Agriculture
Watering the Air
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Seeds of the Future
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Toads
Frogs and Toads
Animals
Sleepless at Sea
Cacophony Acoustics
How to Silence a Cricket
Behavior
The (kids') eyes have it
A Recipe for Happiness
Why Cats Nap and Whales Snooze
Birds
Swans
Robins
Ducks
Chemistry and Materials
When frog gender flips
A Butterfly's Electric Glow
The metal detector in your mouth
Computers
Fingerprint Evidence
The science of disappearing
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Dinosaurs and Fossils
The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs
From Mammoth to Modern Elephant
A Big, Weird Dino
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
The Rise of Yellowstone
Life under Ice
Drilling Deep for Fuel
Environment
Shrimpy Invaders
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Animal CSI or from Science Lab to Crime Lab
Finding the Past
Writing on eggshells
Unearthing Ancient Astronomy
A Long Haul
Fish
Perches
Tilapia
Sting Ray
Food and Nutrition
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
The mercury in that tuna
Recipe for Health
GSAT English Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Pronouns
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Exam Preparation
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Detecting True Art
Deep-space dancers
Human Body
Spit Power
Running with Sneaker Science
Workouts: Does Stretching Help?
Invertebrates
Worms
Mosquitos
Insects
Mammals
Gazelle
Hoofed Mammals
Labradors
Parents
Children and Media
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Einstein's Skateboard
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
One ring around them all
Plants
Fungus Hunt
Sweet, Sticky Science
Making the most of a meal
Reptiles
Reptiles
Cobras
Anacondas
Space and Astronomy
A Smashing Display
A Planet's Slim-Fast Plan
A Moon's Icy Spray
Technology and Engineering
Reach for the Sky
Beyond Bar Codes
A Clean Getaway
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
Adjectives and Adverbs
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Ready, unplug, drive
Troubles with Hubble
Reach for the Sky
Weather
Recipe for a Hurricane
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Catching Some Rays
Add your Article

Tapeworms and Drug Delivery

It's not easy living inside an intestine. But some creatures are happiest in the warm and juicy confines of other animals' digestive systems. A tapeworm called Hymenolepis diminuta, for instance, can live for years in a rat's intestine, growing up to a foot long. One of the biggest challenges to gut living is all the churning that happens in there. Between meals, the muscles in a mammal's intestine contract rhythmically to flush out waste and bacteria. Somehow, tapeworms manage to slow down the contractions enough to stay inside. They even swim up and down the intestinal tract as food moves through. Now, scientists at the University of Wisconsin think they've discovered one of the tapeworm's secret weapons: a chemical called cyclic guanosine monophosphate, or cGMP. Research by John Oaks and colleagues suggests that cGMP helps slow intestinal contractions. The new work may help scientists develop more effective medicines. Because molecules move more slowly through rat intestines that are infected with tapeworms, the scientists think a dash of cGMP could slow down the movement of pills after they've been swallowed. That would give the body more time to absorb medicine in the pills, letting less go to waste. So, even though the life of a tapeworm might not sound pleasant, studying the icky parasites more might do us some good.E. Sohn

Tapeworms and Drug Delivery
Tapeworms and Drug Delivery








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™