Agriculture
Seeds of the Future
Springing forward
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Tree Frogs
Toads
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Ant Invasions Change the Rules
A Sense of Danger
Walktopus
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Pipefish power from mom
Calculating crime
A brain-boosting video game
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Meteorites may have sparked life on Earth
When frog gender flips
Small but WISE
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The solar system's biggest junkyard
New eyes to scan the skies
Graphene's superstrength
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Ancient Critter Caught Shedding Its Skin
South America's sticky tar pits
The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
Hints of Life in Ancient Lava
A Global Warming Flap
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When Fungi and Algae Marry
Snow Traps
Forests as a Tsunami Shield
Finding the Past
Meet your mysterious relative
Untangling Human Origins
Fakes in the museum
Fish
Nurse Sharks
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Lampreys
Food and Nutrition
Packing Fat
Yummy bugs
Symbols from the Stone Age
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Who vs. That vs. Which
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Play for Science
Math is a real brain bender
Human Body
A Long Haul
Hey batter, wake up!
Kids now getting 'adult' disease
Invertebrates
Centipedes
Sponges
Butterflies
Mammals
Marmots
Hares
Raccoons
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
How children learn
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
One ring around them all
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
The Particle Zoo
Plants
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Springing forward
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Reptiles
Box Turtles
Black Mamba
Geckos
Space and Astronomy
A Planet from the Early Universe
Chaos Among the Planets
Mercury's magnetic twisters
Technology and Engineering
Shape Shifting
Reach for the Sky
Weaving with Light
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Noun
Pronouns
Transportation
Troubles with Hubble
Robots on a Rocky Road
Middle school science adventures
Weather
A Dire Shortage of Water
Either Martians or Mars has gas
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
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Supergoo to the rescue

Inside a disposable diaper are tiny crystals of a material called sodium polyacrylate that can absorb hundreds of times their weight in water. Just a small amount of the stuff — sometimes called “Super Slurper” — can sop up a lot of liquid, no matter where it comes from. When the crystals absorb water, they form a thick and sticky goo (which is why a used diaper gets so heavy). Now, scientists at the Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois have found a new use for this goo: cleaning up after a terrorist attack. A dirty bomb is a weapon that uses explosives to create a cloud of radioactive materials. Radioactive materials send off energy in the form of radiation, including a form that’s used to make X-rays of your teeth. But too much radiation can make you sick, and even die. So, if a dirty bomb were ever to go off (which hasn’t happened in the U.S.), particles of radioactive material would be released into the air. Terrorists have talked about making such an explosion to cause confusion and panic. But blown by the wind, the dangerous particles released by such a detonation can stick to building materials like marble or brick. This is where the supergoo comes in. If a dirty bomb were to go off, scientists could spray the sticky gel onto buildings. Afterward, when teams clean up the gel, the radioactive particles would peel off with it. In the laboratory, Argonne engineer Michael Kaminski and his team have shown that one treatment with the thick gel can remove 80 percent of radioactive leftovers on marble. After two treatments, 90 percent of the leftovers were removed. Many of our national monuments are made of marble, so Kaminski’s supergoo would aid cleanup efforts without damaging the monuments themselves. The goo isn’t only successful; it’s also nontoxic. “In fact,” he says, “you could literally eat some of the formulations that we’ve made.” But the goo doesn’t work everywhere. It works so well on marble partly because the polished marble used on most monuments is extremely smooth — there aren’t many holes to shelter radioactive dust. Brick, on the other hand, is rough, so the gel doesn’t work as well. “Removal rates are poor,” Kaminski says. Kaminski started working on the super-cleaning supergoo after the Department of Homeland Security asked scientists to come up with ways to clean up radioactive materials. It’s scary to think about a dirty bomb going off, but it’s more disturbing to think about a dirty bomb going off and not knowing how to respond.

Supergoo to the rescue
Supergoo to the rescue








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