Agriculture
Getting the dirt on carbon
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Watching out for vultures
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Salamanders
Newts
Animals
G-Tunes with a Message
Staying Away from Sick Lobsters
Ultrasonic Frogs Raise the Pitch
Behavior
Meet your mysterious relative
Taking a Spill for Science
Listening to Birdsong
Birds
Ibises
Backyard Birds
Flamingos
Chemistry and Materials
The hottest soup in New York
A Framework for Growing Bone
Atom Hauler
Computers
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
A Classroom of the Mind
Fingerprint Evidence
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino-Dining Dinosaurs
Message in a dinosaur's teeth
Fingerprinting Fossils
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Distant Quake Changes Geyser Eruptions
Undersea Vent System Active for Ages
Rocking the House
Environment
Little Bits of Trouble
Bald Eagles Forever
Shrinking Fish
Finding the Past
Childhood's Long History
A Plankhouse Past
Ancient Art on the Rocks
Fish
Tiger Sharks
Goldfish
Basking Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Symbols from the Stone Age
A Taste for Cheese
Healing Honey
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Subject and Verb Agreement
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Exam Preparation
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Scholarship
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Play for Science
Human Body
Fighting Off Micro-Invader Epidemics
Cell Phone Tattlers
Sleeping Soundly for a Longer Life
Invertebrates
Clams
Tapeworms
Cockroaches
Mammals
Deers
Chinchillas
African Hyenas
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Powering Ball Lightning
Project Music
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Plants
Fast-flying fungal spores
Nature's Alphabet
Sweet, Sticky Science
Reptiles
Geckos
Copperhead Snakes
Black Mamba
Space and Astronomy
Intruder Alert: Sweeping Space for Dust
Wrong-way planets do gymnastics
The two faces of Mars
Technology and Engineering
Toy Challenge
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Charged cars that would charge
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Troubles with Hubble
Weather
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
Recipe for a Hurricane
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Add your Article

Setting a Prime Number Record

What's the biggest number you can think of? A billion? A trillion? A googol? (That's 1 followed by 100 zeroes.) Whatever number you come up with, there's always a larger one.. You could write down 1 and keep adding zeroes after it until you hand gets tired, and you still wouldn't get to the "last" number. There's always another number right after whatever you've written down. Just add 1 and you'll get a bigger number. Certain types of numbers, though, are special. A computer search has now turned up the largest example yet found of a type known as prime numbers. The new champion is 7,816,230 digits long. If you could write 10 digits per second, it would take you more than 9 days to copy out the entire number! There are lots of different kinds of numbers and lots of ways to play with these numbers. You may have learned about whole numbers, fractions, integers, or even imaginary numbers. And you've probably done plenty of adding and subtracting, multiplying and dividing. For most people, math is just a useful set of skills that helps them count, make change, or cut cakes and pizzas into pieces of the right size or shape. For mathematicians and others, however, there's something magical about numbers, especially those that fall into the category of prime numbers. Prime numbers are whole numbers that can be divided evenly only by themselves and 1. One example of a prime number is 13. Only the numbers 1 and 13 divide into 13 without leaving a remainder. The number 8 is not a prime because it's divisible by 1, 2, 4, and 8—not just 1 and 8. The first few prime numbers are 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, and 29. It can be really hard to tell whether a number is a prime, especially if it's a huge number. It's easy to check whether 13 is a prime, for example. Just divide all the numbers that come before it into 13 and make sure that none divide into 13 evenly. For a big number, even with all sorts of shortcuts that mathematicians have found over the years for doing this, it takes much, much longer to find out. The new champion prime was found by a computer. As part of the Great Internet Mersenne Prime Search (GIMPS), people all over the world have donated computer time to search for primes. More than 250,000 computers are now involved, each one looking for primes whenever someone isn't using the computer for anything else. The record-breaking number turned up on an office computer owned by Martin Nowak, a German eye surgeon and a huge math fan. At 7,816,230 digits, it's some 500,000 digits longer than the previous record holder. The number can also be written as 2 to the 25,964,961st power minus 1. That's one less that 2 multiplied by itself 25,964,961 times. Try that on your calculator! Now, computers worldwide are looking for an even bigger prime. And there's no end in sight. There will always be a bigger one!—E. Sohn

Setting a Prime Number Record
Setting a Prime Number Record








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™