Agriculture
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Middle school science adventures
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Salamanders
Bullfrogs
Animals
From Chimps to People
Lucky Survival for Black Cats
Vampire Bats on the Run
Behavior
Seeing red means danger ahead
Internet Generation
A Light Delay
Birds
Lovebirds
Condors
Woodpecker
Chemistry and Materials
Sticky Silky Feet
Atom Hauler
Flytrap Machine
Computers
Nonstop Robot
Play for Science
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino Takeout for Mammals
A Rainforest Trapped in Amber
Fingerprinting Fossils
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Earth's Lowly Rumble
Rodent Rubbish as an Ice-Age Thermometer
Watering the Air
Environment
Snow Traps
The Wolf and the Cow
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
Finding the Past
Watching deep-space fireworks
Big Woman of the Distant Past
A Long Haul
Fish
Whale Sharks
Sturgeons
Puffer Fish
Food and Nutrition
Eat Out, Eat Smart
Food for Life
The Color of Health
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Pronouns
Whoever vs. Whomever
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Setting a Prime Number Record
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Human Body
Surviving Olympic Heat
Disease Detectives
Teen Brains, Under Construction
Invertebrates
Wasps
Mosquitos
Beetles
Mammals
Dogs
Moles
Raccoons
Parents
How children learn
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Dreams of Floating in Space
IceCube Science
Einstein's Skateboard
Plants
Assembling the Tree of Life
Bright Blooms That Glow
Springing forward
Reptiles
Lizards
Black Mamba
Crocodiles
Space and Astronomy
Icy Red Planet
Super Star Cluster in the Neighborhood
A Great Ball of Fire
Technology and Engineering
A Satellite of Your Own
Musclebots Take Some Steps
Crime Lab
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Flying the Hyper Skies
Robots on the Road, Again
Weather
Where rivers run uphill
Arctic Melt
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
Add your Article

Spotting the World's Leggiest Animal

Although their name literally means "thousand legs," most millipedes have no more than 300 legs. The record holder is a millipede named Illacme plenipes, which has nearly 750 legs. It's the most legs ever observed on any animal. You'd think it would be hard to lose an animal with so many legs, but that's exactly what happened to this particular millipede. No one had seen one for 79 years until researchers recently spotted the critter in San Benito County, California, which is located several hours south of San Francisco. There are more than 1,000 species of millipedes worldwide. Distantly related to lobsters and shrimp, these animals have four legs per body segment. They don't bite, sting, or carry diseases. Luckily for many other creatures, they spend a lot of time eating dead leaves and recycling the nutrients into the soil. In contrast, centipedes have two legs per body segment, and some have a dangerous bite. I. plenipes was first observed in 1926 by a scientist who was one of the pioneers of millipede studies in North America. Later, when other specialists scoured the same small area in California looking for these millipedes, they came back empty-handed. Part of the problem is that the leggy creatures are hard to see. Despite their many legs, adults measure less than 3.4 centimeters (1.3 inches) long and about half a millimeter (0.02 inch) wide. "It's pretty hard to immediately tell the difference between this tiny threadlike thing and a [plant] root hair," says millipede expert Paul Marek of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. Last year, Marek and his brother visited the area where I. plenipes had originally been found. They came around Thanksgiving during the rainy season, when millipedes, which like wet conditions, are more likely to crawl from their underground lairs to the surface. After about an hour of searching, they spied a moving squiggle. It was a living I. plenipes. Marek says he was so excited that he was probably close to hyperventilating. Over several more visits, the brothers and a colleague collected 12 millipedes (leaving at least as many behind). The adults had between 318 and 666 legs. There are more than 1,000 species of millipedes worldwide. Distantly related to lobsters and shrimp, these animals have four legs per body segment. They don't bite, sting, or carry diseases. Luckily for many other creatures, they spend a lot of time eating dead leaves and recycling the nutrients into the soil. In contrast, centipedes have two legs per body segment, and some have a dangerous bite. I. plenipes was first observed in 1926 by a scientist who was one of the pioneers of millipede studies in North America. Later, when other specialists scoured the same small area in California looking for these millipedes, they came back empty-handed. Part of the problem is that the leggy creatures are hard to see. Despite their many legs, adults measure less than 3.4 centimeters (1.3 inches) long and about half a millimeter (0.02 inch) wide. "It's pretty hard to immediately tell the difference between this tiny threadlike thing and a [plant] root hair," says millipede expert Paul Marek of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. Last year, Marek and his brother visited the area where I. plenipes had originally been found. They came around Thanksgiving during the rainy season, when millipedes, which like wet conditions, are more likely to crawl from their underground lairs to the surface. After about an hour of searching, they spied a moving squiggle. It was a living I. plenipes. Marek says he was so excited that he was probably close to hyperventilating. Over several more visits, the brothers and a colleague collected 12 millipedes (leaving at least as many behind). The adults had between 318 and 666 legs. There are more than 1,000 species of millipedes worldwide. Distantly related to lobsters and shrimp, these animals have four legs per body segment. They don't bite, sting, or carry diseases. Luckily for many other creatures, they spend a lot of time eating dead leaves and recycling the nutrients into the soil. In contrast, centipedes have two legs per body segment, and some have a dangerous bite. I. plenipes was first observed in 1926 by a scientist who was one of the pioneers of millipede studies in North America. Later, when other specialists scoured the same small area in California looking for these millipedes, they came back empty-handed. Part of the problem is that the leggy creatures are hard to see. Despite their many legs, adults measure less than 3.4 centimeters (1.3 inches) long and about half a millimeter (0.02 inch) wide. "It's pretty hard to immediately tell the difference between this tiny threadlike thing and a [plant] root hair," says millipede expert Paul Marek of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. Last year, Marek and his brother visited the area where I. plenipes had originally been found. They came around Thanksgiving during the rainy season, when millipedes, which like wet conditions, are more likely to crawl from their underground lairs to the surface. After about an hour of searching, they spied a moving squiggle. It was a living I. plenipes. Marek says he was so excited that he was probably close to hyperventilating. Over several more visits, the brothers and a colleague collected 12 millipedes (leaving at least as many behind). The adults had between 318 and 666 legs. There are more than 1,000 species of millipedes worldwide. Distantly related to lobsters and shrimp, these animals have four legs per body segment. They don't bite, sting, or carry diseases. Luckily for many other creatures, they spend a lot of time eating dead leaves and recycling the nutrients into the soil. In contrast, centipedes have two legs per body segment, and some have a dangerous bite. I. plenipes was first observed in 1926 by a scientist who was one of the pioneers of millipede studies in North America. Later, when other specialists scoured the same small area in California looking for these millipedes, they came back empty-handed. Part of the problem is that the leggy creatures are hard to see. Despite their many legs, adults measure less than 3.4 centimeters (1.3 inches) long and about half a millimeter (0.02 inch) wide. "It's pretty