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Got Milk? How?
Silk’s superpowers
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Toads
Salamanders
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Fishing for Giant Squid
Return of the Lost Limbs
Cannibal Crickets
Behavior
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Monkeys in the Mirror
Diving, Rolling, and Floating, Alligator Style
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Ibises
Swans
Nightingales
Chemistry and Materials
Mother-of-Pearl on Ice
A Light Delay
Cold, colder and coldest ice
Computers
Nonstop Robot
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Games with a Purpose
Dinosaurs and Fossils
An Ancient Spider's Web
From Mammoth to Modern Elephant
Have shell, will travel
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
The Rise of Yellowstone
Farms sprout in cities
Earth from the inside out
Environment
Out in the Cold
Bald Eagles Forever
Food Web Woes
Finding the Past
An Ancient Childhood
Settling the Americas
Childhood's Long History
Fish
Pygmy Sharks
Flounder
Skates and Rays
Food and Nutrition
How Super Are Superfruits?
Recipe for Health
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Who vs. That vs. Which
Subject and Verb Agreement
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Exam Preparation
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
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Human Body
Remembering Facts and Feelings
Sun Screen
Sea Kids See Clearly Underwater
Invertebrates
Insects
Butterflies
Scorpions
Mammals
Yaks
Squirrels
Miniature Schnauzers
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Black Hole Journey
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Plants
Bright Blooms That Glow
A Giant Flower's New Family
Making the most of a meal
Reptiles
Asp
Iguanas
Box Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Intruder Alert: Sweeping Space for Dust
A Planet's Slim-Fast Plan
Icy Red Planet
Technology and Engineering
Crime Lab
Toy Challenge
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Noun
Transportation
Flying the Hyper Skies
Where rivers run uphill
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Weather
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Either Martians or Mars has gas
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
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Songbirds

Listen outside in any season, at almost any time of day, and you'll hear them: songbirds. Although most birds make some kind of noise, songbirds put on a particularly brilliant show, using their voices to produce pleasing whistles, chirps, and melodies to challenge one another, attract a mate, or communicate with other members of their species. Bird songs between species are so unique that birdwatchers can identify species just by the song they're singing. A songbird is a bird belonging to the suborder Oscines of Passeriformes (ca. 4000 species), in which the vocal organ is developed in such a way as to produce various sound notes, commonly known as bird song. Songbirds evolved about 50 million years ago in the western part of Gondwana that later became Australia, New Zealand and Antarctica and later spread around the world. This 'bird song' is essentially territorial in that it communicates the identity and whereabouts of an individual to other birds and also signals sexual intentions. It is not to be confused with bird calls which are used for alarms and contact, and are especially important in birds that feed or migrate in flocks. Other birds have songs to attract mates or hold territory, but these are usually simple and repetitive, lacking the variety of many passerine songs. The monotonous repetition of the Common Cuckoo or Little Crake can be contrasted with the variety of a Nightingale or Marsh Warbler. Although many songbirds have songs which are pleasant to the human ear, this is not invariably the case. Many members of the crow family make croaks or screeches which sound harsh to humans

Songbirds
Songbirds








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