Agriculture
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Frogs and Toads
Salamanders
Animals
Walks on the Wild Side
Color-Changing Bugs
Armadillo
Behavior
Flower family knows its roots
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Pain Expectations
Birds
Crows
Songbirds
Lovebirds
Chemistry and Materials
Cold, colder and coldest ice
Heaviest named element is official
Supersonic Splash
Computers
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Galaxies far, far, far away
Batteries built by Viruses
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino Babies
Ferocious Growth Spurts
Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Detecting an Eerie Sea Glow
Warmest Year on Record
A Great Quake Coming?
Environment
Forests as a Tsunami Shield
Ready, unplug, drive
Seabirds Deliver Arctic Pollutants
Finding the Past
Watching deep-space fireworks
Salt and Early Civilization
A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?
Fish
Sharks
Sturgeons
Trout
Food and Nutrition
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
Chew for Health
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Subject and Verb Agreement
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Mastering The GSAT Exam
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
Math of the World
Deep-space dancers
Prime Time for Cicadas
Human Body
Flu Patrol
Hey batter, wake up!
What the appendix is good for
Invertebrates
Roundworms
Giant Squid
Mosquitos
Mammals
African Elephants
Yaks
Humans
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
How children learn
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Electric Backpack
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Invisibility Ring
Plants
City Trees Beat Country Trees
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
The algae invasion
Reptiles
Snapping Turtles
Alligators
Asp
Space and Astronomy
Asteroid Moons
Ringing Saturn
A Great Ball of Fire
Technology and Engineering
Bionic Bacteria
Young Scientists Take Flight
Reach for the Sky
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Verb?
What is a Noun
Transportation
Revving Up Green Machines
Troubles with Hubble
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Weather
Watering the Air
A Change in Climate
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Add your Article

Supersight for a Dino King

The movie Jurassic Park has a scary scene in which a Tyrannosaurus rex growls right into the faces of two characters. One person tells the other not to worry because T. rex can't see things that don't move. Bad advice. A scientist now suggests that T. rex had some of the best vision in animal history. Kent A. Stevens of the University of Oregon used models of the faces of several dinosaurs, including T. rex, to try to figure out how well they could see. He was especially interested in T. rex's binocular vision. Binocular vision allows animals to see three-dimensional objects more clearly, even when the objects are motionless or camouflaged. It turns out that T. rex had pretty amazing vision—better than people and even hawks have. Stevens also found that parts of T. rex's face changed over time to help it see better. As the animal evolved over millennia, its eyeballs grew larger and its snout grew skinnier so that its view wasn't blocked. "With the size of its eyeballs, it couldn't help but have excellent vision," Stevens says. In fact, its vision was so sharp that it could probably distinguish objects that were as far away as 6 kilometers. People can do no better than 1.6 kilometers. T. rex was a meat-eating dinosaur, but scientists disagree on whether T. rex hunted for its food or simply ate leftovers from other dinosaurs. The dinosaur's amazing vision has some scientists thinking that T. rex was a hunter. After all, if it ate only leftovers, why would it need to spot other animals so far away? Other scientists say that T. rex could have used its great vision for other purposes, such as avoiding trees. Stevens says that he was inspired to study T. rex eyes because he didn't believe that the T. rex scene in Jurassic Park was possible. "If you're sweating in fear 1 inch from the nostrils of the T. rex, it would figure out you were there anyway," he says.—E. Jaffe

Supersight for a Dino King
Supersight for a Dino King








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™