Agriculture
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Middle school science adventures
Amphibians
Toads
Tree Frogs
Salamanders
Animals
Fishy Sounds
Sea Lilies on the Run
Lucky Survival for Black Cats
Behavior
How Much Babies Know
Seeing red means danger ahead
Wake Up, Sleepy Gene
Birds
Ibises
Rheas
Mockingbirds
Chemistry and Materials
Popping to Perfection
The chemistry of sleeplessness
Spinning Clay into Cotton
Computers
A New Look at Saturn's rings
It's a Small E-mail World After All
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dinosaur Eggs-citement
Fossil Fly from Antarctica
Hall of Dinos
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Coral Islands Survive a Tsunami
Plastic-munching microbes
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
Environment
Flu river
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
The Down Side of Keeping Clean
Finding the Past
Ancient Cave Behavior
Chicken of the Sea
Of Lice and Old Clothes
Fish
Pygmy Sharks
Catfish
Freshwater Fish
Food and Nutrition
The Color of Health
A Taste for Cheese
Strong Bones for Life
GSAT English Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Capitalization Rules
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Scholarship
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
It's a Math World for Animals
Math is a real brain bender
Human Body
Attacking Asthma
Foul Play?
Spitting Up Blobs to Get Around
Invertebrates
Dust Mites
Nautiluses
Leeches
Mammals
Humpback Whales
Aardvarks
African Hyenas
Parents
Children and Media
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Black Hole Journey
Road Bumps
Plants
Sweet, Sticky Science
Nature's Alphabet
Surprise Visitor
Reptiles
Garter Snakes
Chameleons
Rattlesnakes
Space and Astronomy
World of Three Suns
Galaxies Divide Sharply Along Color Lines
Catching a Comet's Tail
Technology and Engineering
Supersuits for Superheroes
Reach for the Sky
Weaving with Light
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Noun
Transportation
Revving Up Green Machines
Middle school science adventures
Reach for the Sky
Weather
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Earth's Poles in Peril
Add your Article

Training Your Brain to Feel Less Pain

Your brain controls your body, and your body affects your brain. Now, scientists have found a way to turn the system upside down. With practice, a new study suggests, people can use their minds to change the way their brains affect their bodies. In particular, by watching activity in a brain scan, people can train their brains to process pain differently and reduce the amount of pain that they feel. The researchers worked with 32 healthy volunteers, ages 18 to 37. To begin with, volunteers received a heat pulse to their legs. The heat pulses could vary in intensity. On a scale from one to 10 (with 10 being "the worst pain imaginable"), they had to report when the intensity of the pain that they felt was higher than 7. Using a brain-scanning machine called an fMRI scanner, the scientists were able to see that this level of pain sparked a lot of activity in a part of the brain called the rostral anterior cingulate cortex. Next, eight of the volunteers went through brain training. Scientists hooked them up to machines that allowed them to see what was going on in their own rostral anterior cingulate cortexes. An image of a flame grew when there was a lot of activity there and shrank when there was less. After 39 minutes of practice, the researchers found, volunteers were able to control the size of the flame and, hence, their pain levels, even with the same intensity of heat on their legs. Mental exercises, such as thinking about something besides the pain, seemed to help. The other 24 volunteers were also told to try to change the activity level in their rostral anterior cingulate cortexes, but they didn't get to see what was happening there. Sometimes, they were able to see brain activity in other parts of their brains or brain activity in other people's brains. Without direct feedback, though, they were unable to change the level of activity in the correct part of the brain or the amount of pain that they felt from the heat. In the final stages of their study, the scientists gave this type of brain training to eight people who suffer from chronic pain, which means they have recurring pain much of the time that gets in the way of their lives. By the end of the experiment, all of the patients reported feeling less pain when activity in the rostral anterior cingulate cortex went down. Chronic-pain patients who practiced doing other types of feedback didn't gain the same benefits. Scientists have been struggling to understand pain for a long time. This new research might help improve the lives of people who have to live with it.E. Sohn

Training Your Brain to Feel Less Pain
Training Your Brain to Feel Less Pain








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™