Agriculture
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Springing forward
Fast-flying fungal spores
Amphibians
Newts
Salamanders
Tree Frogs
Animals
Life on the Down Low
Sleep Affects a Bird's Singing
Fishy Sounds
Behavior
The Disappearing Newspaper
Bringing fish back up to size
Storing Memories before Bedtime
Birds
Doves
Quails
Flamingos
Chemistry and Materials
Flytrap Machine
The chemistry of sleeplessness
Supergoo to the rescue
Computers
A Light Delay
Lighting goes digital
Fingerprint Evidence
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Teeny Skull Reveals Ancient Ancestor
Dinosaur Eggs-citement
Watery Fate for Nature's Gliders
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Pollution at the ends of the Earth
Slip Slidin' Away—Under the Sea
Snowflakes and Avalanches
Environment
Lessons from a Lonely Tortoise
Little Bits of Trouble
A Newspaper's Hidden Cost
Finding the Past
Watching deep-space fireworks
Oldest Writing in the New World
An Ancient Childhood
Fish
Sharks
Saltwater Fish
Goldfish
Food and Nutrition
Yummy bugs
Recipe for Health
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Adjectives and Adverbs
Pronouns
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Math is a real brain bender
Human Body
Dreaming makes perfect
From Stem Cell to Any Cell
Disease Detectives
Invertebrates
Scorpions
Daddy Long Legs
Millipedes
Mammals
Giant Panda
Porcupines
Gazelle
Parents
How children learn
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Powering Ball Lightning
Project Music
Plants
The algae invasion
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Sweet, Sticky Science
Reptiles
Lizards
Boa Constrictors
Pythons
Space and Astronomy
Big Galaxy Swallows Little Galaxy
An Icy Blob of Fluff
Saturn's New Moons
Technology and Engineering
Reach for the Sky
Beyond Bar Codes
Searching for Alien Life
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
What is a Preposition?
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Robots on a Rocky Road
Where rivers run uphill
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Weather
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Where rivers run uphill
Catching Some Rays
Add your Article

Some Dinos Dined on Grass

When dinosaur poop is preserved, it's like a time capsule. The fossilized lumps contain clues about what the reptiles were eating long ago. Recent analyses of fossilized dino droppings unearthed in India have turned up at least five types of grasses. The discovery is thrilling to paleontologists because it's the first evidence that some dinosaurs actually ate grass. The remains also suggest that grass had evolved into different types much earlier than scientists had thought. Titanosaurs probably produced the fossilized poop pellets 65 million years ago. Each piece of fossilized dung, called a coprolite, was shaped like a sphere and measured up to 10 centimeters (4 inches) across. When the researchers looked closely at the coprolites, they were able to identify tiny fragments of glass called phytoliths. These little bits of silica form inside the cells of many plants, and they are especially common in grasses. Each type of grass produces its own uniquely shaped phytolith. So, by analyzing phytoliths left behind in the dino excrement, the scientists were able to identify a variety of grasses that had passed through the digestive tracts of the animals. They also found evidence of other plants, including palm trees, conifers, and cycads. Until now, the earliest known fossils of grass leaves and stems dated back just 56 million years. The new find pushes the date when grasses were flourishing back at least 9 million years, probably more. The research could "completely revise what we've thought about the origin of grasses," says Elizabeth A. Kellogg. She's an evolutionary biologist at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. "This isn't that much older than the oldest previous grass fossils, but to find such diversity at that time is surprising." Other evidence suggests grasses could have first appeared as far back as 80 million years ago. Knowing that grasses arose so early might help explain a long-standing animal mystery. Just before the dinosaurs died out about 65 million years ago, mammals called gondwanatheres appeared on Earth. Gondwanatheres were as big as groundhogs with long, flat teeth. Their teeth were similar to those of horses and other modern grass-eaters. Scientists have been puzzling about what these animals ate. Now they know that it might have been grass.—E. Sohn

Some Dinos Dined on Grass
Some Dinos Dined on Grass








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™