Agriculture
Silk’s superpowers
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Toads
Salamanders
Animals
Polar Bears in Trouble
Staying Away from Sick Lobsters
Tool Use Comes Naturally to Crows
Behavior
A Recipe for Happiness
Memory by Hypnosis
Math is a real brain bender
Birds
Kiwis
Flightless Birds
Woodpecker
Chemistry and Materials
Salt secrets
The chemistry of sleeplessness
Cold, colder and coldest ice
Computers
Games with a Purpose
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Message in a dinosaur's teeth
Fossil Fly from Antarctica
Ferocious Growth Spurts
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Hints of Life in Ancient Lava
Riding to Earth's Core
Distant Quake Changes Geyser Eruptions
Environment
A 'Book' on Every Living Thing
Hazy with a Chance of Sunshine
Missing Tigers in India
Finding the Past
Decoding a Beverage Jar
Stone Age Sole Survivors
A Plankhouse Past
Fish
Mako Sharks
Pygmy Sharks
Hagfish
Food and Nutrition
Symbols from the Stone Age
A Taste for Cheese
Yummy bugs
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Problems with Prepositions
Pronouns
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
Losing with Heads or Tails
Detecting True Art
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
Human Body
A Long Trek to Asia
Running with Sneaker Science
Sun Screen
Invertebrates
Millipedes
Giant Squid
Flatworms
Mammals
Bison
Elk
Asiatic Bears
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
How children learn
Physics
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Powering Ball Lightning
Plants
Farms sprout in cities
Making the most of a meal
Nature's Alphabet
Reptiles
Turtles
Geckos
Anacondas
Space and Astronomy
Planet Hunters Nab Three More
Saturn's New Moons
An Icy Blob of Fluff
Technology and Engineering
Toy Challenge
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Charged cars that would charge
Troubles with Hubble
Robots on a Rocky Road
Weather
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Add your Article

The hungry blob at the edge of the universe

Using a telescope atop a Hawaiian mountain, astronomers recently caught sight of an enormous, newfound glowing object in deep, deep space. If you were an astronomer, what would you call such a thing? How about a “blob”? Technically, the object is called a Lyman-alpha blob, and scientists aren’t exactly sure what it is. But they have a guess. Astronomer Masami Ouchi, of the Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science in Pasadena, Calif led the team that identified the blob. He and his colleagues think it may be a distant galaxy — a collection of stars, gas and dust — caught in the act of a feeding frenzy. Astronomers have different theories to explain how blobs like Ouchi’s came into being. Some suggest that Lyman-alpha blobs are smaller galaxies merging together into one larger galaxy. Other theories suggest cold gas streaming into the galaxy is essentially “feeding” it. Still other astronomers suspect that the glowing blob is a cloud of gas heated by a nearby supermassive black hole. The galaxy is 12.9 billion light-years from Earth. Light travels at about 186,000 miles per second, so one light-year is the equivalent of about 5.9 trillion miles. The giant blob is very, very far away, about 76.1 billion trillion miles away, in case you’re counting. In fact, it’s so far away that it’s the fourth most distant object ever observed. When we see light from a distant object in the sky — say, a star — we’re not seeing the object as it is. We’re seeing the object as it was when it emitted the light we’re seeing now. For example, light takes about eight minutes to travel from the sun to Earth, so when you see the sun, you actually see it as it was eight minutes ago. In other words, to look into space is to look back in time. Because the newly discovered blob is 12.9 billion light-years away, it is at least 12.9 billion years old. The universe itself is believed to be about 13 or 14 billion years old, so this blob came into being not long after. The blob is about 55,000 light-years across, or about half the diameter of our own galaxy, the Milky Way. To observe the blob, Ouchi and his team used a special telescope that is able to see infrared light coming from space. Infrared light is made of waves with wavelengths that we cannot see with the naked eye. We can feel these waves, though: “Far” infrared radiation feels like heat. According to Ouchi’s infrared measurements, the number of stars in the blob is equivalent to 40 billion suns. And that number is likely to keep growing since the scientists think the blob is a young galaxy in a growth

The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™