hard to immediately tell the difference between this tiny threadlike thing and a [plant] root hair," says millipede expert Paul Marek of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. Last year, Marek and his brother visited the area where I. plenipes had originally been found. They came around Thanksgiving during the rainy season, when millipedes, which like wet conditions, are more likely to crawl from their underground lairs to the surface. After about an hour of searching, they spied a moving squiggle. It was a living I. plenipes. Marek says he was so excited that he was probably close to hyperventilating. Over several more visits, the brothers and a colleague collected 12 millipedes (leaving at least as many behind). The adults had between 318 and 666 legs. There are more than 1,000 species of millipedes worldwide. Distantly related to lobsters and shrimp, these animals have four legs per body segment. They don't bite, sting, or carry diseases. Luckily for many other creatures, they spend a lot of time eating dead leaves and recycling the nutrients into the soil. In contrast, centipedes have two legs per body segment, and some have a dangerous bite. I. plenipes was first observed in 1926 by a scientist who was one of the pioneers of millipede studies in North America. Later, when other specialists scoured the same small area in California looking for these millipedes, they came back empty-handed. Part of the problem is that the leggy creatures are hard to see. Despite their many legs, adults measure less than 3.4 centimeters (1.3 inches) long and about half a millimeter (0.02 inch) wide. "It's pretty hard to immediately tell the difference between this tiny threadlike thing and a [plant] root hair," says millipede expert Paul Marek of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. Last year, Marek and his brother visited the area where I. plenipes had originally been found. They came around Thanksgiving during the rainy season, when millipedes, which like wet conditions, are more likely to crawl from their underground lairs to the surface. After about an hour of searching, they spied a moving squiggle. It was a living I. plenipes. Marek says he was so excited that he was probably close to hyperventilating. Over several more visits, the brothers and a colleague collected 12 millipedes (leaving at least as many behind). The adults had between 318 and 666 legs. There are more than 1,000 species of millipedes worldwide. Distantly related to lobsters and shrimp, these animals have four legs per body segment. They don't bite, sting, or carry diseases. Luckily for many other creatures, they spend a lot of time eating dead leaves and recycling the nutrients into the soil. In contrast, centipedes have two legs per body segment, and some have a dangerous bite. I. plenipes was first observed in 1926 by a scientist who was one of the pioneers of millipede studies in North America. Later, when other specialists scoured the same small area in California looking for these millipedes, they came back empty-handed. Part of the problem is that the leggy creatures are hard to see. Despite their many legs, adults measure less than 3.4 centimeters (1.3 inches) long and about half a millimeter (0.02 inch) wide. "It's pretty hard to immediately tell the difference between this tiny threadlike thing and a [plant] root hair," says millipede expert Paul Marek of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. Last year, Marek and his brother visited the area where I. plenipes had originally been found. They came around Thanksgiving during the rainy season, when millipedes, which like wet conditions, are more likely to crawl from their underground lairs to the surface. After about an hour of searching, they spied a moving squiggle. It was a living I. plenipes. Marek says he was so excited that he was probably close to hyperventilating. Over several more visits, the brothers and a colleague collected 12 millipedes (leaving at least as many behind). The adults had between 318 and 666 legs. There are more than 1,000 species of millipedes worldwide. Distantly related to lobsters and shrimp, these animals have four legs per body segment. They don't bite, sting, or carry diseases. Luckily for many other creatures, they spend a lot of time eating dead leaves and recycling the nutrients into the soil. In contrast, centipedes have two legs per body segment, and some have a dangerous bite. I. plenipes was first observed in 1926 by a scientist who was one of the pioneers of millipede studies in North America. Later, when other specialists scoured the same small area in California looking for these millipedes, they came back empty-handed. Part of the problem is that the leggy creatures are hard to see. Despite their many legs, adults measure less than 3.4 centimeters (1.3 inches) long and about half a millimeter (0.02 inch) wide. "It's pretty hard to immediately tell the difference between this tiny threadlike thing and a [plant] root hair," says millipede expert Paul Marek of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. Last year, Marek and his brother visited the area where I. plenipes had originally been found. They came around Thanksgiving during the rainy season, when millipedes, which like wet conditions, are more likely to crawl from their underground lairs to the surface. After about an hour of searching, they spied a moving squiggle. It was a living I. plenipes. Marek says he was so excited that he was probably close to hyperventilating. Over several more visits, the brothers and a colleague collected 12 millipedes (leaving at least as many behind). The adults had between 318 and 666 legs. There are more than 1,000 species of millipedes worldwide. Distantly related to lobsters and shrimp, these animals have four legs per body segment. They don't bite, sting, or carry diseases. Luckily for many other creatures, they spend a lot of time eating dead leaves and recycling the nutrients into the soil. In contrast, centipedes have two legs per body segment, and some have a dangerous bite. I. plenipes was first observed in 1926 by a scientist who was one of the pioneers of millipede studies in North America. Later, when other specialists scoured the same small area in California looking for these millipedes, they came back empty-handed. Part of the problem is that the leggy creatures are hard to see. Despite their many legs, adults measure less than 3.4 centimeters (1.3 inches) long and about half a millimeter (0.02 inch) wide. "It's pretty hard to immediately tell the difference between this tiny threadlike thing and a [plant] root hair," says millipede expert Paul Marek of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. Last year, Marek and his brother visited the area where I. plenipes had originally been found. They came around Thanksgiving during the rainy season, when millipedes, which like wet conditions, are more likely to crawl from their underground lairs to the surface. After about an hour of searching, they spied a moving squiggle. It was a living I. plenipes. Marek says he was so excited that he was probably close to hyperventilating. Over several more visits, the brothers and a colleague collected 12 millipedes (leaving at least as many behind). The adults had between 318 and 666 legs. There are more than 1,000 species of millipedes worldwide. Distantly related to lobsters and shrimp, these animals have four legs per body segment. They don't bite, sting, or carry diseases. Luckily for many other creatures, they spend a lot of time eating dead leaves and recycling the nutrients into the soil. In contrast, centipedes have two legs per body segment, and some have a dangerous bite. I. plenipes was first observed in 1926 by a scientist who was one of the pioneers of millipede studies in North America. Later, when other specialists scoured the same small area in California looking for these millipedes, they came back empty-handed. Part of the problem is that the leggy creatures are hard to see. Despite their many legs, adults measure less than 3.4 centimeters (1.3 inches) long and about half a millimeter (0.02 inch) wide. "It's pretty hard to immediately tell the difference between this tiny threadlike thing and a [plant] root hair," says millipede expert Paul Marek of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. Last year, Marek and his