Agriculture
Making the most of a meal
Watering the Air
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Salamanders
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
Lucky Survival for Black Cats
A Butterfly's New Green Glow
Living in the Desert
Behavior
The Colorful World of Synesthesia
Pondering the puzzling platypus
Slumber by the numbers
Birds
Cranes
Flightless Birds
Roadrunners
Chemistry and Materials
The memory of a material
Sugary Survival Skill
A Butterfly's Electric Glow
Computers
Programming with Alice
Galaxies on the go
Hubble trouble doubled
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Digging for Ancient DNA
From Mammoth to Modern Elephant
Dino Babies
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Coral Islands Survive a Tsunami
Plastic-munching microbes
Environment
Watching for Wildfires in Yellowstone
A Vulture's Hidden Enemy
Blooming Jellies
Finding the Past
Unearthing Ancient Astronomy
Writing on eggshells
A Plankhouse Past
Fish
Mahi-Mahi
Great White Shark
Bull Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Problems with Prepositions
Whoever vs. Whomever
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Scholarship
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Losing with Heads or Tails
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Human Body
Opening a Channel for Tasting Salt
Football Scrapes and Nasty Infections
Spit Power
Invertebrates
Leeches
Shrimps
Mussels
Mammals
Antelope
Wolves
Scottish Folds
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Children and Media
Physics
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Invisibility Ring
Dreams of Floating in Space
Plants
A Giant Flower's New Family
Fungus Hunt
Bright Blooms That Glow
Reptiles
Sea Turtles
Garter Snakes
Caimans
Space and Astronomy
Planning for Mars
Unveiling Titan
A Dead Star's Dusty Ring
Technology and Engineering
Sugar Power for Cell Phones
A Clean Getaway
Riding Sunlight
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Problems with Prepositions
Pronouns
Transportation
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Troubles with Hubble
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Weather
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Recipe for a Hurricane
A Change in Climate
Add your Article

The Down Side of Keeping Clean

Wash your hands. Brush your teeth. Scrub the toilet. Do the dishes. Being clean is supposed to keep us healthy by destroying bacteria that make us sick. But our meticulous attention to cleanliness might have a down side. New research suggests that the chemicals we use to clean and disinfect could be damaging the environment by killing off algae at the base of the food chain. Over the past decade, the war against bacteria has been escalating. From dish soap to toothpaste, cleaning products have become increasingly deadly to the tiny troublemakers. After getting dumped down the drain, those household chemicals usually go straight through the sewer system and into lakes and streams, ignored by wastewater treatment plants. Curious about the environmental effects of all that chemical runoff, environmental scientist Brittan A. Wilson of the University of Kansas in Lawrence and colleagues collected algae from a Kansas stream. In the lab, the scientists doused the algae with three common household chemicals in concentrations comparable to levels often found in American streams. The number of species of algae and overall growth of algae dropped in samples treated with the chemicals, but not in untreated samples, the researchers report. Those results may be alarming, but they shouldn't be a complete surprise. "It's stupid to think that chemicals that keep toothpaste safe from bacteria won't have an effect at the other end of the sewer pipe," says ecologist Stanley I. Dodson of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. What is surprising is that even low concentrations of the chemicals can have a big effect.—E. Sohn

The Down Side of Keeping Clean
The Down Side of Keeping Clean








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™