Agriculture
Silk’s superpowers
Middle school science adventures
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Amphibians
Toads
Frogs and Toads
Bullfrogs
Animals
Glimpses of a Legendary Woodpecker
Crocodile Hearts
From Chimps to People
Behavior
Making Sense of Scents
Dino-bite!
Diving, Rolling, and Floating, Alligator Style
Birds
Doves
A Meal Plan for Birds
Pheasants
Chemistry and Materials
Makeup Science
Cold, colder and coldest ice
Fog Buster
Computers
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Play for Science
The Book of Life
Dinosaurs and Fossils
An Ancient Feathered Biplane
Dino-Dining Dinosaurs
Middle school science adventures
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Snowflakes and Avalanches
Hints of Life in Ancient Lava
Drilling Deep for Fuel
Environment
Will Climate Change Depose Monarchs?
Shrinking Fish
Swimming with Sharks and Stingrays
Finding the Past
An Ancient Childhood
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
A Long Trek to Asia
Fish
Eels
Freshwater Fish
Tilapia
Food and Nutrition
Chew for Health
Making good, brown fat
The Color of Health
GSAT English Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Order of Adjectives
Pronouns
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
Deep-space dancers
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Math of the World
Human Body
Smiles Turn Away Colds
Tapeworms and Drug Delivery
What the appendix is good for
Invertebrates
Scallops
Wasps
Mosquitos
Mammals
Chinchillas
Grizzly Bear
Tigers
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Children and Media
Physics
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Gaining a Swift Lift
Electric Backpack
Plants
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Stalking Plants by Scent
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Reptiles
Pythons
Box Turtles
Iguanas
Space and Astronomy
World of Three Suns
A Dead Star's Dusty Ring
A Smashing Display
Technology and Engineering
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
Shape Shifting
Reach for the Sky
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Ready, unplug, drive
Middle school science adventures
Robots on a Rocky Road
Weather
The solar system's biggest junkyard
A Dire Shortage of Water
Catching Some Rays
Add your Article

Training Your Brain to Feel Less Pain

Your brain controls your body, and your body affects your brain. Now, scientists have found a way to turn the system upside down. With practice, a new study suggests, people can use their minds to change the way their brains affect their bodies. In particular, by watching activity in a brain scan, people can train their brains to process pain differently and reduce the amount of pain that they feel. The researchers worked with 32 healthy volunteers, ages 18 to 37. To begin with, volunteers received a heat pulse to their legs. The heat pulses could vary in intensity. On a scale from one to 10 (with 10 being "the worst pain imaginable"), they had to report when the intensity of the pain that they felt was higher than 7. Using a brain-scanning machine called an fMRI scanner, the scientists were able to see that this level of pain sparked a lot of activity in a part of the brain called the rostral anterior cingulate cortex. Next, eight of the volunteers went through brain training. Scientists hooked them up to machines that allowed them to see what was going on in their own rostral anterior cingulate cortexes. An image of a flame grew when there was a lot of activity there and shrank when there was less. After 39 minutes of practice, the researchers found, volunteers were able to control the size of the flame and, hence, their pain levels, even with the same intensity of heat on their legs. Mental exercises, such as thinking about something besides the pain, seemed to help. The other 24 volunteers were also told to try to change the activity level in their rostral anterior cingulate cortexes, but they didn't get to see what was happening there. Sometimes, they were able to see brain activity in other parts of their brains or brain activity in other people's brains. Without direct feedback, though, they were unable to change the level of activity in the correct part of the brain or the amount of pain that they felt from the heat. In the final stages of their study, the scientists gave this type of brain training to eight people who suffer from chronic pain, which means they have recurring pain much of the time that gets in the way of their lives. By the end of the experiment, all of the patients reported feeling less pain when activity in the rostral anterior cingulate cortex went down. Chronic-pain patients who practiced doing other types of feedback didn't gain the same benefits. Scientists have been struggling to understand pain for a long time. This new research might help improve the lives of people who have to live with it.—E. Sohn

Training Your Brain to Feel Less Pain
Training Your Brain to Feel Less Pain








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™