Agriculture
Watering the Air
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Frogs and Toads
Newts
Animals
Fishy Sounds
Bee Disease
Odor-Chasing Penguins
Behavior
Training Your Brain to Feel Less Pain
Reading Body Language
Taking a Spill for Science
Birds
A Meal Plan for Birds
Emus
Nightingales
Chemistry and Materials
Hair Detectives
Music of the Future
Batteries built by Viruses
Computers
Play for Science
Troubles with Hubble
Galaxies far, far, far away
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Some Dinos Dined on Grass
Dinosaurs Grow Up
A Rainforest Trapped in Amber
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Petrified Lightning
Pollution at the ends of the Earth
Less Mixing Can Affect Lake's Ecosystem
Environment
Indoor ozone stopper
Ready, unplug, drive
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
Finding the Past
Big Woman of the Distant Past
Fakes in the museum
A Long Trek to Asia
Fish
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Sting Ray
Barracudas
Food and Nutrition
Sponges' secret weapon
Chocolate Rules
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
GSAT English Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Pronouns
Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
Deep-space dancers
Losing with Heads or Tails
Prime Time for Cicadas
Human Body
Smiles Turn Away Colds
Running with Sneaker Science
Heavy Sleep
Invertebrates
Scorpions
Giant Clam
Camel Spiders
Mammals
Coyotes
Caribou
Golden Retrievers
Parents
Children and Media
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Electric Backpack
Road Bumps
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Plants
Farms sprout in cities
Surprise Visitor
Fast-flying fungal spores
Reptiles
Gila Monsters
Garter Snakes
Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Burst Busters
Baby Star
Dark Galaxy
Technology and Engineering
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
Smart Windows
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
Adjectives and Adverbs
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Flying the Hyper Skies
Middle school science adventures
Robots on the Road, Again
Weather
Warmest Year on Record
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Add your Article

Storing Memories before Bedtime

A good night's sleep may help your brain permanently file away lessons learned during the day. But, according to a new study, the brain begins processing and storing those memories long before it's time for bed—and continues to do so even while you're thinking about and doing other things. Recent studies have shown that the parts of the brain that we use to learn a task become active again during sleep. This activity, scientists suggest, could be the brain transferring memories from short-term to long-term storage (see "Memories Are Made with Sleep"). But the brain doesn't necessarily wait until the lights are out to begin processing those memories. To find out how the brain handles memories during waking hours, scientists gave 15 volunteers two tasks, each requiring different parts of the brain to learn. In one task, the subjects learned how to navigate a virtual town and then searched the town for an object. In the second task, they learned to predict where a sequence of dots would appear on a screen. Using a special machine, the researchers scanned the volunteers' brains right before and right after the tasks. They compared the two images to see whether the regions of the brain involved in learning the task were still active even after the task was completed. After a break, the scientists took a third image of each participant's brain. They wanted to determine whether these regions in the brain continued to be active after more time had passed. They discovered that, for at least an hour after learning a task, the brain stays active. It appears to continue processing the new information. Furthermore, the images showed that distracting the subjects doesn't affect their ability to store memories. The processing continues even when they're thinking about or doing other things. Some scientists say this could mean that sleep isn't essential for storing memories. Others disagree. Until that's settled, it's probably still better to be on the safe side, getting plenty of sleep.—C. Gramling

Storing Memories before Bedtime
Storing Memories before Bedtime








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™