Agriculture
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Springing forward
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Amphibians
Toads
Newts
Frogs and Toads
Animals
Ant Invasions Change the Rules
Polar Bears in Trouble
Tool Use Comes Naturally to Crows
Behavior
Sugar-pill medicine
The Science Fair Circuit
Brain cells take a break
Birds
Cardinals
Birds We Eat
Parrots
Chemistry and Materials
A Butterfly's Electric Glow
A Light Delay
Revving Up Green Machines
Computers
It's a Small E-mail World After All
A New Look at Saturn's rings
Electronic Paper Turns a Page
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Tiny Pterodactyl
A Living Fossil
Winged Insects May Go Way Back
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Drilling Deep for Fuel
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Island of Hope
Environment
The Birds are Falling
Acid Snails
What is groundwater
Finding the Past
A Plankhouse Past
Words of the Distant Past
Stone Age Sole Survivors
Fish
Salmon
Tiger Sharks
Skates and Rays
Food and Nutrition
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
Recipe for Health
The Essence of Celery
GSAT English Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Order of Adjectives
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
Play for Science
Detecting True Art
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Human Body
Teen Brains, Under Construction
A Better Flu Shot
Surviving Olympic Heat
Invertebrates
Fleas
Nautiluses
Dragonflies
Mammals
African Hyenas
Gray Whale
Oxen
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Dreams of Floating in Space
Invisibility Ring
Plants
Underwater Jungles
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Reptiles
Chameleons
Iguanas
Geckos
Space and Astronomy
Super Star Cluster in the Neighborhood
Holes in Martian moon mystery
Planets on the Edge
Technology and Engineering
Sugar Power for Cell Phones
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
Musclebots Take Some Steps
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Preposition?
Pronouns
Transportation
Revving Up Green Machines
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Robots on a Rocky Road
Weather
Earth's Poles in Peril
Watering the Air
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
Add your Article

Solving a Sedna Mystery

Orbiting beyond Pluto, a planetoid called Sedna has aroused plenty of curiosity—and created some confusion—since its discovery last year. It's the most-remote object known in the solar system. Astronomers have been especially frustrated by their inability to find a moon around the distant object. The first observations had suggested that there ought to be one. These observations appeared to show that Sedna spins very slowly, just once every 20 days. Only the tug of a little moon could explain this lazy spin rate. Images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, however, failed to turn up a moon. Now, researchers from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass., say they have solved the puzzle. New measurements show that Sedna doesn't spin so slowly after all. Using a highly sensitive telescope on Mount Hopkins in Arizona, the astronomers measured periods of brightness and darkness on Sedna. The results showed that the planetoid spins some 50 times faster than previous estimates had suggested. Elsewhere, researchers turned up other interesting news about Sedna. Contrary to earlier assumptions, they found that Sedna doesn't appear to have any ice on its surface. That's strange because it's very cold so far away from the sun. And Pluto, which is closer to the sun, has lots of ice on it. So does Pluto's moon, Charon. The explanation for this mystery, the scientists suggest, is that Sedna used to have an icy surface. However, constant bombardment by cosmic rays and the sun's ultraviolet light produced a dark coating instead. Because Pluto and Charon orbit closer to the sun than Sedna, they might encounter more debris than Sedna does. Frequent collisions with this debris could then either prevent a dark coating from forming or deliver fresh ice to their surfaces.—E. Sohn

Solving a Sedna Mystery
Solving a Sedna Mystery








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™