Agriculture
Getting the dirt on carbon
Fast-flying fungal spores
Middle school science adventures
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Bullfrogs
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
Fishy Sounds
A Microbe Nanny for Young Wasps
Blotchy Face, Big-Time Wasp
Behavior
Contemplating thought
The nerve of one animal
Wired for Math
Birds
Seagulls
Swans
Flightless Birds
Chemistry and Materials
Batteries built by Viruses
Cooking Up Superhard Diamonds
Supersonic Splash
Computers
Supersonic Splash
The Earth-bound asteroid scientists saw coming
Games with a Purpose
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Big Fish in Ancient Waters
A Really Big (but Extinct) Rodent
Dino-Dining Dinosaurs
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Sky Dust Keeps Falling on Your Head
Farms sprout in cities
A Dire Shortage of Water
Environment
Nanosponges Soak Up Pollutants
Shrinking Fish
A Vulture's Hidden Enemy
Finding the Past
Early Maya Writing
If Only Bones Could Speak
Decoding a Beverage Jar
Fish
Dogfish
Piranha
Skates
Food and Nutrition
Packing Fat
Making good, brown fat
How Super Are Superfruits?
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Adjectives and Adverbs
Subject and Verb Agreement
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Scholarship
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Math is a real brain bender
Human Body
Taste Messenger
Gut Microbes and Weight
Smiles Turn Away Colds
Invertebrates
Cockroaches
Giant Squid
Leeches
Mammals
Kodiak Bear
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Gray Whale
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
How children learn
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Black Hole Journey
Invisibility Ring
Plants
Surprise Visitor
Bright Blooms That Glow
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
Reptiles
Geckos
Box Turtles
Tortoises
Space and Astronomy
Supernovas Shed Light on Dark Energy
A Puffy Planetary Puzzle
Holes in Martian moon mystery
Technology and Engineering
Young Scientists Take Flight
Supersuits for Superheroes
Reach for the Sky
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Noun
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Robots on the Road, Again
How to Fly Like a Bat
Flying the Hyper Skies
Weather
Warmest Year on Record
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Recipe for a Hurricane
Add your Article

Sugar Power for Cell Phones

Drinking sugary soda gives you a burst of energy. Some day, sugar might power electronic equipment as well. That's because scientists have now found a way to turn sugar into electricity. If they can find a way to make the technology work on a large scale, you may some day share your sweet drinks with your handheld video game player or cell phone. The new strategy involves fuel cells, which are devices that use chemical reactions to produce electrical currents. Manufacturers already make fuel cells that depend on precious metals, such as platinum, to spark those chemical reactions. Precious metals, however, are expensive and hard to get. For the new study, researchers from St. Louis University used a type of protein called enzymes in place of the metals. In the cells of living things, including people, enzymes are what spark chemical reactions. To keep up the pace that our bodies demand, our cells constantly produce new enzymes as the old ones break down. Scientists had tried using enzymes in fuel cells before, but they had trouble keeping the electricity flowing. That's because, unlike the enzymes in our cells, the enzymes in fuel cells break down faster than they can be replaced. To get around this problem, the St. Louis researchers invented molecules that wrap around an enzyme and protect it. Inside this molecular pocket, an enzyme can last for months instead of days. In the new fuel cells, electricity-conducting materials are attached to wires. The scientists coat each conductor with a layer of wrapped enzymes. Then, they allow a sugary liquid to ooze inside the enzyme pockets. When the enzymes interact with the sugar molecules in the liquid, chemical reactions release a flow of electrons into the wire. This process produces both water and an electrical current that could power electronic devices. So far, the new fuel cells don't produce much power, but the fact that they work at all is exciting, says Paul Kenis, a chemical engineer at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. "Just getting it to work," Kenis says, "is a major accomplishment." Sugar-eating fuel cells could be an efficient way to make electricity. Sugar is easy to find. And the new fuel cells that run on it are biodegradable, so the technology wouldn't hurt the environment. The scientists are now trying to use different enzymes that will get more power from sugar molecules. They predict that popular products may be using the new technology in as little as 3 years.E. Sohn

Sugar Power for Cell Phones
Sugar Power for Cell Phones








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™