Agriculture
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Fast-flying fungal spores
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Bullfrogs
Newts
Animals
Koalas, Up Close and Personal
Tool Use Comes Naturally to Crows
Sleep Affects a Bird's Singing
Behavior
The Disappearing Newspaper
Storing Memories before Bedtime
Honeybees do the wave
Birds
Waterfowl
Parakeets
Carnivorous Birds
Chemistry and Materials
The Buzz about Caffeine
Cooking Up Superhard Diamonds
Sticking Around with Gecko Tape
Computers
Batteries built by Viruses
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
Galaxies on the go
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino-bite!
A Rainforest Trapped in Amber
Digging Dinos
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Slip Slidin' Away—Under the Sea
Rocking the House
Surf Watch
Environment
Nanosponges Soak Up Pollutants
Giant snakes invading North America
Sea Otters, Kelp, and Killer Whales
Finding the Past
Meet your mysterious relative
Childhood's Long History
Your inner Neandertal
Fish
Saltwater Fish
Bass
Flounder
Food and Nutrition
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
Food for Life
How Super Are Superfruits?
GSAT English Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Pronouns
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
Detecting True Art
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Human Body
Cell Phones and Possible Health Hazards
Remembering Facts and Feelings
Opening a Channel for Tasting Salt
Invertebrates
Starfish
Tarantula
Horseshoe Crabs
Mammals
Cornish Rex
Yaks
Ferrets
Parents
Children and Media
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Invisibility Ring
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Road Bumps
Plants
Sweet, Sticky Science
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Reptiles
Turtles
Reptiles
Lizards
Space and Astronomy
A Galaxy Far, Far, Far Away
Catching a Comet's Tail
Gravity Tractor as Asteroid Mover
Technology and Engineering
A Light Delay
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
Musclebots Take Some Steps
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
Pronouns
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Revving Up Green Machines
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Flying the Hyper Skies
Weather
Where rivers run uphill
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
A Dire Shortage of Water
Add your Article

Switchable Lenses Improve Vision

Some people have the impression that wearing eyeglasses can make you look smarter. Someday, your glasses themselves might actually be smarter. Scientists are developing "smart" lenses that sense where your eyes are looking and automatically focus to help you see more clearly. The main market for the glasses is adults older than 45—perhaps your parents or grandparents. At this point in life, most people start to get worse at seeing things that are close to them, such as books and computer screens. When the decline begins, people usually start wearing reading glasses. Or, they get bifocals, which have divided lenses—a top part for seeing far and a bottom part for seeing near. Some kids with vision problems have to wear such glasses, too. University researchers are working with a company called PixelOptics, in Roanoke, Va., to replace bifocals with electric lenses that can switch quickly from one type of focus to another. "You don't have just the bottom half of your eyeglasses" for close vision, says electrical engineer David L. Mathine of the University of Arizona in Tucson. He's one of the inventors. "You get the whole view," he says. Each lens is made from two layers, and each layer is made up of two sheets of glass, with a thin layer of fluid sandwiched between the sheets. The fluid contains a transparent type of material called a liquid crystal, which is made of molecules that are shaped like rods. To change a lens' focus, scientists apply electricity to the inner surface of one of the glass sheets in each layer. In response to the electricity, the crystal rods rotate. Their direction determines how quickly light passes through the liquid-crystal layer. The process allows the material to focus light so that a crisp image forms inside the viewer's eyes. Scientists had made similar, electrically controlled lenses before, but these earlier lenses couldn't focus well enough or change focus quickly enough to be useful in eyeglasses, the inventors say. PixelOptics has announced that it also plans to make a version of the glasses that will help people achieve extrasharp vision—even better than normal 20/20 eyesight.—E. Sohn

Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™