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Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Springing forward
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
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A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Return of the Lost Limbs
Gliders in the Family
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Mice sense each other's fear
Mind-reading Machine
Contemplating thought
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Small but WISE
Atom Hauler
Spinning Clay into Cotton
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Secrets of an Ancient Computer
A New Look at Saturn's rings
A Classroom of the Mind
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A Rainforest Trapped in Amber
Hunting by Sucking, Long Ago
Dino Takeout for Mammals
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E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
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In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
The Pacific Ocean's Bald Spot
Hints of Life in Ancient Lava
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Plastic Meals for Seals
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Blooming Jellies
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Oldest Writing in the New World
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Meet your mysterious relative
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How Super Are Superfruits?
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
Sponges' secret weapon
GSAT English Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Whoever vs. Whomever
Who vs. That vs. Which
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Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Exam Preparation
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
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GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Human Body
Spit Power
Tapeworms and Drug Delivery
Prime Time for Broken Bones
Invertebrates
Flatworms
Oysters
Grasshoppers
Mammals
Dingoes
Grizzly Bear
Elk
Parents
Children and Media
How children learn
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Electric Backpack
One ring around them all
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Plants
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Fastest Plant on Earth
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Reptiles
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Space and Astronomy
Killers from Outer Space
Cool as a Jupiter
Super Star Cluster in the Neighborhood
Technology and Engineering
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
Beyond Bar Codes
Smart Windows
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Verb?
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Ready, unplug, drive
Robots on a Rocky Road
Middle school science adventures
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Recipe for a Hurricane
Where rivers run uphill
Arctic Melt
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The Particle Zoo

Particles are the building blocks of matter, and matter makes up everything you can see. The Earth and moon are matter. So is your body, your computer’s screen, even the air you breathe. Which means they’re all made of particles. Particles are the building blocks of matter, and matter makes up everything you can see. The Earth and moon are matter. So is your body, your computer’s screen, even the air you breathe. Which means they’re all made of particles. Lots and lots of particles, of all different kinds, stuck together. Atoms, which used to be considered the smallest unit of matter, are made from particles too. Just how small is an atom? That’s a tricky question, since different atoms have different sizes and atoms are mostly empty space. But here’s one way to think about it: Let’s say you wanted to fill up a baseball-sized bowl with gold atoms. You’d need roughly twice as many of these atoms as it would take to fill an Earth-sized bowl with baseballs. Particles that are even smaller than an atom are called “subatomic.” The main subatomic particles that make up atoms are protons, electrons and neutrons. But some of these particles are also made of even smaller particles. Protons and neutrons, for example, are made of subatomic particles called “quarks.” There are six kinds of quarks, each with a weird name: up, down, strange, charm, top and bottom. Dozens of types of subatomic particle exist, and scientists suspect there may be still more to discover. When a new type emerges, scientists tend to give them pretty odd-sounding names. To date, we’ve got bosons, fermions, leptons, muons, pions, neutrinos, photons, gluons, and gravitons. Neutrinos are unusually weird because they have almost no mass and they fly through space at almost the speed of light. Three types exist: muon neutrinos, electron neutrinos and tau neutrinos. And the strangest particle of all: the tachyon. It’s considered “hypothetical,” which means it might not even exist. If it does, it can go faster than the speed of light and travel back in time. No wonder some physicists refer to these — the smallest inhabitants of our universe — as their “particle zoo.”

The Particle Zoo
The Particle Zoo








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