Agriculture
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Watering the Air
Silk’s superpowers
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Frogs and Toads
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
Sea Giants and Island Pygmies
New Monkey Business
Little Beetle, Big Horns
Behavior
Listen and Learn
Video Game Violence
World’s largest lizard is venomous too
Birds
Waterfowl
Parrots
Crows
Chemistry and Materials
Cooking Up Superhard Diamonds
Scientist Profile: Wally Gilbert
Salt secrets
Computers
Hubble trouble doubled
Programming with Alice
Galaxies on the go
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dinosaurs Grow Up
Hunting by Sucking, Long Ago
Did Dinosaurs Do Handstands?
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Bugs with Gas
Meteorites may have sparked life on Earth
A Great Quake Coming?
Environment
Nanosponges Soak Up Pollutants
An Ocean View's Downside
Easy Ways to Conserve Water
Finding the Past
Fakes in the museum
A Long Trek to Asia
Oldest Writing in the New World
Fish
Seahorses
Great White Shark
Skates
Food and Nutrition
Packing Fat
The Color of Health
A Taste for Cheese
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Adjectives and Adverbs
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Exam Preparation
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
Detecting True Art
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Losing with Heads or Tails
Human Body
Football Scrapes and Nasty Infections
Remembering Facts and Feelings
A Sour Taste in Your Mouth
Invertebrates
Sponges
Shrimps
Camel Spiders
Mammals
Jaguars
Opposum
Golden Retrievers
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Black Hole Journey
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Plants
Fastest Plant on Earth
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
Reptiles
Cobras
Iguanas
Garter Snakes
Space and Astronomy
A Galaxy Far, Far, Far Away
Return to Space
Tossing Out a Black Hole Life Preserver
Technology and Engineering
Dancing with Robots
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Weaving with Light
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Noun
Transportation
Charged cars that would charge
Ready, unplug, drive
Troubles with Hubble
Weather
Recipe for a Hurricane
Arctic Melt
Catching Some Rays
Add your Article

Super Star Cluster in the Neighborhood

Imagine cramming hundreds of thousands of bright, young stars into a space no bigger than our solar system. Talk about a traffic jam! Astronomers have observed such "super" star clusters, but only in galaxies far, far away—until now. It turns out there's a massive, super-dense star cluster right in our own galaxy, the Milky Way. It was spotted by a team of European astronomers using several telescopes at the European Southern Observatory's La Silla site in Chile. Just 10,000 light-years from Earth (a mere jog across town in space terms), the cluster measures 6 light-years across. Its weight, the astronomers estimate, is at least as heavy as 100,000 suns. The cluster's name is Westerlund 1. The fact that the cluster exists isn't a total surprise. Since 1961, astronomers have known that some sort of grouping of young stars lies in the constellation Ara. Because the cluster hides behind a large cloud of gas and dust, though, they had no idea how packed with stars it is. Sensitive detectors on telescopes at La Silla helped the researchers identify more than 200 massive stars in Westerlund 1. Each of these stars, they found, weighs 30 to 40 times as much as the sun. Some of the stars are a million times brighter. A few are so big that they would reach all the way to Saturn if you could put them where our sun is. The telescopes in Chile were not sensitive enough to detect smaller stars in the cluster, but scientists are sure they must be there. There are probably at least a half-million more stars in Westerlund 1, they say. The astronomers estimate that the cluster is just 5 million years old. That's young in star years. The discovery could help illuminate what the universe was like in its early days. Back then, studies suggest, star formation tended to happen within clusters. Collisions among stars in the super cluster could also lead to the formation of a medium-sized black hole. Right here in our own backyard.—E. Sohn

Super Star Cluster in the Neighborhood
Super Star Cluster in the Neighborhood








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™