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A Wild Ferret Rise
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A Big, Weird Dino
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E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Rodent Rubbish as an Ice-Age Thermometer
Deep Drilling at Sea
A Great Quake Coming?
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The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
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Watching deep-space fireworks
Salt and Early Civilization
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Dogfish
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The Color of Health
Making good, brown fat
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GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
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GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
Detecting True Art
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Losing with Heads or Tails
Human Body
Attacking Asthma
A Fix for Injured Knees
Taste Messenger
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Invertebrates
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Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
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Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Speedy stars
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Plants
Sweet, Sticky Science
Nature's Alphabet
Surprise Visitor
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Slip-sliding away
Ready, Set, Supernova
The two faces of Mars
Technology and Engineering
A Clean Getaway
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Adjectives and Adverbs
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Reach for the Sky
Robots on a Rocky Road
Flying the Hyper Skies
Weather
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Arctic Melt
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Sticky Silky Feet

Comic book superhero Spider-Man uses tiny hairs on his fingertips to climb up walls. But he could have had another secret weapon to help him stick. Scientists have now found that some spiders can also make silk in their feet, which may sometimes help them get a firmer grip on a surface. Spiders are good at gripping walls with their legs. Thousands of little hairs on their feet make it possible. To test whether spiders also make these hairs wet to improve grip, scientists watched zebra tarantulas crawl up glass slides. When they tilted a glass slide until it was almost vertical, the spider slipped a few millimeters before attaching itself again. The scientists were surprised to see little threads stretching from its feet to the slide. When they studied the spider's feet under a special microscope, they found tiny silk-shooting spouts among the hairs. This was a surprise because scientists had previously thought spiders only use special organs near their stomachs to make silk. It's possible that, a long time ago, feet were the first body parts of spiders to produce silk. Only later in their evolutionary history did spiders develop spinnerets on their abdomens to produce silk for webs. If so, the researchers say, this could mean that the silk's original purpose was to help spiders climb and stick, rather than to build homes or trap prey.óC. Gramling

Sticky Silky Feet
Sticky Silky Feet








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