive
Troubles with Hubble
Weather
Where rivers run uphill
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
Add your Article

Treating peanut allergy bit by bit

Peanut allergies are among the most common and most dangerous food allergies. A tiny exposure to peanuts can mean big trouble for a person with a peanut allergy, with symptoms ranging from sneezing or coughing to the constriction, or narrowing, of airways. Some people die from the exposure.

But a tiny exposure may help scientists find a cure. A recent study suggests that some children may be able to beat back their allergic reactions to peanuts by gradually introducing trace amounts of the nut into their diets. It’s too early to say for certain, so if you have a peanut allergy, do not try this at home. But the first results look promising.

Two teams of scientists have been experimenting on a group of 29 children, with an average age five years old, who are allergic to peanuts. At the beginning of the study, each kid received less than 1/1,000th of a peanut per day. (Imagine splitting a peanut into 1,000 parts!) Over the course of the study, the children gradually increased the amount of peanuts in their diets. At home, their parents sprinkled peanut powder on their food, and in the laboratory, the children drank solutions with peanuts dissolved inside.

Nine of the children have been receiving the treatment for two years. Five of those nine now appear to be free of their peanut allergies, says Wesley Burks, a pediatric allergist and immunologist at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, N.C. These five kids can eat peanuts with no problem. “They are putting peanuts in their diet,” Burks says.

Of those nine, the other four have not benefited as much from the therapy. Burks and his team will release data from the other 20 children in the study later this year.

The two teams of scientists are now doing a follow-up study on two groups of children with the allergy. Children in one group will receive the gradual peanut therapy, and the others will not. Burks and the other researchers hope this study will help them learn if the therapy truly works or not.

The study raises many questions, both from parents of children with the allergies and from other doctors. Scott Sicherer, an allergist at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City, asks, “Have we really cured the allergy, or are [the patients] just desensitized while they are getting the treatment?”

Scientists don’t understand why some people get peanut allergies and others don’t, but they’re scrambling to find a way to help people with the allergy. Because of the severity of a peanut allergy, scientists want to know as soon as possible. “This is very encouraging, but it’s not something you try at home,” says Sicherer.


Power words: (from the Yahoo! Kids Dictionary, which is also the The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

allergy: an abnormally high sensitivity to certain substances, such as pollens, foods or microorganisms. Common signs of allergy may include sneezing, itching and skin rashes.

allergist: a doctor specializing in the diagnosis and treatment of allergies

desensitize: to decrease the sensitivity or reaction to something

immunologist: a doctor specializing in the immune system, your body’s defense against illness

legume: a plant in the pea family, or a fruit or a seed from that plant. Legumes include peas, beans, peanuts and seeds.

Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™