Agriculture
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Watering the Air
Amphibians
Newts
Toads
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
Sea Lilies on the Run
New Mammals
Sleepless at Sea
Behavior
The (kids') eyes have it
Hitting the redo button on evolution
The chemistry of sleeplessness
Birds
Crows
Eagles
Doves
Chemistry and Materials
Earth from the inside out
The science of disappearing
The metal detector in your mouth
Computers
Supersonic Splash
A Classroom of the Mind
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Dinosaurs and Fossils
A Really Big (but Extinct) Rodent
Dino-bite!
Did Dinosaurs Do Handstands?
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Unnatural Disasters
Rodent Rubbish as an Ice-Age Thermometer
Farms sprout in cities
Environment
Fishing for Fun Takes Toll
Flu river
Little Bits of Trouble
Finding the Past
Digging Up Stone Age Art
A Long Haul
Watching deep-space fireworks
Fish
Halibut
Bull Sharks
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Food and Nutrition
How Super Are Superfruits?
Chocolate Rules
Symbols from the Stone Age
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Pronouns
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
Play for Science
Math Naturals
Monkeys Count
Human Body
Spit Power
Fighting Off Micro-Invader Epidemics
Sun Screen
Invertebrates
Squid
Flies
Arachnids
Mammals
Bats
Chihuahuas
Bears
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Electric Backpack
Dreams of Floating in Space
Plants
A Giant Flower's New Family
The algae invasion
Springing forward
Reptiles
Geckos
Pythons
Crocodiles
Space and Astronomy
Supernovas Shed Light on Dark Energy
Super Star Cluster in the Neighborhood
A Darker, Warmer Red Planet
Technology and Engineering
Weaving with Light
A Light Delay
Supersuits for Superheroes
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Troubles with Hubble
Robots on the Road, Again
Weather
Science loses out when ice caps melt
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Arctic Melt
Add your Article

The Essence of Celery

Celery has a certain something, as most chefs will tell you. Even though the vegetable's flavor is mild, it's an ingredient in a variety of soup recipes. To figure out how celery has gained its popularity among cooks, Japanese scientists studied chemical compounds that give the vegetable its smell. In previous experiments, the researchers had zeroed in on a collection of these compounds, called phthalides (pronounced thaă' līdz). For their most recent experiment, Kikue Kubota and colleagues added celery to a pot of water and then heated it. The team collected vapors that boiled off, leaving behind the solid parts of the vegetable. They added the solids to one pot of chicken broth. They cooled the vaporous compounds, which were now a liquid, and put them in a second pot. In both pots, the scientists added such a small amount of each substance that no one could possibly smell the celery in them. The researchers also cooked up samples of broth to which they added each of four celery phthalides—again in amounts that were too small to smell. They left one pot of broth alone, with no elements of celery added. Ten expert taste testers, all women, sampled and rated each type of broth, but weren't told which soup was which. Then, they tasted many of the soups again while wearing nose clips. Smell affects taste, and the nose clips were used to separate what the tongue was sensing from what the nose was picking up. Results showed that chicken broth with celery compounds from the cooled vapors tasted best, even though the evaporated parts had no flavor themselves. Three of the four phthalides also improved the broth's flavor, but only when the tasters' nostrils were left open. The scientists concluded that celery's flavoring power comes from compounds that we can smell but can't taste. So, even when you don't think you can smell the vegetable in your soup, your nose is probably sensing some essences of celery that enhance your dining experience.—Emily Sohn

The Essence of Celery
The Essence of Celery








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™