Agriculture
Got Milk? How?
Watering the Air
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Salamanders and Newts
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
Fishy Cleaners
Feeding School for Meerkats
Navigating by the Light of the Moon
Behavior
Mind-reading Machine
Homework blues
Video Game Violence
Birds
Songbirds
Hummingbirds
Waterfowl
Chemistry and Materials
Batteries built by Viruses
Screaming for Ice Cream
Smelly Traps for Lampreys
Computers
Fingerprint Evidence
Galaxies far, far, far away
A New Look at Saturn's rings
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino Babies
Big Fish in Ancient Waters
A Living Fossil
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Snowflakes and Avalanches
Digging into a Tsunami Disaster
The Pacific Ocean's Bald Spot
Environment
Indoor ozone stopper
Food Web Woes
An Ocean View's Downside
Finding the Past
Decoding a Beverage Jar
Stone Tablet May Solve Maya Mystery
The Taming of the Cat
Fish
Nurse Sharks
Saltwater Fish
Perches
Food and Nutrition
Making good, brown fat
The Essence of Celery
Symbols from the Stone Age
GSAT English Rules
Capitalization Rules
Order of Adjectives
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Scholarship
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Human Body
Cell Phone Tattlers
Tapeworms and Drug Delivery
Workouts: Does Stretching Help?
Invertebrates
Centipedes
Crustaceans
Caterpillars
Mammals
Gray Whale
Basset Hounds
Sun Bear
Parents
Children and Media
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Einstein's Skateboard
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Plants
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Fungus Hunt
Sweet, Sticky Science
Reptiles
Komodo Dragons
Crocodiles
Sea Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Mercury's magnetic twisters
Planet Hunters Nab Three More
An Earthlike Planet
Technology and Engineering
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Bionic Bacteria
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Verb?
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Robots on a Rocky Road
Robots on the Road, Again
Middle school science adventures
Weather
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
Add your Article

Traces of Ancient Campfires

It's hard to imagine going on a camping trip without a reliable source of fire. After all, how would you stay warm or cook your food? Our prehistoric ancestors probably realized the importance of fire long ago. New research suggests that inhabitants of an area near a lake in what's now northern Israel may have built fires in hearths as early as 750,000 years ago. If so, it would be the oldest known example in Asia or Europe of humans controlling fire. The evidence comes from clusters of flint fragments that have burn marks on them. The researchers, who are from Hebrew University in Jerusalem, suggest that the objects lie where an ancient population had built hearths. Nearby, the scientists also found burned seeds and charred pieces of wood. Animal bones and other clues in the area allowed the scientists to estimate the age of the remains. It looks like the area's inhabitants started making hearths nearly 790,000 years ago and continued doing so for 100,000 years. These ancient people probably used fire to make heat, prepare food, and keep predators away, the researchers say. Inhabitants of the Israeli site may not have been the first ones to make and keep fire, however. Some scientists have proposed that our prehistoric ancestors in Africa started using fire more than 1 million years ago. The new find is consistent with the idea that fire-keeping started in Africa before spreading to other parts of the world. Consider that the next time you savor a flame-broiled burger!E. Sohn

Traces of Ancient Campfires
Traces of Ancient Campfires








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™