Agriculture
Getting the dirt on carbon
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Springing forward
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Frogs and Toads
Tree Frogs
Animals
Bee Disease
A Whale's Amazing Tooth
Sleepless at Sea
Behavior
The Science Fair Circuit
Reading Body Language
Video Game Violence
Birds
Quails
Ibises
Emus
Chemistry and Materials
Atomic Drive
Moon Crash, Splash
Smelly Traps for Lampreys
Computers
Middle school science adventures
The Shape of the Internet
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Dinosaurs and Fossils
From Mammoth to Modern Elephant
A Living Fossil
Some Dinos Dined on Grass
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Meteorites may have sparked life on Earth
The Rise of Yellowstone
Environment
Swimming with Sharks and Stingrays
Animal CSI or from Science Lab to Crime Lab
An Ocean View's Downside
Finding the Past
Traces of Ancient Campfires
Unearthing Ancient Astronomy
Words of the Distant Past
Fish
Electric Catfish
Seahorses
Manta Rays
Food and Nutrition
Making good, brown fat
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Who vs. Whom
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
Math is a real brain bender
Monkeys Count
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Human Body
Football Scrapes and Nasty Infections
Workouts: Does Stretching Help?
From Stem Cell to Any Cell
Invertebrates
Sea Urchin
Tarantula
Mosquitos
Mammals
Mule
Dogs
Cats
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
How children learn
Physics
Powering Ball Lightning
Electric Backpack
Speedy stars
Plants
Sweet, Sticky Science
Springing forward
Fast-flying fungal spores
Reptiles
Boa Constrictors
Turtles
Geckos
Space and Astronomy
Holes in Martian moon mystery
The two faces of Mars
Sun Flips Out to Flip-Flop
Technology and Engineering
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
Smart Windows
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Pronouns
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Middle school science adventures
Weather
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
A Change in Climate
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Add your Article

The Particle Zoo

Particles are the building blocks of matter, and matter makes up everything you can see. The Earth and moon are matter. So is your body, your computer’s screen, even the air you breathe. Which means they’re all made of particles. Particles are the building blocks of matter, and matter makes up everything you can see. The Earth and moon are matter. So is your body, your computer’s screen, even the air you breathe. Which means they’re all made of particles. Lots and lots of particles, of all different kinds, stuck together. Atoms, which used to be considered the smallest unit of matter, are made from particles too. Just how small is an atom? That’s a tricky question, since different atoms have different sizes and atoms are mostly empty space. But here’s one way to think about it: Let’s say you wanted to fill up a baseball-sized bowl with gold atoms. You’d need roughly twice as many of these atoms as it would take to fill an Earth-sized bowl with baseballs. Particles that are even smaller than an atom are called “subatomic.” The main subatomic particles that make up atoms are protons, electrons and neutrons. But some of these particles are also made of even smaller particles. Protons and neutrons, for example, are made of subatomic particles called “quarks.” There are six kinds of quarks, each with a weird name: up, down, strange, charm, top and bottom. Dozens of types of subatomic particle exist, and scientists suspect there may be still more to discover. When a new type emerges, scientists tend to give them pretty odd-sounding names. To date, we’ve got bosons, fermions, leptons, muons, pions, neutrinos, photons, gluons, and gravitons. Neutrinos are unusually weird because they have almost no mass and they fly through space at almost the speed of light. Three types exist: muon neutrinos, electron neutrinos and tau neutrinos. And the strangest particle of all: the tachyon. It’s considered “hypothetical,” which means it might not even exist. If it does, it can go faster than the speed of light and travel back in time. No wonder some physicists refer to these — the smallest inhabitants of our universe — as their “particle zoo.”

The Particle Zoo
The Particle Zoo








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™