brother visited the area where I. plenipes had originally been found. They came around Thanksgiving during the rainy season, when millipedes, which like wet conditions, are more likely to crawl from their underground lairs to the surface. After about an hour of searching, they spied a moving squiggle. It was a living I. plenipes. Marek says he was so excited that he was probably close to hyperventilating. Over several more visits, the brothers and a colleague collected 12 millipedes (leaving at least as many behind). The adults had between 318 and 666 legs. There are more than 1,000 species of millipedes worldwide. Distantly related to lobsters and shrimp, these animals have four legs per body segment. They don't bite, sting, or carry diseases. Luckily for many other creatures, they spend a lot of time eating dead leaves and recycling the nutrients into the soil. In contrast, centipedes have two legs per body segment, and some have a dangerous bite. I. plenipes was first observed in 1926 by a scientist who was one of the pioneers of millipede studies in North America. Later, when other specialists scoured the same small area in California looking for these millipedes, they came back empty-handed. Part of the problem is that the leggy creatures are hard to see. Despite their many legs, adults measure less than 3.4 centimeters (1.3 inches) long and about half a millimeter (0.02 inch) wide. "It's pretty hard to immediately tell the difference between this tiny threadlike thing and a [plant] root hair," says millipede expert Paul Marek of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. Last year, Marek and his brother visited the area where I. plenipes had originally been found. They came around Thanksgiving during the rainy season, when millipedes, which like wet conditions, are more likely to crawl from their underground lairs to the surface. After about an hour of searching, they spied a moving squiggle. It was a living I. plenipes. Marek says he was so excited that he was probably close to hyperventilating. Over several more visits, the brothers and a colleague collected 12 millipedes (leaving at least as many behind). The adults had between 318 and 666 legs. There are more than 1,000 species of millipedes worldwide. Distantly related to lobsters and shrimp, these animals have four legs per body segment. They don't bite, sting, or carry diseases. Luckily for many other creatures, they spend a lot of time eating dead leaves and recycling the nutrients into the soil. In contrast, centipedes have two legs per body segment, and some have a dangerous bite. I. plenipes was first observed in 1926 by a scientist who was one of the pioneers of millipede studies in North America. Later, when other specialists scoured the same small area in California looking for these millipedes, they came back empty-handed. Part of the problem is that the leggy creatures are hard to see. Despite their many legs, adults measure less than 3.4 centimeters (1.3 inches) long and about half a millimeter (0.02 inch) wide. "It's pretty hard to immediately tell the difference between this tiny threadlike thing and a [plant] root hair," says millipede expert Paul Marek of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. Last year, Marek and his brother visited the area where I. plenipes had originally been found. They came around Thanksgiving during the rainy season, when millipedes, which like wet conditions, are more likely to crawl from their underground lairs to the surface. After about an hour of searching, they spied a moving squiggle. It was a living I. plenipes. Marek says he was so excited that he was probably close to hyperventilating. Over several more visits, the brothers and a colleague collected 12 millipedes (leaving at least as many behind). The adults had between 318 and 666 legs. There are more than 1,000 species of millipedes worldwide. Distantly related to lobsters and shrimp, these animals have four legs per body segment. They don't bite, sting, or carry diseases. Luckily for many other creatures, they spend a lot of time eating dead leaves and recycling the nutrients into the soil. In contrast, centipedes have two legs per body segment, and some have a dangerous bite. I. plenipes was first observed in 1926 by a scientist who was one of the pioneers of millipede studies in North America. Later, when other specialists scoured the same small area in California looking for these millipedes, they came back empty-handed. Part of the problem is that the leggy creatures are hard to see. Despite their many legs, adults measure less than 3.4 centimeters (1.3 inches) long and about half a millimeter (0.02 inch) wide. "It's pretty hard to immediately tell the difference between this tiny threadlike thing and a [plant] root hair," says millipede expert Paul Marek of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. Last year, Marek and his brother visited the area where I. plenipes had originally been found. They came around Thanksgiving during the rainy season, when millipedes, which like wet conditions, are more likely to crawl from their underground lairs to the surface. After about an hour of searching, they spied a moving squiggle. It was a living I. plenipes. Marek says he was so excited that he was probably close to hyperventilating. Over several more visits, the brothers and a colleague collected 12 millipedes (leaving at least as many behind). The adults had between 318 and 666 legs. There are more than 1,000 species of millipedes worldwide. Distantly related to lobsters and shrimp, these animals have four legs per body segment. They don't bite, sting, or carry diseases. Luckily for many other creatures, they spend a lot of time eating dead leaves and recycling the nutrients into the soil. In contrast, centipedes have two legs per body segment, and some have a dangerous bite. I. plenipes was first observed in 1926 by a scientist who was one of the pioneers of millipede studies in North America. Later, when other specialists scoured the same small area in California looking for these millipedes, they came back empty-handed. Part of the problem is that the leggy creatures are hard to see. Despite their many legs, adults measure less than 3.4 centimeters (1.3 inches) long and about half a millimeter (0.02 inch) wide. "It's pretty hard to immediately tell the difference between this tiny threadlike thing and a [plant] root hair," says millipede expert Paul Marek of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. Last year, Marek and his brother visited the area where I. plenipes had originally been found. They came around Thanksgiving during the rainy season, when millipedes, which like wet conditions, are more likely to crawl from their underground lairs to the surface. After about an hour of searching, they spied a moving squiggle. It was a living I. plenipes. Marek says he was so excited that he was probably close to hyperventilating. Over several more visits, the brothers and a colleague collected 12 millipedes (leaving at least as many behind). The adults had between 318 and 666 legs. There are more than 1,000 species of millipedes worldwide. Distantly related to lobsters and shrimp, these animals have four legs per body segment. They don't bite, sting, or carry diseases. Luckily for many other creatures, they spend a lot of time eating dead leaves and recycling the nutrients into the soil. In contrast, centipedes have two legs per body segment, and some have a dangerous bite. I. plenipes was first observed in 1926 by a scientist who was one of the pioneers of millipede studies in North America. Later, when other specialists scoured the same small area in California looking for these millipedes, they came back empty-handed. Part of the problem is that the leggy creatures are hard to see. Despite their many legs, adults measure less than 3.4 centimeters (1.3 inches) long and about half a millimeter (0.02 inch) wide. "It's pretty hard to immediately tell the difference between this tiny threadlike thing and a [plant] root hair," says millipede expert Paul Marek of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. Last year, Marek and his brother visited the area where I. plenipes had originally been found. They came around Thanksgiving during the rainy season, when millipedes, which like wet conditions, are more likely to crawl from their underground