Agriculture
Middle school science adventures
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Watching out for vultures
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Bullfrogs
Salamanders
Animals
Fishy Cleaners
Stunts for High-Diving Ants
Koalas, Up Close and Personal
Behavior
Lost Sight, Found Sound
Baby Number Whizzes
Pain Expectations
Birds
Pheasants
Pigeons
Quails
Chemistry and Materials
Watching out for vultures
These gems make their own way
Cold, colder and coldest ice
Computers
Middle school science adventures
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Programming with Alice
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dinosaur Dig
From Mammoth to Modern Elephant
Dinosaurs Grow Up
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Sky Dust Keeps Falling on Your Head
What is groundwater
Earth from the inside out
Environment
Plant Gas
The Wolf and the Cow
Lessons from a Lonely Tortoise
Finding the Past
The Taming of the Cat
Words of the Distant Past
Stonehenge Settlement
Fish
Catfish
Mako Sharks
Electric Ray
Food and Nutrition
Making good, brown fat
The Essence of Celery
Chocolate Rules
GSAT English Rules
Capitalization Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Whoever vs. Whomever
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
Math of the World
Prime Time for Cicadas
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Human Body
Taste Messenger
A Better Flu Shot
What the appendix is good for
Invertebrates
Leeches
Wasps
Worms
Mammals
African Mammals
Mouse
Minks
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Children and Media
Physics
Speedy stars
Electric Backpack
Project Music
Plants
The algae invasion
Making the most of a meal
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Reptiles
Boa Constrictors
Alligators
Cobras
Space and Astronomy
Intruder Alert: Sweeping Space for Dust
The two faces of Mars
Black Holes That Burp
Technology and Engineering
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
Reach for the Sky
Beyond Bar Codes
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Preposition?
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Flying the Hyper Skies
Robots on the Road, Again
Reach for the Sky
Weather
A Dire Shortage of Water
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Arctic Melt
Add your Article

Traces of Ancient Campfires

It's hard to imagine going on a camping trip without a reliable source of fire. After all, how would you stay warm or cook your food? Our prehistoric ancestors probably realized the importance of fire long ago. New research suggests that inhabitants of an area near a lake in what's now northern Israel may have built fires in hearths as early as 750,000 years ago. If so, it would be the oldest known example in Asia or Europe of humans controlling fire. The evidence comes from clusters of flint fragments that have burn marks on them. The researchers, who are from Hebrew University in Jerusalem, suggest that the objects lie where an ancient population had built hearths. Nearby, the scientists also found burned seeds and charred pieces of wood. Animal bones and other clues in the area allowed the scientists to estimate the age of the remains. It looks like the area's inhabitants started making hearths nearly 790,000 years ago and continued doing so for 100,000 years. These ancient people probably used fire to make heat, prepare food, and keep predators away, the researchers say. Inhabitants of the Israeli site may not have been the first ones to make and keep fire, however. Some scientists have proposed that our prehistoric ancestors in Africa started using fire more than 1 million years ago. The new find is consistent with the idea that fire-keeping started in Africa before spreading to other parts of the world. Consider that the next time you savor a flame-broiled burger!E. Sohn

Traces of Ancient Campfires
Traces of Ancient Campfires








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™