Agriculture
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Getting the dirt on carbon
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Tree Frogs
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
Revenge of the Cowbirds
A Tongue and a Half
New Elephant-Shrew
Behavior
Ear pain, weight gain
The Smell of Trust
Body clocks
Birds
Carnivorous Birds
Condors
Kiwis
Chemistry and Materials
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Mother-of-Pearl on Ice
Spinning Clay into Cotton
Computers
The Shape of the Internet
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
Batteries built by Viruses
Dinosaurs and Fossils
A Rainforest Trapped in Amber
Hunting by Sucking, Long Ago
Dino Babies
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
A Global Warming Flap
Getting the dirt on carbon
Rodent Rubbish as an Ice-Age Thermometer
Environment
A 'Book' on Every Living Thing
Catching Some Rays
Pollution Detective
Finding the Past
Fakes in the museum
Traces of Ancient Campfires
Untangling Human Origins
Fish
Barracudas
Electric Catfish
Electric Eel
Food and Nutrition
Building a Food Pyramid
The Essence of Celery
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Who vs. That vs. Which
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Detecting True Art
Losing with Heads or Tails
Human Body
Sea Kids See Clearly Underwater
Heart Revival
Kids now getting 'adult' disease
Invertebrates
Butterflies
Krill
Fleas
Mammals
Boxers
Walrus
Aquatic Animals
Parents
Children and Media
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
How children learn
Physics
Speedy stars
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Dreams of Floating in Space
Plants
Flower family knows its roots
Springing forward
Bright Blooms That Glow
Reptiles
Pythons
Black Mamba
Tortoises
Space and Astronomy
A Whole Lot of Nothing
Wrong-way planets do gymnastics
No Fat Stars
Technology and Engineering
Algae Motors
Machine Copy
Shape Shifting
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Preposition?
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Ready, unplug, drive
How to Fly Like a Bat
Where rivers run uphill
Weather
Warmest Year on Record
Watering the Air
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Add your Article

Switchable Lenses Improve Vision

Some people have the impression that wearing eyeglasses can make you look smarter. Someday, your glasses themselves might actually be smarter. Scientists are developing "smart" lenses that sense where your eyes are looking and automatically focus to help you see more clearly. The main market for the glasses is adults older than 45—perhaps your parents or grandparents. At this point in life, most people start to get worse at seeing things that are close to them, such as books and computer screens. When the decline begins, people usually start wearing reading glasses. Or, they get bifocals, which have divided lenses—a top part for seeing far and a bottom part for seeing near. Some kids with vision problems have to wear such glasses, too. University researchers are working with a company called PixelOptics, in Roanoke, Va., to replace bifocals with electric lenses that can switch quickly from one type of focus to another. "You don't have just the bottom half of your eyeglasses" for close vision, says electrical engineer David L. Mathine of the University of Arizona in Tucson. He's one of the inventors. "You get the whole view," he says. Each lens is made from two layers, and each layer is made up of two sheets of glass, with a thin layer of fluid sandwiched between the sheets. The fluid contains a transparent type of material called a liquid crystal, which is made of molecules that are shaped like rods. To change a lens' focus, scientists apply electricity to the inner surface of one of the glass sheets in each layer. In response to the electricity, the crystal rods rotate. Their direction determines how quickly light passes through the liquid-crystal layer. The process allows the material to focus light so that a crisp image forms inside the viewer's eyes. Scientists had made similar, electrically controlled lenses before, but these earlier lenses couldn't focus well enough or change focus quickly enough to be useful in eyeglasses, the inventors say. PixelOptics has announced that it also plans to make a version of the glasses that will help people achieve extrasharp vision—even better than normal 20/20 eyesight.—E. Sohn

Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™