lairs to the surface. After about an hour of searching, they spied a moving squiggle. It was a living I. plenipes. Marek says he was so excited that he was probably close to hyperventilating. Over several more visits, the brothers and a colleague collected 12 millipedes (leaving at least as many behind). The adults had between 318 and 666 legs. There are more than 1,000 species of millipedes worldwide. Distantly related to lobsters and shrimp, these animals have four legs per body segment. They don't bite, sting, or carry diseases. Luckily for many other creatures, they spend a lot of time eating dead leaves and recycling the nutrients into the soil. In contrast, centipedes have two legs per body segment, and some have a dangerous bite. I. plenipes was first observed in 1926 by a scientist who was one of the pioneers of millipede studies in North America. Later, when other specialists scoured the same small area in California looking for these millipedes, they came back empty-handed. Part of the problem is that the leggy creatures are hard to see. Despite their many legs, adults measure less than 3.4 centimeters (1.3 inches) long and about half a millimeter (0.02 inch) wide. "It's pretty hard to immediately tell the difference between this tiny threadlike thing and a [plant] root hair," says millipede expert Paul Marek of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. Last year, Marek and his brother visited the area where I. plenipes had originally been found. They came around Thanksgiving during the rainy season, when millipedes, which like wet conditions, are more likely to crawl from their underground lairs to the surface. After about an hour of searching, they spied a moving squiggle. It was a living I. plenipes. Marek says he was so excited that he was probably close to hyperventilating. Over several more visits, the brothers and a colleague collected 12 millipedes (leaving at least as many behind). The adults had between 318 and 666 legs. There are more than 1,000 species of millipedes worldwide. Distantly related to lobsters and shrimp, these animals have four legs per body segment. They don't bite, sting, or carry diseases. Luckily for many other creatures, they spend a lot of time eating dead leaves and recycling the nutrients into the soil. In contrast, centipedes have two legs per body segment, and some have a dangerous bite. I. plenipes was first observed in 1926 by a scientist who was one of the pioneers of millipede studies in North America. Later, when other specialists scoured the same small area in California looking for these millipedes, they came back empty-handed. Part of the problem is that the leggy creatures are hard to see. Despite their many legs, adults measure less than 3.4 centimeters (1.3 inches) long and about half a millimeter (0.02 inch) wide. "It's pretty hard to immediately tell the difference between this tiny threadlike thing and a [plant] root hair," says millipede expert Paul Marek of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. Last year, Marek and his brother visited the area where I. plenipes had originally been found. They came around Thanksgiving during the rainy season, when millipedes, which like wet conditions, are more likely to crawl from their underground lairs to the surface. After about an hour of searching, they spied a moving squiggle. It was a living I. plenipes. Marek says he was so excited that he was probably close to hyperventilating. Over several more visits, the brothers and a colleague collected 12 millipedes (leaving at least as many behind). The adults had between 318 and 666 legs. There are more than 1,000 species of millipedes worldwide. Distantly related to lobsters and shrimp, these animals have four legs per body segment. They don't bite, sting, or carry diseases. Luckily for many other creatures, they spend a lot of time eating dead leaves and recycling the nutrients into the soil. In contrast, centipedes have two legs per body segment, and some have a dangerous bite. I. plenipes was first observed in 1926 by a scientist who was one of the pioneers of millipede studies in North America. Later, when other specialists scoured the same small area in California looking for these millipedes, they came back empty-handed. Part of the problem is that the leggy creatures are hard to see. Despite their many legs, adults measure less than 3.4 centimeters (1.3 inches) long and about half a millimeter (0.02 inch) wide. "It's pretty hard to immediately tell the difference between this tiny threadlike thing and a [plant] root hair," says millipede expert Paul Marek of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. Last year, Marek and his brother visited the area where I. plenipes had originally been found. They came around Thanksgiving during the rainy season, when millipedes, which like wet conditions, are more likely to crawl from their underground lairs to the surface. After about an hour of searching, they spied a moving squiggle. It was a living I. plenipes. Marek says he was so excited that he was probably close to hyperventilating. Over several more visits, the brothers and a colleague collected 12 millipedes (leaving at least as many behind). The adults had between 318 and 666 legs. There are more than 1,000 species of millipedes worldwide. Distantly related to lobsters and shrimp, these animals have four legs per body segment. They don't bite, sting, or carry diseases. Luckily for many other creatures, they spend a lot of time eating dead leaves and recycling the nutrients into the soil. In contrast, centipedes have two legs per body segment, and some have a dangerous bite. I. plenipes was first observed in 1926 by a scientist who was one of the pioneers of millipede studies in North America. Later, when other specialists scoured the same small area in California looking for these millipedes, they came back empty-handed. Part of the problem is that the leggy creatures are hard to see. Despite their many legs, adults measure less than 3.4 centimeters (1.3 inches) long and about half a millimeter (0.02 inch) wide. "It's pretty hard to immediately tell the difference between this tiny threadlike thing and a [plant] root hair," says millipede expert Paul Marek of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. Last year, Marek and his brother visited the area where I. plenipes had originally been found. They came around Thanksgiving during the rainy season, when millipedes, which like wet conditions, are more likely to crawl from their underground lairs to the surface. After about an hour of searching, they spied a moving squiggle. It was a living I. plenipes. Marek says he was so excited that he was probably close to hyperventilating. Over several more visits, the brothers and a colleague collected 12 millipedes (leaving at least as many behind). The adults had between 318 and 666 legs. There are more than 1,000 species of millipedes worldwide. Distantly related to lobsters and shrimp, these animals have four legs per body segment. They don't bite, sting, or carry diseases. Luckily for many other creatures, they spend a lot of time eating dead leaves and recycling the nutrients into the soil. In contrast, centipedes have two legs per body segment, and some have a dangerous bite. I. plenipes was first observed in 1926 by a scientist who was one of the pioneers of millipede studies in North America. Later, when other specialists scoured the same small area in California looking for these millipedes, they came back empty-handed. Part of the problem is that the leggy creatures are hard to see. Despite their many legs, adults measure less than 3.4 centimeters (1.3 inches) long and about half a millimeter (0.02 inch) wide. "It's pretty hard to immediately tell the difference between this tiny threadlike thing and a [plant] root hair," says millipede expert Paul Marek of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. Last year, Marek and his brother visited the area where I. plenipes had originally been found. They came around Thanksgiving during the rainy season, when millipedes, which like wet conditions, are more likely to crawl from their underground lairs to the surface. After about an hour of searching, they spied a moving squiggle. It was a living I. plenipes. Marek says he was so excited that he was probably close to hyperventilating. Over several more