Watching out for vultures
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Getting the dirt on carbon
Frogs and Toads
Hot Pepper, Hot Spider
Professor Ant
A Light Delay
Monkeys in the Mirror
Fish needs see-through head
Chemistry and Materials
The Taste of Bubbles
Undercover Detectives
Supersonic Splash
Look into My Eyes
Galaxies far, far, far away
Nonstop Robot
Dinosaurs and Fossils
The bug that may have killed a dinosaur
From Mammoth to Modern Elephant
Downsized Dinosaurs
E Learning Jamaica
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
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Bugs with Gas
Digging into a Tsunami Disaster
Surf Watch
Nanosponges Soak Up Pollutants
A 'Book' on Every Living Thing
Little Bits of Trouble
Finding the Past
A Plankhouse Past
A Long Trek to Asia
A Long Haul
Great White Shark
Hammerhead Sharks
Electric Ray
Food and Nutrition
Chocolate Rules
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
Packing Fat
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Problems with Prepositions
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
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Setting a Prime Number Record
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
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Human Body
A Sour Taste in Your Mouth
A Fix for Injured Knees
Football Scrapes and Nasty Infections
Cocker Spaniels
Children and Media
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
IceCube Science
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
One ring around them all
Bright Blooms That Glow
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Farms sprout in cities
Copperhead Snakes
Sea Turtles
Space and Astronomy
A Very Distant Planet Says "Cheese"
Phantom Energy and the Big Rip
World of Three Suns
Technology and Engineering
Young Scientists Take Flight
Weaving with Light
Algae Motors
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Earth's Poles in Peril
Warmest Year on Record
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The Particle Zoo

Particles are the building blocks of matter, and matter makes up everything you can see. The Earth and moon are matter. So is your body, your computer’s screen, even the air you breathe. Which means they’re all made of particles. Particles are the building blocks of matter, and matter makes up everything you can see. The Earth and moon are matter. So is your body, your computer’s screen, even the air you breathe. Which means they’re all made of particles. Lots and lots of particles, of all different kinds, stuck together. Atoms, which used to be considered the smallest unit of matter, are made from particles too. Just how small is an atom? That’s a tricky question, since different atoms have different sizes and atoms are mostly empty space. But here’s one way to think about it: Let’s say you wanted to fill up a baseball-sized bowl with gold atoms. You’d need roughly twice as many of these atoms as it would take to fill an Earth-sized bowl with baseballs. Particles that are even smaller than an atom are called “subatomic.” The main subatomic particles that make up atoms are protons, electrons and neutrons. But some of these particles are also made of even smaller particles. Protons and neutrons, for example, are made of subatomic particles called “quarks.” There are six kinds of quarks, each with a weird name: up, down, strange, charm, top and bottom. Dozens of types of subatomic particle exist, and scientists suspect there may be still more to discover. When a new type emerges, scientists tend to give them pretty odd-sounding names. To date, we’ve got bosons, fermions, leptons, muons, pions, neutrinos, photons, gluons, and gravitons. Neutrinos are unusually weird because they have almost no mass and they fly through space at almost the speed of light. Three types exist: muon neutrinos, electron neutrinos and tau neutrinos. And the strangest particle of all: the tachyon. It’s considered “hypothetical,” which means it might not even exist. If it does, it can go faster than the speed of light and travel back in time. No wonder some physicists refer to these — the smallest inhabitants of our universe — as their “particle zoo.”

The Particle Zoo
The Particle Zoo

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