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Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Salamanders
Tree Frogs
Animals
How to Silence a Cricket
Killer Flatworms Hunt with Poison
Fishing for Giant Squid
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The Other Side of the Zoo Fence
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Taking a Spill for Science
Birds
Waterfowl
Nightingales
Woodpecker
Chemistry and Materials
Silk’s superpowers
Sugary Survival Skill
Heaviest named element is official
Computers
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
A New Look at Saturn's rings
Getting in Touch with Touch
Dinosaurs and Fossils
The bug that may have killed a dinosaur
From Mammoth to Modern Elephant
Message in a dinosaur's teeth
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Wave of Destruction
Earth from the inside out
Environment
Watching for Wildfires in Yellowstone
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
The Down Side of Keeping Clean
Finding the Past
Meet your mysterious relative
Stone Age Sole Survivors
Early Maya Writing
Fish
Tiger Sharks
Lampreys
Halibut
Food and Nutrition
Healing Honey
Chew for Health
The mercury in that tuna
GSAT English Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Whoever vs. Whomever
Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Human Body
Sleeping Soundly for a Longer Life
Don't Eat That Sandwich!
From Stem Cell to Any Cell
Invertebrates
Crustaceans
Millipedes
Krill
Mammals
Sperm Whale
Little Brown Bats
Glider
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Project Music
One ring around them all
Dreams of Floating in Space
Plants
Fungus Hunt
The algae invasion
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Reptiles
Geckos
Turtles
Gila Monsters
Space and Astronomy
Roving the Red Planet
Wrong-way planets do gymnastics
Saturn's New Moons
Technology and Engineering
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
Slip Sliming Away
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Problems with Prepositions
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Robots on the Road, Again
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Weather
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Arctic Melt
A Dire Shortage of Water
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The Particle Zoo

Particles are the building blocks of matter, and matter makes up everything you can see. The Earth and moon are matter. So is your body, your computer’s screen, even the air you breathe. Which means they’re all made of particles. Particles are the building blocks of matter, and matter makes up everything you can see. The Earth and moon are matter. So is your body, your computer’s screen, even the air you breathe. Which means they’re all made of particles. Lots and lots of particles, of all different kinds, stuck together. Atoms, which used to be considered the smallest unit of matter, are made from particles too. Just how small is an atom? That’s a tricky question, since different atoms have different sizes and atoms are mostly empty space. But here’s one way to think about it: Let’s say you wanted to fill up a baseball-sized bowl with gold atoms. You’d need roughly twice as many of these atoms as it would take to fill an Earth-sized bowl with baseballs. Particles that are even smaller than an atom are called “subatomic.” The main subatomic particles that make up atoms are protons, electrons and neutrons. But some of these particles are also made of even smaller particles. Protons and neutrons, for example, are made of subatomic particles called “quarks.” There are six kinds of quarks, each with a weird name: up, down, strange, charm, top and bottom. Dozens of types of subatomic particle exist, and scientists suspect there may be still more to discover. When a new type emerges, scientists tend to give them pretty odd-sounding names. To date, we’ve got bosons, fermions, leptons, muons, pions, neutrinos, photons, gluons, and gravitons. Neutrinos are unusually weird because they have almost no mass and they fly through space at almost the speed of light. Three types exist: muon neutrinos, electron neutrinos and tau neutrinos. And the strangest particle of all: the tachyon. It’s considered “hypothetical,” which means it might not even exist. If it does, it can go faster than the speed of light and travel back in time. No wonder some physicists refer to these — the smallest inhabitants of our universe — as their “particle zoo.”

The Particle Zoo
The Particle Zoo








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