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Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
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Hungry bug seeks hot meal
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Big Squid
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Scientist Profile: Wally Gilbert
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A Light Delay
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Dino-bite!
A Really Big (but Extinct) Rodent
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
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Snowflakes and Avalanches
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If Only Bones Could Speak
Ancient Art on the Rocks
Untangling Human Origins
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A Taste for Cheese
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Who vs. That vs. Which
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Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
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Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
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Play for Science
Monkeys Count
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
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Speedy Gene Gives Runners a Boost
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Horseshoe Crabs
Daddy Long Legs
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Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
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Gaining a Swift Lift
Einstein's Skateboard
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Plants
Nature's Alphabet
Getting the dirt on carbon
Seeds of the Future
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Rover Makes Splash on Mars
Sun Flips Out to Flip-Flop
Icy Red Planet
Technology and Engineering
Supersuits for Superheroes
Riding Sunlight
A Satellite of Your Own
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
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Transportation
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Ready, unplug, drive
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Weather
Watering the Air
Warmest Year on Record
Either Martians or Mars has gas
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Slip Slidin' Away—Under the Sea

Norwegian scientists have used computers to help solve the puzzle. They figure that undersea avalanches travel far and fast because the moving sediment rides on a thin layer of water trapped between the sediment and the seafloor. This water layer cuts down the friction, letting the sediment keep sliding for long distances, sometimes at high speed. Anders Elverhøi of the University of Oslo and his coworkers described their results in this month's Journal of Geophysical Research—Oceans. Something similar can happen to cars and trucks in wet weather. When traveling along a wet road, a car can lose its grip on the asphalt—making the car go into an uncontrollable slide. This loss of traction is known as "hydroplaning." It's caused by a layer of water between the tire and the road. Hydroplaning might explain the size and reach of a massive avalanche known as the Storegga slide. It took place in the Norwegian Sea about 8,000 years ago. Enough sediment to make up several mountains broke free in that avalanche, and some of slid nearly 500 kilometers. It can take much longer for debris to settle when an avalanche happens beneath the ocean. Underwater landslides can keep going and going—even along surfaces that are nearly flat. These huge, rolling masses of clay and silt sometimes wipe out plant and animal life over vast areas of the seafloor. What keeps ocean avalanches on the move? And, in a 1929 slide just south of Newfoundland, 300 to 700 cubic kilometers of sediment sped across the seafloor at nearly 80 kilometers per hour, snapping several transatlantic communication cables. Crabs, shrimp, and Nemo, get out of the way! Once an underwater landslide gets going, there's no stopping it until it's moved a long, long way.—S. McDonagh

Slip Slidin' Away—Under the Sea
Slip Slidin' Away—Under the Sea








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