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New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
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A Jellyfish's Blurry View
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Not Slippery When Wet
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Taking a Spill for Science
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Flightless Birds
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Diamond Glow
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Meteorites may have sparked life on Earth
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Hubble trouble doubled
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Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
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Did Dinosaurs Do Handstands?
A Big, Weird Dino
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
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Shrinking Glaciers
Earth's Poles in Peril
Explorer of the Extreme Deep
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A Stormy History
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Plastic Meals for Seals
Finding the Past
An Ancient Childhood
Sahara Cemetery
A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?
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Skates
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Mahi-Mahi
Food and Nutrition
Packing Fat
A Taste for Cheese
Chocolate Rules
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Adjectives and Adverbs
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
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Setting a Prime Number Record
Detecting True Art
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
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Prime Time for Broken Bones
Germ Zapper
Spit Power
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Krill
Hermit Crabs
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Sloth Bears
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Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
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Road Bumps
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Speedy stars
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Fastest Plant on Earth
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Underwater Jungles
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Reptiles
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Anacondas
Space and Astronomy
World of Three Suns
Dark Galaxy
A Darker, Warmer Red Planet
Technology and Engineering
Weaving with Light
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
Bionic Bacteria
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Verb?
Pronouns
Transportation
Where rivers run uphill
Reach for the Sky
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Weather
Warmest Year on Record
Arctic Melt
Where rivers run uphill
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Supergoo to the rescue

Inside a disposable diaper are tiny crystals of a material called sodium polyacrylate that can absorb hundreds of times their weight in water. Just a small amount of the stuff — sometimes called “Super Slurper” — can sop up a lot of liquid, no matter where it comes from. When the crystals absorb water, they form a thick and sticky goo (which is why a used diaper gets so heavy). Now, scientists at the Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois have found a new use for this goo: cleaning up after a terrorist attack. A dirty bomb is a weapon that uses explosives to create a cloud of radioactive materials. Radioactive materials send off energy in the form of radiation, including a form that’s used to make X-rays of your teeth. But too much radiation can make you sick, and even die. So, if a dirty bomb were ever to go off (which hasn’t happened in the U.S.), particles of radioactive material would be released into the air. Terrorists have talked about making such an explosion to cause confusion and panic. But blown by the wind, the dangerous particles released by such a detonation can stick to building materials like marble or brick. This is where the supergoo comes in. If a dirty bomb were to go off, scientists could spray the sticky gel onto buildings. Afterward, when teams clean up the gel, the radioactive particles would peel off with it. In the laboratory, Argonne engineer Michael Kaminski and his team have shown that one treatment with the thick gel can remove 80 percent of radioactive leftovers on marble. After two treatments, 90 percent of the leftovers were removed. Many of our national monuments are made of marble, so Kaminski’s supergoo would aid cleanup efforts without damaging the monuments themselves. The goo isn’t only successful; it’s also nontoxic. “In fact,” he says, “you could literally eat some of the formulations that we’ve made.” But the goo doesn’t work everywhere. It works so well on marble partly because the polished marble used on most monuments is extremely smooth — there aren’t many holes to shelter radioactive dust. Brick, on the other hand, is rough, so the gel doesn’t work as well. “Removal rates are poor,” Kaminski says. Kaminski started working on the super-cleaning supergoo after the Department of Homeland Security asked scientists to come up with ways to clean up radioactive materials. It’s scary to think about a dirty bomb going off, but it’s more disturbing to think about a dirty bomb going off and not knowing how to respond.

Supergoo to the rescue
Supergoo to the rescue








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