Agriculture
Seeds of the Future
Getting the dirt on carbon
Fast-flying fungal spores
Amphibians
Toads
Poison Dart Frogs
Tree Frogs
Animals
Not Slippery When Wet
Roach Love Songs
Lives of a Mole Rat
Behavior
Making Sense of Scents
A brain-boosting video game
Memory by Hypnosis
Birds
Storks
Seagulls
Nightingales
Chemistry and Materials
The metal detector in your mouth
Small but WISE
Moon Crash, Splash
Computers
Lighting goes digital
Programming with Alice
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Dinosaurs and Fossils
The man who rocked biology to its core
Some Dinos Dined on Grass
South America's sticky tar pits
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Getting the dirt on carbon
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Earth Rocks On
Environment
Fishing for Fun Takes Toll
Sea Otters, Kelp, and Killer Whales
The Wolf and the Cow
Finding the Past
A Long Haul
Stone Age Sole Survivors
Ancient Cave Behavior
Fish
Angler Fish
Swordfish
Sting Ray
Food and Nutrition
Food for Life
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
Yummy bugs
GSAT English Rules
Capitalization Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Mastering The GSAT Exam
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
Detecting True Art
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Human Body
Germ Zapper
Running with Sneaker Science
A Better Flu Shot
Invertebrates
Sea Urchin
Spiders
Clams
Mammals
Labradors
Orangutans
Cheetah
Parents
Children and Media
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
How children learn
Physics
Einstein's Skateboard
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Plants
Making the most of a meal
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Nature's Alphabet
Reptiles
Box Turtles
Pythons
Boa Constrictors
Space and Astronomy
An Earthlike Planet
Intruder Alert: Sweeping Space for Dust
Mercury's magnetic twisters
Technology and Engineering
Musclebots Take Some Steps
Toy Challenge
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Pronouns
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Flying the Hyper Skies
Reach for the Sky
Middle school science adventures
Weather
Where rivers run uphill
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Add your Article

The Smell of Trust

Let's say you find yourself with a pile of extra money. You meet a banker who tells you to hand it all over to him. He'll invest it and make you rich. "Trust me," he says. Do you? Whether or not you decide to trust strangers may have something to do with a brain chemical called oxytocin, a new study suggests. Simply smelling some of the chemical is enough to make people more trusting in financial situations, say researchers from the University of Zurich in Switzerland. Animal studies in the past have shown that oxytocin is involved in bonding between mates and between mothers and offspring. One theory is that the hormone inspires trust, which is essential for friendship, love, families, and other relationships. It might also help people accept risks when it comes to money and other situations. To test this idea in people, the researchers paid 58 male college students to play a risky investment game. First, the researchers put the men into pairs. One member of each pair played the role of investor. The other was the trustee, or the person the investor gave his money to. Every participant received 12 tokens worth 32 cents each. They would get cash for what they had left at the end of the game. The investors had to decide how many tokens to give to the trustees. They knew that however much they handed over would quadruple in value. The twist was that the trustee in each pair would decide how much of the profits to give back to the investor. Before the game began, some of the investors were given oxytocin to sniff. Others sniffed an inactive substance. Nobody knew which one they received. In the oxytocin-sniffing group, half the men gave all of their tokens to the trustees. The rest gave most of their tokens away. In contrast, only 20 percent of the non-oxytocin group gave all of their tokens away. Oxytocin didn't affect how trustees behaved. The study has sparked worries that oxytocin sprays could be used to manipulate people into trusting political candidates or helping criminals. However, some researchers suggest that oxytocin might be released in your brain anyway when you see well-designed ads or experience slick marketing. Most exciting of all for researchers are the medical possibilities. If they can understand how oxytocin works in the brain, they might be able to help people with mental illnesses that make them afraid of social situations.E. Sohn

The Smell of Trust
The Smell of Trust








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™