Agriculture
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Poison Dart Frogs
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
Jay Watch
Navigating by the Light of the Moon
Thieves of a Feather
Behavior
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Swine flu goes global
Diving, Rolling, and Floating, Alligator Style
Birds
Storks
Kiwis
Hawks
Chemistry and Materials
Supersonic Splash
Butterfly Wings and Waterproof Coats
Fog Buster
Computers
Galaxies far, far, far away
Galaxies on the go
Hubble trouble doubled
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Hall of Dinos
Did Dinosaurs Do Handstands?
Dino Babies
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Undersea Vent System Active for Ages
Rocking the House
Snowflakes and Avalanches
Environment
Bald Eagles Forever
Food Web Woes
Sounds and Silence
Finding the Past
Your inner Neandertal
A Long Haul
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
Fish
Halibut
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Sting Ray
Food and Nutrition
The Essence of Celery
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
Healing Honey
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Who vs. Whom
Pronouns
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Prime Time for Cicadas
Math is a real brain bender
Human Body
Heart Revival
Remembering Facts and Feelings
Football Scrapes and Nasty Infections
Invertebrates
Squid
Shrimps
Walking Sticks
Mammals
Weasels
Ponies
African Hippopotamus
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Electric Backpack
Project Music
One ring around them all
Plants
Sweet, Sticky Science
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Flower family knows its roots
Reptiles
Geckos
Copperhead Snakes
Box Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Intruder Alert: Sweeping Space for Dust
An Earthlike Planet
Phantom Energy and the Big Rip
Technology and Engineering
Shape Shifting
Smart Windows
A Satellite of Your Own
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
What is a Verb?
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Reach for the Sky
Troubles with Hubble
Robots on the Road, Again
Weather
Warmest Year on Record
Watering the Air
Earth's Poles in Peril
Add your Article

The newest superheavy in town

Scientists around the world are on a quest to find all the elements possible in the universe. Everything is made of elements, so understanding elements is a way of understanding all the matter around us. Some of these elements, hydrogen or oxygen for example, can be easily found on Earth. Others, especially atoms that are heavier than uranium, are hard to study. They have to be made in the lab and, even then, usually decay, or break down into other smaller atoms, right after they’re created.Recently, a team of physicists from Russia and the United States created a never-before-seen superheavy element in the laboratory. Right now, it’s known simply as “element 117” or “ununseptium.” The experiment was led by Yuri Oganessian, a physicist at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna, Russia. Sigurd Hofmann, a nuclear physicist in Darmstadt, Germany, told Science News that the results are “convincing.” Those names for the element are not official. A new element doesn’t receive an official name until more teams of scientists can also make it in the laboratory. This stage of the scientific process, called verification, is important to make sure that the original experiment was not a fluke. Verification can take a long time. In February of this year, for example, element 112 finally received the official name “Copernicum,” and it had been first identified in 1996. At the center of every atom is a nucleus, and inside the nucleus are particles called neutrons and protons. Each element has a characteristic number of protons, and inside an atom of the newly created element are 117 protons, which is why it is called “element 117.”The new element was created at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in a machine called a cyclotron. A cyclotron may sound like a roller coaster — and for atoms, it is a wild ride. A cyclotron smashes together different kinds of elements at super-high speeds, and scientists watch to see what happens just after the crash. In this case, the scientists used a cyclotron to bombard atoms of berkelium with atoms of calcium. Specifically, an isotope, or variation, of berkelium (berkelium-249) was bombarded with an isotope of calcium, calcium-48. The calcium isotope had 28 neutrons compared with calcium’s usual 20. Add that to the usual 20 protons in calcium, and you have calcium-48. Berkelium is a heavy element that does not occur in nature — it also had to be created in a laboratory. In fact, berkelium was created in a laboratory in Tennessee, then transported around the world to Russia for this experiment. And what an experiment it was: For 150 days, the scientists smashed calcium-48 atoms into berkelium-249 atoms, and at the end of the experiment the team had created exactly six atoms of element 117, according to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, where some of the other scientists on the project work. And for all that work, those six atoms didn’t last very long: After a tiny fraction of a second, they had all decayed. A heavy atom decays when its nucleus breaks apart, and the heavy atom breaks down into smaller atoms, each having fewer protons in their nuclei than were in the original hefty atom. It may seem like the researchers went through a lot of work for six rare atoms that quickly vanished, but the scientists are excited. They’ve been looking for element 117 for some time — both elements 116 and 118 have already been made in a laboratory, but until now no one had seen element 117. Almost all heavy elements decay quickly, but scientists are excited because superheavy elements such as 116, 117 and 118 don’t vanish as quickly as other superheavies. Scientists have been hoping to find a group of these atoms together. Such a group would be a step toward finding an “island of stability” on the Periodic Table, and element 117 may be part of the group.

The newest superheavy in town
The newest superheavy in town








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™