Agriculture
Getting the dirt on carbon
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Toads
Bullfrogs
Animals
Chicken Talk
Lucky Survival for Black Cats
Little Bee Brains That Could
Behavior
Calculating crime
Monkeys in the Mirror
The (kids') eyes have it
Birds
Tropical Birds
Pelicans
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Chemistry and Materials
Nanomagnets Corral Oil
Unscrambling a Gem of a Mystery
The chemistry of sleeplessness
Computers
Galaxies on the go
It's a Small E-mail World After All
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino Babies
Message in a dinosaur's teeth
Meet your mysterious relative
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
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Earth
Life trapped under a glacier
Unnatural Disasters
Earth from the inside out
Environment
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
Pollution Detective
Blooming Jellies
Finding the Past
Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist
Untangling Human Origins
Ancient Art on the Rocks
Fish
Angler Fish
Nurse Sharks
Saltwater Fish
Food and Nutrition
Packing Fat
How Super Are Superfruits?
Symbols from the Stone Age
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Capitalization Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
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Tarrant High overcoming the odds
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GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
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GSAT Mathematics
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Monkeys Count
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Human Body
The tell-tale bacteria
A Sour Taste in Your Mouth
What the appendix is good for
Invertebrates
Millipedes
Jellyfish
Flies
Mammals
Blue Bear
Squirrels
African Warthogs
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
Project Music
One ring around them all
Gaining a Swift Lift
Plants
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Underwater Jungles
A Change in Leaf Color
Reptiles
Alligators
Komodo Dragons
Snapping Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Killers from Outer Space
Return to Space
An Icy Blob of Fluff
Technology and Engineering
Shape Shifting
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Pronouns
What is a Noun
Transportation
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
How to Fly Like a Bat
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Weather
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Earth's Poles in Peril
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Songbirds

Listen outside in any season, at almost any time of day, and you'll hear them: songbirds. Although most birds make some kind of noise, songbirds put on a particularly brilliant show, using their voices to produce pleasing whistles, chirps, and melodies to challenge one another, attract a mate, or communicate with other members of their species. Bird songs between species are so unique that birdwatchers can identify species just by the song they're singing. A songbird is a bird belonging to the suborder Oscines of Passeriformes (ca. 4000 species), in which the vocal organ is developed in such a way as to produce various sound notes, commonly known as bird song. Songbirds evolved about 50 million years ago in the western part of Gondwana that later became Australia, New Zealand and Antarctica and later spread around the world. This 'bird song' is essentially territorial in that it communicates the identity and whereabouts of an individual to other birds and also signals sexual intentions. It is not to be confused with bird calls which are used for alarms and contact, and are especially important in birds that feed or migrate in flocks. Other birds have songs to attract mates or hold territory, but these are usually simple and repetitive, lacking the variety of many passerine songs. The monotonous repetition of the Common Cuckoo or Little Crake can be contrasted with the variety of a Nightingale or Marsh Warbler. Although many songbirds have songs which are pleasant to the human ear, this is not invariably the case. Many members of the crow family make croaks or screeches which sound harsh to humans

Songbirds
Songbirds








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