visits, the brothers and a colleague collected 12 millipedes (leaving at least as many behind). The adults had between 318 and 666 legs. There are more than 1,000 species of millipedes worldwide. Distantly related to lobsters and shrimp, these animals have four legs per body segment. They don't bite, sting, or carry diseases. Luckily for many other creatures, they spend a lot of time eating dead leaves and recycling the nutrients into the soil. In contrast, centipedes have two legs per body segment, and some have a dangerous bite. I. plenipes was first observed in 1926 by a scientist who was one of the pioneers of millipede studies in North America. Later, when other specialists scoured the same small area in California looking for these millipedes, they came back empty-handed. Part of the problem is that the leggy creatures are hard to see. Despite their many legs, adults measure less than 3.4 centimeters (1.3 inches) long and about half a millimeter (0.02 inch) wide. "It's pretty hard to immediately tell the difference between this tiny threadlike thing and a [plant] root hair," says millipede expert Paul Marek of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. Last year, Marek and his brother visited the area where I. plenipes had originally been found. They came around Thanksgiving during the rainy season, when millipedes, which like wet conditions, are more likely to crawl from their underground lairs to the surface. After about an hour of searching, they spied a moving squiggle. It was a living I. plenipes. Marek says he was so excited that he was probably close to hyperventilating. Over several more visits, the brothers and a colleague collected 12 millipedes (leaving at least as many behind). The adults had between 318 and 666 legs. There are more than 1,000 species of millipedes worldwide. Distantly related to lobsters and shrimp, these animals have four legs per body segment. They don't bite, sting, or carry diseases. Luckily for many other creatures, they spend a lot of time eating dead leaves and recycling the nutrients into the soil. In contrast, centipedes have two legs per body segment, and some have a dangerous bite. I. plenipes was first observed in 1926 by a scientist who was one of the pioneers of millipede studies in North America. Later, when other specialists scoured the same small area in California looking for these millipedes, they came back empty-handed. Part of the problem is that the leggy creatures are hard to see. Despite their many legs, adults measure less than 3.4 centimeters (1.3 inches) long and about half a millimeter (0.02 inch) wide. "It's pretty hard to immediately tell the difference between this tiny threadlike thing and a [plant] root hair," says millipede expert Paul Marek of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. Last year, Marek and his brother visited the area where I. plenipes had originally been found. They came around Thanksgiving during the rainy season, when millipedes, which like wet conditions, are more likely to crawl from their underground lairs to the surface. After about an hour of searching, they spied a moving squiggle. It was a living I. plenipes. Marek says he was so excited that he was probably close to hyperventilating. Over several more visits, the brothers and a colleague collected 12 millipedes (leaving at least as many behind). The adults had between 318 and 666 legs. There are more than 1,000 species of millipedes worldwide. Distantly related to lobsters and shrimp, these animals have four legs per body segment. They don't bite, sting, or carry diseases. Luckily for many other creatures, they spend a lot of time eating dead leaves and recycling the nutrients into the soil. In contrast, centipedes have two legs per body segment, and some have a dangerous bite. I. plenipes was first observed in 1926 by a scientist who was one of the pioneers of millipede studies in North America. Later, when other specialists scoured the same small area in California looking for these millipedes, they came back empty-handed. Part of the problem is that the leggy creatures are hard to see. Despite their many legs, adults measure less than 3.4 centimeters (1.3 inches) long and about half a millimeter (0.02 inch) wide. "It's pretty hard to immediately tell the difference between this tiny threadlike thing and a [plant] root hair," says millipede expert Paul Marek of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. Last year, Marek and his brother visited the area where I. plenipes had originally been found. They came around Thanksgiving during the rainy season, when millipedes, which like wet conditions, are more likely to crawl from their underground lairs to the surface. After about an hour of searching, they spied a moving squiggle. It was a living I. plenipes. Marek says he was so excited that he was probably close to hyperventilating. Over several more visits, the brothers and a colleague collected 12 millipedes (leaving at least as many behind). The adults had between 318 and 666 legs. There are more than 1,000 species of millipedes worldwide. Distantly related to lobsters and shrimp, these animals have four legs per body segment. They don't bite, sting, or carry diseases. Luckily for many other creatures, they spend a lot of time eating dead leaves and recycling the nutrients into the soil. In contrast, centipedes have two legs per body segment, and some have a dangerous bite. I. plenipes was first observed in 1926 by a scientist who was one of the pioneers of millipede studies in North America. Later, when other specialists scoured the same small area in California looking for these millipedes, they came back empty-handed. Part of the problem is that the leggy creatures are hard to see. Despite their many legs, adults measure less than 3.4 centimeters (1.3 inches) long and about half a millimeter (0.02 inch) wide. "It's pretty hard to immediately tell the difference between this tiny threadlike thing and a [plant] root hair," says millipede expert Paul Marek of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. Last year, Marek and his brother visited the area where I. plenipes had originally been found. They came around Thanksgiving during the rainy season, when millipedes, which like wet conditions, are more likely to crawl from their underground lairs to the surface. After about an hour of searching, they spied a moving squiggle. It was a living I. plenipes. Marek says he was so excited that he was probably close to hyperventilating. Over several more visits, the brothers and a colleague collected 12 millipedes (leaving at least as many behind). The adults had between 318 and 666 legs. There are more than 1,000 species of millipedes worldwide. Distantly related to lobsters and shrimp, these animals have four legs per body segment. They don't bite, sting, or carry diseases. Luckily for many other creatures, they spend a lot of time eating dead leaves and recycling the nutrients into the soil. In contrast, centipedes have two legs per body segment, and some have a dangerous bite. I. plenipes was first observed in 1926 by a scientist who was one of the pioneers of millipede studies in North America. Later, when other specialists scoured the same small area in California looking for these millipedes, they came back empty-handed. Part of the problem is that the leggy creatures are hard to see. Despite their many legs, adults measure less than 3.4 centimeters (1.3 inches) long and about half a millimeter (0.02 inch) wide. "It's pretty hard to immediately tell the difference between this tiny threadlike thing and a [plant] root hair," says millipede expert Paul Marek of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. Last year, Marek and his brother visited the area where I. plenipes had originally been found. They came around Thanksgiving during the rainy season, when millipedes, which like wet conditions, are more likely to crawl from their underground lairs to the surface. After about an hour of searching, they spied a moving squiggle. It was a living I. plenipes. Marek says he was so excited that he was probably close to hyperventilating. Over several more visits, the brothers and a colleague collected 12 millipedes (leaving at least as many behind). The adults had between 318 and 666 legs. There are more than 1,000 species of millipedes worldwide. Distantly related to