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Springing forward
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Frogs and Toads
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Poor Devils
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World’s largest lizard is venomous too
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Lighting goes digital
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The Book of Life
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Galaxies far, far, far away
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Meet the new dinos
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Meteorites may have sparked life on Earth
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Warmest Year on Record
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The Oily Gulf
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Deep-space dancers
Prime Time for Cicadas
Human Body
From Stem Cell to Any Cell
A Fix for Injured Knees
Opening a Channel for Tasting Salt
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Dingoes
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Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
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Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Powering Ball Lightning
Dreams of Floating in Space
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Flower family knows its roots
Farms sprout in cities
Surprise Visitor
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Box Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Chaos Among the Planets
Slip-sliding away
Tossing Out a Black Hole Life Preserver
Technology and Engineering
A Satellite of Your Own
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
Slip Sliming Away
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Noun
Transportation
Robots on the Road, Again
Middle school science adventures
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Weather
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
A Dire Shortage of Water
Where rivers run uphill
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Songbirds

Listen outside in any season, at almost any time of day, and you'll hear them: songbirds. Although most birds make some kind of noise, songbirds put on a particularly brilliant show, using their voices to produce pleasing whistles, chirps, and melodies to challenge one another, attract a mate, or communicate with other members of their species. Bird songs between species are so unique that birdwatchers can identify species just by the song they're singing. A songbird is a bird belonging to the suborder Oscines of Passeriformes (ca. 4000 species), in which the vocal organ is developed in such a way as to produce various sound notes, commonly known as bird song. Songbirds evolved about 50 million years ago in the western part of Gondwana that later became Australia, New Zealand and Antarctica and later spread around the world. This 'bird song' is essentially territorial in that it communicates the identity and whereabouts of an individual to other birds and also signals sexual intentions. It is not to be confused with bird calls which are used for alarms and contact, and are especially important in birds that feed or migrate in flocks. Other birds have songs to attract mates or hold territory, but these are usually simple and repetitive, lacking the variety of many passerine songs. The monotonous repetition of the Common Cuckoo or Little Crake can be contrasted with the variety of a Nightingale or Marsh Warbler. Although many songbirds have songs which are pleasant to the human ear, this is not invariably the case. Many members of the crow family make croaks or screeches which sound harsh to humans

Songbirds
Songbirds








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