Agriculture
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Making the most of a meal
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Tree Frogs
Newts
Animals
Bee Heat Cooks Invaders
Tool Use Comes Naturally to Crows
Hot Pepper, Hot Spider
Behavior
Making light of sleep
Contemplating thought
Eating Troubles
Birds
Cranes
Cassowaries
Turkeys
Chemistry and Materials
Batteries built by Viruses
Unscrambling a Gem of a Mystery
Salt secrets
Computers
New eyes to scan the skies
Programming with Alice
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Message in a dinosaur's teeth
A Rainforest Trapped in Amber
Tiny Pterodactyl
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Explorer of the Extreme Deep
Earth's Lowly Rumble
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Environment
The Oily Gulf
Giant snakes invading North America
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Finding the Past
A Big Discovery about Little People
Sahara Cemetery
Fakes in the museum
Fish
Mahi-Mahi
Goldfish
Electric Eel
Food and Nutrition
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
Making good, brown fat
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Whoever vs. Whomever
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
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GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Human Body
Dreaming makes perfect
A New Touch
Germ Zapper
Invertebrates
Dragonflies
Praying Mantis
Corals
Mammals
Quokkas
Miniature Schnauzers
Vampire Bats
Parents
Children and Media
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
How children learn
Physics
The Particle Zoo
Dreams of Floating in Space
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Plants
Flower family knows its roots
Springing forward
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Reptiles
Cobras
Sea Turtles
Reptiles
Space and Astronomy
Catching a Comet's Tail
Sun Flips Out to Flip-Flop
Baby Star
Technology and Engineering
Bionic Bacteria
Musclebots Take Some Steps
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
Pronouns
What is a Noun
Transportation
Reach for the Sky
Charged cars that would charge
Middle school science adventures
Weather
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
Catching Some Rays
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
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Songbirds

Listen outside in any season, at almost any time of day, and you'll hear them: songbirds. Although most birds make some kind of noise, songbirds put on a particularly brilliant show, using their voices to produce pleasing whistles, chirps, and melodies to challenge one another, attract a mate, or communicate with other members of their species. Bird songs between species are so unique that birdwatchers can identify species just by the song they're singing. A songbird is a bird belonging to the suborder Oscines of Passeriformes (ca. 4000 species), in which the vocal organ is developed in such a way as to produce various sound notes, commonly known as bird song. Songbirds evolved about 50 million years ago in the western part of Gondwana that later became Australia, New Zealand and Antarctica and later spread around the world. This 'bird song' is essentially territorial in that it communicates the identity and whereabouts of an individual to other birds and also signals sexual intentions. It is not to be confused with bird calls which are used for alarms and contact, and are especially important in birds that feed or migrate in flocks. Other birds have songs to attract mates or hold territory, but these are usually simple and repetitive, lacking the variety of many passerine songs. The monotonous repetition of the Common Cuckoo or Little Crake can be contrasted with the variety of a Nightingale or Marsh Warbler. Although many songbirds have songs which are pleasant to the human ear, this is not invariably the case. Many members of the crow family make croaks or screeches which sound harsh to humans

Songbirds
Songbirds








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