lobsters and shrimp, these animals have four legs per body segment. They don't bite, sting, or carry diseases. Luckily for many other creatures, they spend a lot of time eating dead leaves and recycling the nutrients into the soil. In contrast, centipedes have two legs per body segment, and some have a dangerous bite. I. plenipes was first observed in 1926 by a scientist who was one of the pioneers of millipede studies in North America. Later, when other specialists scoured the same small area in California looking for these millipedes, they came back empty-handed. Part of the problem is that the leggy creatures are hard to see. Despite their many legs, adults measure less than 3.4 centimeters (1.3 inches) long and about half a millimeter (0.02 inch) wide. "It's pretty hard to immediately tell the difference between this tiny threadlike thing and a [plant] root hair," says millipede expert Paul Marek of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. Last year, Marek and his brother visited the area where I. plenipes had originally been found. They came around Thanksgiving during the rainy season, when millipedes, which like wet conditions, are more likely to crawl from their underground lairs to the surface. After about an hour of searching, they spied a moving squiggle. It was a living I. plenipes. Marek says he was so excited that he was probably close to hyperventilating. Over several more visits, the brothers and a colleague collected 12 millipedes (leaving at least as many behind). The adults had between 318 and 666 legs. There are more than 1,000 species of millipedes worldwide. Distantly related to lobsters and shrimp, these animals have four legs per body segment. They don't bite, sting, or carry diseases. Luckily for many other creatures, they spend a lot of time eating dead leaves and recycling the nutrients into the soil. In contrast, centipedes have two legs per body segment, and some have a dangerous bite. I. plenipes was first observed in 1926 by a scientist who was one of the pioneers of millipede studies in North America. Later, when other specialists scoured the same small area in California looking for these millipedes, they came back empty-handed. Part of the problem is that the leggy creatures are hard to see. Despite their many legs, adults measure less than 3.4 centimeters (1.3 inches) long and about half a millimeter (0.02 inch) wide. "It's pretty hard to immediately tell the difference between this tiny threadlike thing and a [plant] root hair," says millipede expert Paul Marek of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. Last year, Marek and his brother visited the area where I. plenipes had originally been found. They came around Thanksgiving during the rainy season, when millipedes, which like wet conditions, are more likely to crawl from their underground lairs to the surface. After about an hour of searching, they spied a moving squiggle. It was a living I. plenipes. Marek says he was so excited that he was probably close to hyperventilating. Over several more visits, the brothers and a colleague collected 12 millipedes (leaving at least as many behind). The adults had between 318 and 666 legs. There are more than 1,000 species of millipedes worldwide. Distantly related to lobsters and shrimp, these animals have four legs per body segment. They don't bite, sting, or carry diseases. Luckily for many other creatures, they spend a lot of time eating dead leaves and recycling the nutrients into the soil. In contrast, centipedes have two legs per body segment, and some have a dangerous bite. I. plenipes was first observed in 1926 by a scientist who was one of the pioneers of millipede studies in North America. Later, when other specialists scoured the same small area in California looking for these millipedes, they came back empty-handed. Part of the problem is that the leggy creatures are hard to see. Despite their many legs, adults measure less than 3.4 centimeters (1.3 inches) long and about half a millimeter (0.02 inch) wide. "It's pretty hard to immediately tell the difference between this tiny threadlike thing and a [plant] root hair," says millipede expert Paul Marek of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. Last year, Marek and his brother visited the area where I. plenipes had originally been found. They came around Thanksgiving during the rainy season, when millipedes, which like wet conditions, are more likely to crawl from their underground lairs to the surface. After about an hour of searching, they spied a moving squiggle. It was a living I. plenipes. Marek says he was so excited that he was probably close to hyperventilating. Over several more visits, the brothers and a colleague collected 12 millipedes (leaving at least as many behind). The adults had between 318 and 666 legs. There are more than 1,000 species of millipedes worldwide. Distantly related to lobsters and shrimp, these animals have four legs per body segment. They don't bite, sting, or carry diseases. Luckily for many other creatures, they spend a lot of time eating dead leaves and recycling the nutrients into the soil. In contrast, centipedes have two legs per body segment, and some have a dangerous bite. I. plenipes was first observed in 1926 by a scientist who was one of the pioneers of millipede studies in North America. Later, when other specialists scoured the same small area in California looking for these millipedes, they came back empty-handed. Part of the problem is that the leggy creatures are hard to see. Despite their many legs, adults measure less than 3.4 centimeters (1.3 inches) long and about half a millimeter (0.02 inch) wide. "It's pretty hard to immediately tell the difference between this tiny threadlike thing and a [plant] root hair," says millipede expert Paul Marek of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. Last year, Marek and his brother visited the area where I. plenipes had originally been found. They came around Thanksgiving during the rainy season, when millipedes, which like wet conditions, are more likely to crawl from their underground lairs to the surface. After about an hour of searching, they spied a moving squiggle. It was a living I. plenipes. Marek says he was so excited that he was probably close to hyperventilating. Over several more visits, the brothers and a colleague collected 12 millipedes (leaving at least as many behind). The adults had between 318 and 666 legs. There are more than 1,000 species of millipedes worldwide. Distantly related to lobsters and shrimp, these animals have four legs per body segment. They don't bite, sting, or carry diseases. Luckily for many other creatures, they spend a lot of time eating dead leaves and recycling the nutrients into the soil. In contrast, centipedes have two legs per body segment, and some have a dangerous bite. I. plenipes was first observed in 1926 by a scientist who was one of the pioneers of millipede studies in North America. Later, when other specialists scoured the same small area in California looking for these millipedes, they came back empty-handed. Part of the problem is that the leggy creatures are hard to see. Despite their many legs, adults measure less than 3.4 centimeters (1.3 inches) long and about half a millimeter (0.02 inch) wide. "It's pretty hard to immediately tell the difference between this tiny threadlike thing and a [plant] root hair," says millipede expert Paul Marek of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. Last year, Marek and his brother visited the area where I. plenipes had originally been found. They came around Thanksgiving during the rainy season, when millipedes, which like wet conditions, are more likely to crawl from their underground lairs to the surface. After about an hour of searching, they spied a moving squiggle. It was a living I. plenipes. Marek says he was so excited that he was probably close to hyperventilating. Over several more visits, the brothers and a colleague collected 12 millipedes (leaving at least as many behind). The adults had between 318 and 666 legs. There are more than 1,000 species of millipedes worldwide. Distantly related to lobsters and shrimp, these animals have four legs per body segment. They don't bite, sting, or carry diseases. Luckily for many other creatures, they spend a lot of time eating dead leaves and recycling the nutrients