Agriculture
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Middle school science adventures
Watching out for vultures
Amphibians
Toads
Poison Dart Frogs
Newts
Animals
Hearing Whales
Assembling the Tree of Life
Crocodile Hearts
Behavior
How Much Babies Know
Brain cells take a break
Memory by Hypnosis
Birds
Pheasants
Birds We Eat
Hummingbirds
Chemistry and Materials
Moon Crash, Splash
Sweeeet! The Skinny on Sugar Substitutes
Sugary Survival Skill
Computers
Look into My Eyes
New eyes to scan the skies
Small but WISE
Dinosaurs and Fossils
The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs
Dinosaur Dig
Supersight for a Dino King
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Getting the dirt on carbon
On the Trail of America's Next Top Scientists
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
Environment
Hazy with a Chance of Sunshine
An Ocean View's Downside
The Wolf and the Cow
Finding the Past
Unearthing Ancient Astronomy
A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?
Digging Up Stone Age Art
Fish
Skates and Rays
Tiger Sharks
Bull Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Building a Food Pyramid
How Super Are Superfruits?
Strong Bones for Life
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Problems with Prepositions
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Prime Time for Cicadas
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Human Body
Don't Eat That Sandwich!
Teen Brains, Under Construction
Attacking Asthma
Invertebrates
Millipedes
Tapeworms
Horseshoe Crabs
Mammals
Wildcats
Rabbits
Spectacled Bear
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
How children learn
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Gaining a Swift Lift
IceCube Science
Project Music
Plants
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Fastest Plant on Earth
Stalking Plants by Scent
Reptiles
Reptiles
Tortoises
Chameleons
Space and Astronomy
Chaos Among the Planets
A Very Distant Planet Says "Cheese"
Dark Galaxy
Technology and Engineering
Searching for Alien Life
Algae Motors
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Noun
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Robots on the Road, Again
How to Fly Like a Bat
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Weather
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Recipe for a Hurricane
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Add your Article

The hottest soup in New York

This winter has been a season of breaking records. Last month, athletes at the winter Olympic games in Vancouver broke sports records. A few weeks before that, record-breaking amounts of snow fell on the eastern and southern United States. And on February 15, scientists announced in Washington, D.C., that they had broken another record — for the highest temperature ever reached in a laboratory. That new record is 4 trillion degrees Celsius (that’s 7.2 trillion degrees Fahrenheit). By doing experiments at that temperature, scientists hope to study what happened just after the universe was born. Four trillion degrees Celsius is 250,000 times hotter than the hottest part of the sun, and probably close to the temperature of the universe right after the Big Bang, the birth of the universe.The hot stuff is called a quark-gluon plasma, and scientists found it at the Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island, N.Y. Using a giant instrument called the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, or RHIC, the scientists zoomed two gold atoms through a ring that is 2.4 miles around and smashed the atoms together — and then watched to see what came out. There was so much energy in the crash that the atoms, in a way, melted.As temperatures climb, most solids melt into liquids, and then the liquids become gas. (Some solids may go straight to gas if the conditions are right.) Ice becomes liquid water at 0º Celsius (32º Fahrenheit). At 100º C (212º F), liquid water boils into water vapor. Compared to other substances, water’s melting and boiling points are mild: Tungsten, a material used in light bulbs, doesn’t melt until 3,410º C (6,800º F). That temperature is freezing compared to 4 trillion degrees C. At that temperature, atoms can break apart — and parts inside an atom can break apart — and then the tiny particles inside those parts can break apart. Think of an atom as a set of nesting dolls. When the largest, outer doll breaks apart, there’s another, smaller doll inside. And when that doll breaks apart … surprise! There’s another doll inside. Similarly, at the center of every atom is the nucleus. Inside the nucleus are particles called protons and neutrons. And inside protons and neutrons are even smaller particles called quarks. Quarks are held together thanks to another kind of particle called gluons. (Gluons help to “glue” the particle together.) The hot stuff produced at Brookhaven is a quark-gluon plasma and it spills out like a soup made of quarks and gluons. The quark-gluon plasma is a new type of matter that’s unlike solid, liquid or gas — but it kind of behaves like a liquid. “We are extremely anxious to find out how this works,” Barbara Jacak told Science News. “Why is it a liquid?” Jacak works at Stony Brook University in New York and is one of the scientists working on the project at Brookhaven. She helped take the plasma’s temperature. That was a difficult task because it’s hard to measure things that small. The plasma only existed for about one-trillionth of a trillionth of a second, and it was tiny, about one-trillionth of a centimeter across. It was a very small piece of space that was super hot for a very short amount of time. In other words, you can’t just put a thermometer in it, Jacak says. To take the temperature, the researchers watched it glow. A hot iron rod changes color from red to yellow to white as it heats up. In a similar way, the colors of light coming from the plasma changed. Based on what colors of light the soup emitted, the team figured out that the substance had reached the 4-trillion-degree record. By studying these kinds of super-hot temperatures, scientists hope to learn more about how the universe formed. The quark-gluon plasma may look a lot like the hot and heavy goo that existed in the universe right after the Big Bang. Experiments such as those at Brookhaven may help us understand what happened at the very beginning of the universe. But there’s a lot of work to be done, says scientist Chris Quigg of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, Ill. “These are very early days,” he told Science News. “Like many good observations, this opens up many questions.”

The hottest soup in New York
The hottest soup in New York








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™