Agriculture
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Salamanders
Tree Frogs
Animals
Color-Changing Bugs
Lives of a Mole Rat
Little Beetle, Big Horns
Behavior
Eating Troubles
Diving, Rolling, and Floating, Alligator Style
Baby Number Whizzes
Birds
Ospreys
Parakeets
Lovebirds
Chemistry and Materials
A Diamond Polish for Ancient Tools
The Taste of Bubbles
Atomic Drive
Computers
Electronic Paper Turns a Page
The Book of Life
Earth from the inside out
Dinosaurs and Fossils
A Rainforest Trapped in Amber
Early Birds Ready to Rumble
The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Ancient Heights
Less Mixing Can Affect Lake's Ecosystem
Pollution at the ends of the Earth
Environment
A Vulture's Hidden Enemy
Animal CSI or from Science Lab to Crime Lab
Plastic Meals for Seals
Finding the Past
Decoding a Beverage Jar
Meet your mysterious relative
Ancient Cave Behavior
Fish
Hagfish
Sturgeons
Great White Shark
Food and Nutrition
Strong Bones for Life
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
A Taste for Cheese
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Problems with Prepositions
Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
Play for Science
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Human Body
Foul Play?
The tell-tale bacteria
Smiles Turn Away Colds
Invertebrates
Camel Spiders
Moths
Tapeworms
Mammals
Chimpanzees
Canines
Badgers
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Road Bumps
The Particle Zoo
Plants
Seeds of the Future
Nature's Alphabet
Flower family knows its roots
Reptiles
Crocodilians
Tortoises
Cobras
Space and Astronomy
Ready, Set, Supernova
An Earthlike Planet
A Moon's Icy Spray
Technology and Engineering
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
Searching for Alien Life
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
What is a Verb?
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Reach for the Sky
Middle school science adventures
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Weather
Warmest Year on Record
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Add your Article

The Earth-bound asteroid scientists saw coming

On October 7, 2008, an asteroid the size of a car blazed through the atmosphere and crashed into the Nubian Desert in the African nation of Sudan. Eyewitnesses who were looking up at the sky at the time reported seeing a fireball over the desert when the asteroid, named 2008 TC3, exploded into pieces. Some people weren’t surprised by all the fireworks though. For the first time in history, scientists were able to watch the asteroid as it flew through space, then entered Earth’s atmosphere and crashed into the desert. 2008 TC3 is the first asteroid to be observed both in space and on Earth. Before this asteroid’s arrival, scientists have had to rely on data from one place or the other. Asteroids the size of 2008 TC3 are not uncommon, and fragments from one usually strike Earth every year. Because they are so small, Earth-bound asteroids usually remain unseen until they enter our atmosphere. Larger asteroids are easier to see, but are more rare. “It’s like when bugs splatter on the windshield. You don’t see the bug until it’s too late,” says Mark Boslough, a physicist at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, N.M., who has studied the asteroid’s collision. “You’d see a baseball coming towards the windshield much sooner.” In the case of 2008 TC3, the astronomers who first observed it got lucky. They didn’t know they were going to see it. “It just so happened that the asteroid was coming from the direction that the telescope was pointed in,” says astronomer Peter Jenniskens of the SETI Institute in Mountain View, Calif. The astronomers first saw the asteroid on October 6, through a telescope on a mountain near Tucson, Ariz. As they watched 2008 TC3 move across the sky, the scientists studied its mineral composition by observing how the asteroid reflected sunlight. They also used tracking equipment to correctly predict when the asteroid would impact Earth. Shortly after the collision, Jenniskens and a team of astronomers and students from Sudan headed out into the desert to look for meteorites, pieces of the asteroid that survived the fiery trip through the atmosphere and landed on Earth. The team brought back about 47 meteorites from 2008 TC3. Once they were able to study the fragments in the laboratory, the scientists quickly realized that the 2008 TC3 meteorites were unlike anything they had seen or studied before. More research on the pieces gave the scientists new information about the characteristics of different kinds of meteorites. In addition to helping scientists understand more about asteroids, 2008 TC3 may prove to be helpful to humankind in the future. If a larger and more dangerous asteroid ever comes crashing toward Earth, scientists might see it coming. Power words: (Adapted from the Yahoo! Kids Dictionary) Meteorite: A stony or metallic mass of matter that has fallen to Earth's surface from outer space. Asteroid: Any of numerous small celestial bodies that revolve around the sun. Telescope: Any of various devices used to detect and observe distant objects. Atmosphere: The gaseous mass surrounding a celestial body and retained by the celestial body's gravitational field.

The Earth-bound asteroid scientists saw coming
The Earth-bound asteroid scientists saw coming








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™