into the soil. In contrast, centipedes have two legs per body segment, and some have a dangerous bite. I. plenipes was first observed in 1926 by a scientist who was one of the pioneers of millipede studies in North America. Later, when other specialists scoured the same small area in California looking for these millipedes, they came back empty-handed. Part of the problem is that the leggy creatures are hard to see. Despite their many legs, adults measure less than 3.4 centimeters (1.3 inches) long and about half a millimeter (0.02 inch) wide. "It's pretty hard to immediately tell the difference between this tiny threadlike thing and a [plant] root hair," says millipede expert Paul Marek of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. Last year, Marek and his brother visited the area where I. plenipes had originally been found. They came around Thanksgiving during the rainy season, when millipedes, which like wet conditions, are more likely to crawl from their underground lairs to the surface. After about an hour of searching, they spied a moving squiggle. It was a living I. plenipes. Marek says he was so excited that he was probably close to hyperventilating. Over several more visits, the brothers and a colleague collected 12 millipedes (leaving at least as many behind). The adults had between 318 and 666 legs. There are more than 1,000 species of millipedes worldwide. Distantly related to lobsters and shrimp, these animals have four legs per body segment. They don't bite, sting, or carry diseases. Luckily for many other creatures, they spend a lot of time eating dead leaves and recycling the nutrients into the soil. In contrast, centipedes have two legs per body segment, and some have a dangerous bite. I. plenipes was first observed in 1926 by a scientist who was one of the pioneers of millipede studies in North America. Later, when other specialists scoured the same small area in California looking for these millipedes, they came back empty-handed. Part of the problem is that the leggy creatures are hard to see. Despite their many legs, adults measure less than 3.4 centimeters (1.3 inches) long and about half a millimeter (0.02 inch) wide. "It's pretty hard to immediately tell the difference between this tiny threadlike thing and a [plant] root hair," says millipede expert Paul Marek of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. Last year, Marek and his brother visited the area where I. plenipes had originally been found. They came around Thanksgiving during the rainy season, when millipedes, which like wet conditions, are more likely to crawl from their underground lairs to the surface. After about an hour of searching, they spied a moving squiggle. It was a living I. plenipes. Marek says he was so excited that he was probably close to hyperventilating. Over several more visits, the brothers and a colleague collected 12 millipedes (leaving at least as many behind). The adults had between 318 and 666 legs. There are more than 1,000 species of millipedes worldwide. Distantly related to lobsters and shrimp, these animals have four legs per body segment. They don't bite, sting, or carry diseases. Luckily for many other creatures, they spend a lot of time eating dead leaves and recycling the nutrients into the soil. In contrast, centipedes have two legs per body segment, and some have a dangerous bite. I. plenipes was first observed in 1926 by a scientist who was one of the pioneers of millipede studies in North America. Later, when other specialists scoured the same small area in California looking for these millipedes, they came back empty-handed. Part of the problem is that the leggy creatures are hard to see. Despite their many legs, adults measure less than 3.4 centimeters (1.3 inches) long and about half a millimeter (0.02 inch) wide. "It's pretty hard to immediately tell the difference between this tiny threadlike thing and a [plant] root hair," says millipede expert Paul Marek of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. Last year, Marek and his brother visited the area where I. plenipes had originally been found. They came around Thanksgiving during the rainy season, when millipedes, which like wet conditions, are more likely to crawl from their underground lairs to the surface. After about an hour of searching, they spied a moving squiggle. It was a living I. plenipes. Marek says he was so excited that he was probably close to hyperventilating. Over several more visits, the brothers and a colleague collected 12 millipedes (leaving at least as many behind). The adults had between 318 and 666 legs. There are more than 1,000 species of millipedes worldwide. Distantly related to lobsters and shrimp, these animals have four legs per body segment. They don't bite, sting, or carry diseases. Luckily for many other creatures, they spend a lot of time eating dead leaves and recycling the nutrients into the soil. In contrast, centipedes have two legs per body segment, and some have a dangerous bite. I. plenipes was first observed in 1926 by a scientist who was one of the pioneers of millipede studies in North America. Later, when other specialists scoured the same small area in California looking for these millipedes, they came back empty-handed. Part of the problem is that the leggy creatures are hard to see. Despite their many legs, adults measure less than 3.4 centimeters (1.3 inches) long and about half a millimeter (0.02 inch) wide. "It's pretty hard to immediately tell the difference between this tiny threadlike thing and a [plant] root hair," says millipede expert Paul Marek of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. Last year, Marek and his brother visited the area where I. plenipes had originally been found. They came around Thanksgiving during the rainy season, when millipedes, which like wet conditions, are more likely to crawl from their underground lairs to the surface. After about an hour of searching, they spied a moving squiggle. It was a living I. plenipes. Marek says he was so excited that he was probably close to hyperventilating. Over several more visits, the brothers and a colleague collected 12 millipedes (leaving at least as many behind). The adults had between 318 and 666 legs. There are more than 1,000 species of millipedes worldwide. Distantly related to lobsters and shrimp, these animals have four legs per body segment. They don't bite, sting, or carry diseases. Luckily for many other creatures, they spend a lot of time eating dead leaves and recycling the nutrients into the soil. In contrast, centipedes have two legs per body segment, and some have a dangerous bite. I. plenipes was first observed in 1926 by a scientist who was one of the pioneers of millipede studies in North America. Later, when other specialists scoured the same small area in California looking for these millipedes, they came back empty-handed. Part of the problem is that the leggy creatures are hard to see. Despite their many legs, adults measure less than 3.4 centimeters (1.3 inches) long and about half a millimeter (0.02 inch) wide. "It's pretty hard to immediately tell the difference between this tiny threadlike thing and a [plant] root hair," says millipede expert Paul Marek of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. Last year, Marek and his brother visited the area where I. plenipes had originally been found. They came around Thanksgiving during the rainy season, when millipedes, which like wet conditions, are more likely to crawl from their underground lairs to the surface. After about an hour of searching, they spied a moving squiggle. It was a living I. plenipes. Marek says he was so excited that he was probably close to hyperventilating. Over several more visits, the brothers and a colleague collected 12 millipedes (leaving at least as many behind). The adults had between 318 and 666 legs. There are more than 1,000 species of millipedes worldwide. Distantly related to lobsters and shrimp, these animals have four legs per body segment. They don't bite, sting, or carry diseases. Luckily for many other creatures, they spend a lot of time eating dead leaves and recycling the nutrients into the soil. In contrast, centipedes have two legs per body segment, and some have a dangerous bite. I. plenipes was first observed in 1926 by a scientist who was one of the pioneers of millipede studies in North