Agriculture
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Silk’s superpowers
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Amphibians
Newts
Frogs and Toads
Bullfrogs
Animals
New Mammals
Roach Love Songs
The Secret Lives of Grizzlies
Behavior
Monkeys in the Mirror
How Much Babies Know
A Global Warming Flap
Birds
Geese
Seagulls
Condors
Chemistry and Materials
A Spider's Silky Strength
Popping to Perfection
A Framework for Growing Bone
Computers
The Book of Life
Earth from the inside out
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Mammals in the Shadow of Dinosaurs
Winged Insects May Go Way Back
A Big, Weird Dino
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Explorer of the Extreme Deep
What is groundwater
Less Mixing Can Affect Lake's Ecosystem
Environment
Plastic Meals for Seals
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Fungus Hunt
Finding the Past
An Ancient Childhood
The Taming of the Cat
Early Maya Writing
Fish
Electric Eel
Salmon
Flashlight Fishes
Food and Nutrition
The Color of Health
Healing Honey
Chew for Health
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Who vs. Whom
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
Math of the World
Math Naturals
Losing with Heads or Tails
Human Body
Sleeping Soundly for a Longer Life
Fighting Off Micro-Invader Epidemics
Spitting Up Blobs to Get Around
Invertebrates
Black Widow spiders
Butterflies
Mosquitos
Mammals
Yaks
Dalmatians
Chinchillas
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Road Bumps
Plants
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Nature's Alphabet
Reptiles
Chameleons
Rattlesnakes
Garter Snakes
Space and Astronomy
Saturn's New Moons
A Whole Lot of Nothing
Roving the Red Planet
Technology and Engineering
Riding Sunlight
Weaving with Light
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Pronouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Flying the Hyper Skies
Charged cars that would charge
How to Fly Like a Bat
Weather
Recipe for a Hurricane
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
A Dire Shortage of Water
Add your Article

Sugar Power for Cell Phones

Drinking sugary soda gives you a burst of energy. Some day, sugar might power electronic equipment as well. That's because scientists have now found a way to turn sugar into electricity. If they can find a way to make the technology work on a large scale, you may some day share your sweet drinks with your handheld video game player or cell phone. The new strategy involves fuel cells, which are devices that use chemical reactions to produce electrical currents. Manufacturers already make fuel cells that depend on precious metals, such as platinum, to spark those chemical reactions. Precious metals, however, are expensive and hard to get. For the new study, researchers from St. Louis University used a type of protein called enzymes in place of the metals. In the cells of living things, including people, enzymes are what spark chemical reactions. To keep up the pace that our bodies demand, our cells constantly produce new enzymes as the old ones break down. Scientists had tried using enzymes in fuel cells before, but they had trouble keeping the electricity flowing. That's because, unlike the enzymes in our cells, the enzymes in fuel cells break down faster than they can be replaced. To get around this problem, the St. Louis researchers invented molecules that wrap around an enzyme and protect it. Inside this molecular pocket, an enzyme can last for months instead of days. In the new fuel cells, electricity-conducting materials are attached to wires. The scientists coat each conductor with a layer of wrapped enzymes. Then, they allow a sugary liquid to ooze inside the enzyme pockets. When the enzymes interact with the sugar molecules in the liquid, chemical reactions release a flow of electrons into the wire. This process produces both water and an electrical current that could power electronic devices. So far, the new fuel cells don't produce much power, but the fact that they work at all is exciting, says Paul Kenis, a chemical engineer at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. "Just getting it to work," Kenis says, "is a major accomplishment." Sugar-eating fuel cells could be an efficient way to make electricity. Sugar is easy to find. And the new fuel cells that run on it are biodegradable, so the technology wouldn't hurt the environment. The scientists are now trying to use different enzymes that will get more power from sugar molecules. They predict that popular products may be using the new technology in as little as 3 years.—E. Sohn

Sugar Power for Cell Phones
Sugar Power for Cell Phones








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™