Agriculture
Getting the dirt on carbon
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Middle school science adventures
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Bullfrogs
Frogs and Toads
Animals
Missing Moose
The Secret Lives of Grizzlies
A Meal Plan for Birds
Behavior
A Recipe for Happiness
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
How Much Babies Know
Birds
Chicken
Carnivorous Birds
Quails
Chemistry and Materials
Music of the Future
The Buzz about Caffeine
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
Computers
The Book of Life
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
The science of disappearing
Dinosaurs and Fossils
The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs
Hunting by Sucking, Long Ago
Dinosaur Eggs-citement
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
A Volcano Wakes Up
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
Snowflakes and Avalanches
Environment
Missing Tigers in India
Plant Gas
Will Climate Change Depose Monarchs?
Finding the Past
Oldest Writing in the New World
Ancient Art on the Rocks
Unearthing Ancient Astronomy
Fish
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Seahorses
Flashlight Fishes
Food and Nutrition
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
Packing Fat
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Order of Adjectives
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Scholarship
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Setting a Prime Number Record
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Human Body
Workouts: Does Stretching Help?
Dreaming makes perfect
Prime Time for Broken Bones
Invertebrates
Shrimps
Scallops
Cockroaches
Mammals
Horses
Yaks
African Elephants
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
How children learn
Physics
Gaining a Swift Lift
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
IceCube Science
Plants
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Assembling the Tree of Life
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
Reptiles
Alligators
Turtles
Cobras
Space and Astronomy
Holes in Martian moon mystery
A Dusty Birthplace
Phantom Energy and the Big Rip
Technology and Engineering
Sugar Power for Cell Phones
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Noun
Transportation
Ready, unplug, drive
How to Fly Like a Bat
Robots on a Rocky Road
Weather
Recipe for a Hurricane
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Add your Article

Smelly Traps for Lampreys

Sea lampreys might be nobody's best friend. The snakelike fish are parasites. They latch onto other fish and suck their blood. Sea lampreys are also invaders. About a century ago, they arrived in the Great Lakes. By the 1940s, they had nearly wiped out many populations of native fish. Since then, the Great Lakes Fishery Commission has spent many millions of dollars on attempts to control lampreys in the Great Lakes. The fish are a hearty bunch. Now, scientists from the University of Minnesota have found a new way to keep the destructive creatures at bay. They're tapping into a lamprey's sense of smell.As larvae, sea lampreys spend up to 20 years in freshwater streams, where they eat and grow. Then, nearing adulthood, they move to a larger body of water, where they feed off one fish after another, for about a year. Finally, they swim to streams to mate. After a few weeks of breeding and laying eggs, they die. Scientists have long suspected that lampreys follow the scent of each other's pheromones, or body chemicals, to find suitable streams for mating. To sort out which particular chemicals attract lampreys, the University of Minnesota researchers began with 8,000 liters (210 gallons) of water that had contained about 35,000 baby lamprey larvae. The scientists concentrated the liquid until they had just a few grams of gunk. They separated the gunk into individual chemical components, or compounds. Then, they tested each compound to see how lampreys responded to it. The study turned up three compounds that both affected the lamprey's sense of smell and attracted the fish. It was the first time that scientists have identified pheromones that affect migration in any vertebrate (animal with a backbone). After the researchers figured out which chemicals matter, they were able to create one of the compounds in the lab. If they can find a way to make the compound in large quantities, the scientists hope they'll be able to use it to attract lampreys away from their breeding grounds. This would prevent the lampreys from reproducing, which would reduce their numbers and their impact. Mimicking the lamprey's scent could be a cheap and efficient way to reclaim the Great Lakes from a pesky parasite.E. Sohn

Smelly Traps for Lampreys
Smelly Traps for Lampreys








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™