Agriculture
Middle school science adventures
Watering the Air
Seeds of the Future
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Poison Dart Frogs
Bullfrogs
Animals
Big Squid
Staying Away from Sick Lobsters
Copybees
Behavior
Slumber by the numbers
Mind-reading Machine
Sugar-pill medicine
Birds
Owls
Hawks
Geese
Chemistry and Materials
Supersonic Splash
Undercover Detectives
The memory of a material
Computers
A Classroom of the Mind
Galaxies on the go
Games with a Purpose
Dinosaurs and Fossils
A Dino King's Ancestor
Hall of Dinos
Message in a dinosaur's teeth
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
A Global Warming Flap
Sky Dust Keeps Falling on Your Head
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Environment
Fishing for Fun Takes Toll
The Oily Gulf
Blooming Jellies
Finding the Past
A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?
Stonehenge Settlement
Words of the Distant Past
Fish
Perches
Megamouth Sharks
Carp
Food and Nutrition
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
How Super Are Superfruits?
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Capitalization Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Mastering The GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
Detecting True Art
Play for Science
Math is a real brain bender
Human Body
Prime Time for Broken Bones
Flu Patrol
Dreaming makes perfect
Invertebrates
Mussels
Lobsters
Caterpillars
Mammals
Minks
Sea Lions
Pugs
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Powering Ball Lightning
Dreams of Floating in Space
Plants
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Springing forward
Bright Blooms That Glow
Reptiles
Asp
Gila Monsters
Lizards
Space and Astronomy
Cool as a Jupiter
A Galaxy Far, Far, Far Away
Intruder Alert: Sweeping Space for Dust
Technology and Engineering
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
Shape Shifting
Dancing with Robots
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
Pronouns
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Robots on a Rocky Road
Revving Up Green Machines
Middle school science adventures
Weather
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Earth's Poles in Peril
Where rivers run uphill
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Sticky Silky Feet

Comic book superhero Spider-Man uses tiny hairs on his fingertips to climb up walls. But he could have had another secret weapon to help him stick. Scientists have now found that some spiders can also make silk in their feet, which may sometimes help them get a firmer grip on a surface. Spiders are good at gripping walls with their legs. Thousands of little hairs on their feet make it possible. To test whether spiders also make these hairs wet to improve grip, scientists watched zebra tarantulas crawl up glass slides. When they tilted a glass slide until it was almost vertical, the spider slipped a few millimeters before attaching itself again. The scientists were surprised to see little threads stretching from its feet to the slide. When they studied the spider's feet under a special microscope, they found tiny silk-shooting spouts among the hairs. This was a surprise because scientists had previously thought spiders only use special organs near their stomachs to make silk. It's possible that, a long time ago, feet were the first body parts of spiders to produce silk. Only later in their evolutionary history did spiders develop spinnerets on their abdomens to produce silk for webs. If so, the researchers say, this could mean that the silk's original purpose was to help spiders climb and stick, rather than to build homes or trap prey.óC. Gramling

Sticky Silky Feet
Sticky Silky Feet








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