Agriculture
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Got Milk? How?
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Bullfrogs
Salamanders
Animals
Awake at Night
Jay Watch
The History of Meow
Behavior
Math Naturals
Fear Matters
The case of the headless ant
Birds
Emus
Mockingbirds
Carnivorous Birds
Chemistry and Materials
Atom Hauler
Pencil Thin
The chemistry of sleeplessness
Computers
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Hubble trouble doubled
Galaxies on the go
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino Babies
Mini T. rex
Supersight for a Dino King
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Riding to Earth's Core
On the Trail of America's Next Top Scientists
Life under Ice
Environment
When Fungi and Algae Marry
A Newspaper's Hidden Cost
Power of the Wind
Finding the Past
Stonehenge Settlement
Oldest Writing in the New World
The Puzzle of Ancient Mariners
Fish
Parrotfish
Puffer Fish
Lampreys
Food and Nutrition
Eat Out, Eat Smart
Recipe for Health
Food for Life
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Math of the World
Math is a real brain bender
Human Body
Sea Kids See Clearly Underwater
Gut Microbes and Weight
Don't Eat That Sandwich!
Invertebrates
Crabs
Cockroaches
Daddy Long Legs
Mammals
Miscellaneous Mammals
Chipmunks
Sheep
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
How children learn
Physics
Invisibility Ring
Powering Ball Lightning
Black Hole Journey
Plants
Assembling the Tree of Life
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
A Giant Flower's New Family
Reptiles
Crocodilians
Sea Turtles
Copperhead Snakes
Space and Astronomy
An Icy Blob of Fluff
Older Stars, New Age for the Universe
Melting Snow on Mars
Technology and Engineering
Crime Lab
A Satellite of Your Own
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
What is a Preposition?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Charged cars that would charge
Robots on a Rocky Road
How to Fly Like a Bat
Weather
A Dire Shortage of Water
Earth's Poles in Peril
Arctic Melt
Add your Article

Sponges' secret weapon

Bacteria are tiny, single-celled organisms that can cause disease in humans through infection. Bacteria can live almost anywhere: in soil, water, food or your body. We can cure many types of bacterial infections with the use of medicine called antibiotics, which kill the germy organisms. Unfortunately, some types of bacteria do not respond to antibiotics. This resistance can be a big problem for humans — if our antibiotics don’t kill the bacteria, then a bacterial infection can be deadly. Some bacteria that cause ear infections, food poisoning and whooping cough, for example, can resist antibiotics. Scientists recently discovered a new way to fight these tough bacteria. And it was in a very unusual place: under the sea. Peter Moeller, a chemist at the Hollings Marine Laboratory in Charleston, S.C., and his team found a place on the ocean floor where all the organisms were dead — except for a sponge. Sponges are simple aquatic animals, many of which look like tubes. (Historically, humans have used dead sponges for scrubbing and cleaning, but most modern sponges — like the one by your kitchen sink — are made from synthetic, or man-made, materials.) “How is this thing surviving when everything else is dead?” Moeller asked about the lone sponge. He knew that the sea is like a playground for disease — ocean water is literally swimming with bacteria. In the body of the sponge, the scientists found a chemical called ageliferin. That chemical, which is nontoxic, might make it possible to fight against bacteria that don’t respond to antibiotics. When the scientists put ageliferin on some particularly tough bacteria in the laboratory and then added antibiotics, the germy organisms died. Ageliferin’s power to resist bacteria can help explain why the sponge is able to survive in a place where other organisms cannot. In February, Moeller announced that ageliferin might be used against bacteria that threaten humans. In the laboratory, he has found that ageliferin can boost the power of antibiotics against bacteria that cause whooping cough, ear infections and food poisoning. It might also be used to fight bacterial infections that occur among wounded soldiers. That news is promising. But right now, ageliferin works only in the laboratory. The scientists don’t know how ageliferin works, and they don’t know if it will ever really help humans fight back against bacteria. Nonetheless, it works for sponges — and it just may work for us.

Sponges' secret weapon
Sponges' secret weapon








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™