America. Later, when other specialists scoured the same small area in California looking for these millipedes, they came back empty-handed. Part of the problem is that the leggy creatures are hard to see. Despite their many legs, adults measure less than 3.4 centimeters (1.3 inches) long and about half a millimeter (0.02 inch) wide. "It's pretty hard to immediately tell the difference between this tiny threadlike thing and a [plant] root hair," says millipede expert Paul Marek of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. Last year, Marek and his brother visited the area where I. plenipes had originally been found. They came around Thanksgiving during the rainy season, when millipedes, which like wet conditions, are more likely to crawl from their underground lairs to the surface. After about an hour of searching, they spied a moving squiggle. It was a living I. plenipes. Marek says he was so excited that he was probably close to hyperventilating. Over several more visits, the brothers and a colleague collected 12 millipedes (leaving at least as many behind). The adults had between 318 and 666 legs. There are more than 1,000 species of millipedes worldwide. Distantly related to lobsters and shrimp, these animals have four legs per body segment. They don't bite, sting, or carry diseases. Luckily for many other creatures, they spend a lot of time eating dead leaves and recycling the nutrients into the soil. In contrast, centipedes have two legs per body segment, and some have a dangerous bite. I. plenipes was first observed in 1926 by a scientist who was one of the pioneers of millipede studies in North America. Later, when other specialists scoured the same small area in California looking for these millipedes, they came back empty-handed. Part of the problem is that the leggy creatures are hard to see. Despite their many legs, adults measure less than 3.4 centimeters (1.3 inches) long and about half a millimeter (0.02 inch) wide. "It's pretty hard to immediately tell the difference between this tiny threadlike thing and a [plant] root hair," says millipede expert Paul Marek of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. Last year, Marek and his brother visited the area where I. plenipes had originally been found. They came around Thanksgiving during the rainy season, when millipedes, which like wet conditions, are more likely to crawl from their underground lairs to the surface. After about an hour of searching, they spied a moving squiggle. It was a living I. plenipes. Marek says he was so excited that he was probably close to hyperventilating. Over several more visits, the brothers and a colleague collected 12 millipedes (leaving at least as many behind). The adults had between 318 and 666 legs. There are more than 1,000 species of millipedes worldwide. Distantly related to lobsters and shrimp, these animals have four legs per body segment. They don't bite, sting, or carry diseases. Luckily for many other creatures, they spend a lot of time eating dead leaves and recycling the nutrients into the soil. In contrast, centipedes have two legs per body segment, and some have a dangerous bite. I. plenipes was first observed in 1926 by a scientist who was one of the pioneers of millipede studies in North America. Later, when other specialists scoured the same small area in California looking for these millipedes, they came back empty-handed. Part of the problem is that the leggy creatures are hard to see. Despite their many legs, adults measure less than 3.4 centimeters (1.3 inches) long and about half a millimeter (0.02 inch) wide. "It's pretty hard to immediately tell the difference between this tiny threadlike thing and a [plant] root hair," says millipede expert Paul Marek of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. Last year, Marek and his brother visited the area where I. plenipes had originally been found. They came around Thanksgiving during the rainy season, when millipedes, which like wet conditions, are more likely to crawl from their underground lairs to the surface. After about an hour of searching, they spied a moving squiggle. It was a living I. plenipes. Marek says he was so excited that he was probably close to hyperventilating. Over several more visits, the brothers and a colleague collected 12 millipedes (leaving at least as many behind). The adults had between 318 and 666 legs. There are more than 1,000 species of millipedes worldwide. Distantly related to lobsters and shrimp, these animals have four legs per body segment. They don't bite, sting, or carry diseases. Luckily for many other creatures, they spend a lot of time eating dead leaves and recycling the nutrients into the soil. In contrast, centipedes have two legs per body segment, and some have a dangerous bite. I. plenipes was first observed in 1926 by a scientist who was one of the pioneers of millipede studies in North America. Later, when other specialists scoured the same small area in California looking for these millipedes, they came back empty-handed. Part of the problem is that the leggy creatures are hard to see. Despite their many legs, adults measure less than 3.4 centimeters (1.3 inches) long and about half a millimeter (0.02 inch) wide. "It's pretty hard to immediately tell the difference between this tiny threadlike thing and a [plant] root hair," says millipede expert Paul Marek of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. Last year, Marek and his brother visited the area where I. plenipes had originally been found. They came around Thanksgiving during the rainy season, when millipedes, which like wet conditions, are more likely to crawl from their underground lairs to the surface. After about an hour of searching, they spied a moving squiggle. It was a living I. plenipes. Marek says he was so excited that he was probably close to hyperventilating. Over several more visits, the brothers and a colleague collected 12 millipedes (leaving at least as many behind). The adults had between 318 and 666 legs. There are more than 1,000 species of millipedes worldwide. Distantly related to lobsters and shrimp, these animals have four legs per body segment. They don't bite, sting, or carry diseases. Luckily for many other creatures, they spend a lot of time eating dead leaves and recycling the nutrients into the soil. In contrast, centipedes have two legs per body segment, and some have a dangerous bite. I. plenipes was first observed in 1926 by a scientist who was one of the pioneers of millipede studies in North America. Later, when other specialists scoured the same small area in California looking for these millipedes, they came back empty-handed. Part of the problem is that the leggy creatures are hard to see. Despite their many legs, adults measure less than 3.4 centimeters (1.3 inches) long and about half a millimeter (0.02 inch) wide. "It's pretty hard to immediately tell the difference between this tiny threadlike thing and a [plant] root hair," says millipede expert Paul Marek of East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C. Last year, Marek and his brother visited the area where I. plenipes had originally been found. They came around Thanksgiving during the rainy season, when millipedes, which like wet conditions, are more likely to crawl from their underground lairs to the surface. After about an hour of searching, they spied a moving squiggle. It was a living I. plenipes. Marek says he was so excited that he was probably close to hyperventilating. Over several more visits, the brothers and a colleague collected 12 millipedes (leaving at least as many behind). The adults had between 318 and 666 legs. Females usually have more legs than males do, Marek says, and the millipedes probably grow additional legs as they get older. The rediscovery of I. plenipes is wonderful news, says millipede expert Robert Mesibov of the Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery in Launceston, Tasmania. The island of Tasmania by itself has more than 160 millipede species. It's striking that I. plenipes appears to live within just one 0.8-square-kilometer patch of land. "If we're serious about conserving biodiversity," Mesibov says, "we need to pay attention to tiny natural areas." Th

Spotting the World's Leggiest Animal
Spotting the World's Leggiest Animal








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™