Agriculture
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Getting the dirt on carbon
Seeds of the Future
Amphibians
Toads
Salamanders
Tree Frogs
Animals
Living in the Desert
Polar Bears in Trouble
Gliders in the Family
Behavior
A brain-boosting video game
Babies Prove Sound Learners
Puberty gone wild
Birds
Finches
Nightingales
Blue Jays
Chemistry and Materials
Gooey Secrets of Mussel Power
Makeup Science
Boosting Fuel Cells
Computers
Small but WISE
Lighting goes digital
Computers with Attitude
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Hall of Dinos
An Ancient Feathered Biplane
A Really Big (but Extinct) Rodent
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Arctic Algae Show Climate Change
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Deep Drilling at Sea
Environment
Acid Snails
The Birds are Falling
Plastic Meals for Seals
Finding the Past
Oldest Writing in the New World
Unearthing Ancient Astronomy
Meet your mysterious relative
Fish
Perches
Hammerhead Sharks
Catfish
Food and Nutrition
The Essence of Celery
Food for Life
A Taste for Cheese
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Subject and Verb Agreement
Pronouns
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
It's a Math World for Animals
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Human Body
Heart Revival
Taking the sting out of scorpion venom
Music in the Brain
Invertebrates
Bedbugs
Flies
Octopuses
Mammals
Wildcats
Skunks
Pekingese
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Children and Media
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
Powering Ball Lightning
The Particle Zoo
Road Bumps
Plants
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Farms sprout in cities
Getting the dirt on carbon
Reptiles
Crocodiles
Tortoises
Caimans
Space and Astronomy
A Dead Star's Dusty Ring
A Very Distant Planet Says "Cheese"
An Icy Blob of Fluff
Technology and Engineering
Weaving with Light
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Dancing with Robots
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Preposition?
What is a Noun
Transportation
Reach for the Sky
Troubles with Hubble
How to Fly Like a Bat
Weather
Watering the Air
Science loses out when ice caps melt
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Add your Article

The chemistry of sleeplessness

When the school year starts, it can be tough to switch from lazy summer mornings to the blaring buzz of an alarm clock. After a few early mornings, extreme fatigue might make you feel like you’re going to fall over. The amazing thing is that you probably manage to stay awake all day long and into the night. But how? A chemical in the brain called dopamine might be part of the answer. According to new research, dopamine is what keeps people who don’t get enough sleep from conking out. The chemical also has a complicated influence on your ability to think and learn when you don’t get enough zzzzz’s. To study sleep loss and its effect on the brain, scientists from the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md., and the Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, N.Y., rounded up 15 healthy volunteers. The scientists tested each person’s memory and ability to pay attention twice: once after a good night’s sleep and once after being kept up all night long. During the tests, the scientists measured levels of dopamine in the brains of the volunteers. The results showed that when the volunteers stayed up all night, dopamine levels increased in two parts of the brain: the striatum and the thalamus. The striatum responds to motivations and rewards. The thalamus controls how alert you feel. Higher levels of dopamine, the study suggested, kept the volunteers awake even though they felt tired. In addition, the new research suggests that dopamine levels might play a part in controlling how well people can function without sleep. Some people are miraculously able to think clearly and react quickly, even when they haven’t had much sleep. Other people have a really hard time paying attention when exhausted, and their reaction times slow way down. The researchers found that higher levels of dopamine don’t fend off the trouble people have thinking and learning while sleep-deprived. But the new research does suggest that dopamine levels may play a part in controlling how well people can function without sleep. Dopamine is a complicated chemical, and sleep-deprivation is a complicated state of mind. Even when people think they feel OK, exhaustion makes it difficult for them to learn or think as well as they can when they’re rested. “A little bit of dopamine is good,” says Paul Shaw, a sleep researcher at Washington University in St. Louis. “More is bad. Less is bad too. You’ve got to be in the sweet spot,” to think, respond and learn to your full potential.

The chemistry of sleeplessness
The chemistry of sleeplessness








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™