Agriculture
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Tree Frogs
Frogs and Toads
Animals
Sleepless at Sea
Bee Heat Cooks Invaders
Helping the Cause of Macaws
Behavior
Internet Generation
A Recipe for Happiness
Seeing red means danger ahead
Birds
Vultures
Ospreys
Ducks
Chemistry and Materials
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Revving Up Green Machines
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Computers
Games with a Purpose
The Book of Life
Look into My Eyes
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Digging for Ancient DNA
Early Birds Ready to Rumble
The bug that may have killed a dinosaur
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
On the Trail of America's Next Top Scientists
Deep History
The Rise of Yellowstone
Environment
An Ocean View's Downside
Nanosponges Soak Up Pollutants
Alien Invasions
Finding the Past
A Plankhouse Past
Big Woman of the Distant Past
Your inner Neandertal
Fish
Freshwater Fish
Skates
Flashlight Fishes
Food and Nutrition
Sponges' secret weapon
How Super Are Superfruits?
Chew for Health
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Capitalization Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
Losing with Heads or Tails
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Human Body
Football Scrapes and Nasty Infections
Smiles Turn Away Colds
Music in the Brain
Invertebrates
Ants
Lobsters
Tapeworms
Mammals
Aardvarks
Spectacled Bear
Cats
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Invisibility Ring
Gaining a Swift Lift
Road Bumps
Plants
Underwater Jungles
Surprise Visitor
A Giant Flower's New Family
Reptiles
Chameleons
Pythons
Gila Monsters
Space and Astronomy
Ready, Set, Supernova
The two faces of Mars
Slip-sliding away
Technology and Engineering
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
A Light Delay
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Reach for the Sky
Middle school science adventures
Troubles with Hubble
Weather
Recipe for a Hurricane
Watering the Air
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Add your Article

The History of Meow

My cat, Abigail, acts like a wild animal sometimes—dashing around the house and pouncing on imaginary prey. A new study helps me better understand her behavior. It traces the history of the housecat to wildcats that lived thousands of years ago in the Near East (an area that today includes Israel, Turkey, and Jordan). Wildcats are a wild species of cat that is native to parts of Europe, Asia, and Africa. Researchers from the National Cancer Institute in Frederick, Md., and labs in six other countries analyzed the genetic material DNA from nearly 1,000 modern cats. The animals they studied included show cats raised for competitions, cats from Israel's Negev desert, and domesticated housecats like Abigail, among others. Domestication is the process of taming wild animals. No matter where the domesticated cats came from, results showed, their DNA looked more like the DNA of a subspecies of wildcats from the Near East than the DNA from any other subspecies. That zeroes in on the Near East as the place where wild cats first became pets. Archaeological evidence tells a similar story. Studies of ancient sites show that nomadic people in the Near East started to settle down even before they began planting crops and domesticating animals. Their settlements—especially their trash—attracted hungry animals. As people and cats got used to each other, the two species became friends. This "seems now to be the context in which the wild cat became the tabby cat," says Melinda Zeder of the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C. She studies animal domestication. The new study doesn't say much about the date of cat domestication, and scientists are still debating when it happened. One group of scientists says that people have been caring about cats for at least 9,500 years. Around that time, a cat skeleton was buried next to a human skeleton on the island of Cyprus, say researchers from the National Museum of Natural History in Paris. They've been studying the animal's bones. Future studies may finally pinpoint the time when "meow" became a household word.—Emily Sohn

The History of Meow
The History of Meow








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™