Agriculture
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Salamanders and Newts
Bullfrogs
Animals
A Microbe Nanny for Young Wasps
A Wild Ferret Rise
Poor Devils
Behavior
From dipping to fishing
Math is a real brain bender
Pollution at the ends of the Earth
Birds
Pheasants
Songbirds
Flightless Birds
Chemistry and Materials
Small but WISE
A Spider's Silky Strength
Silk’s superpowers
Computers
It's a Small E-mail World After All
Galaxies far, far, far away
The Earth-bound asteroid scientists saw coming
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Message in a dinosaur's teeth
The man who rocked biology to its core
Meet your mysterious relative
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Earth Rocks On
Explorer of the Extreme Deep
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Environment
Eating Up Foul Sewage Smells
Missing Tigers in India
Easy Ways to Conserve Water
Finding the Past
If Only Bones Could Speak
The Taming of the Cat
Settling the Americas
Fish
Flashlight Fishes
Electric Eel
Flounder
Food and Nutrition
Recipe for Health
Chocolate Rules
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
GSAT English Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Capitalization Rules
Pronouns
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Scholarship
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
Detecting True Art
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
Math of the World
Human Body
Foul Play?
Heart Revival
Kids now getting 'adult' disease
Invertebrates
Fleas
Termites
Clams
Mammals
Seal
Wolves
Chipmunks
Parents
How children learn
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Extra Strings for New Sounds
IceCube Science
Plants
A Change in Leaf Color
Getting the dirt on carbon
Seeds of the Future
Reptiles
Komodo Dragons
Sea Turtles
Snakes
Space and Astronomy
Pluto's New Moons
An Icy Blob of Fluff
A Puffy Planetary Puzzle
Technology and Engineering
Riding Sunlight
Slip Sliming Away
Musclebots Take Some Steps
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Adjectives and Adverbs
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Middle school science adventures
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Weather
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
Recipe for a Hurricane
Catching Some Rays
Add your Article

Seal

The true seals or earless seals are one of the three main groups of mammals within the seal suborder, Pinnipedia. All true seals are members of the family Phocidae. They are sometimes called crawling seals, to distinguish them from the fur seals and sea lions of family Otariidae. Phocids have no ears: Phocids are the more highly specialized for aquatic life of the two groups and, unlike otariids, lack external ears and cannot bring their hind flippers under their body to walk on them. Galumphing on land: They are more streamlined than fur seals and sea lions, and can therefore swim more effectively over long distances than those can. However, because they cannot turn their hind flippers downward, they are very clumsy on land, having to wiggle with their front flippers and abdominal muscles; this method of locomotion is called galumphing. Eared seals live more on the land: The eared seals (or walkinvg seals), family Otariidae, are the fur seals and the sea lions. These are barrel shaped marine mammals, adapted to a semi-aquatic lifestyle. They feed and travel in the water but breed and largely rest on land (or, in some cases, on ice). They are slightly less adapted to the aquatic lifestyle than are the true seals. True seals don't bark: Additionally, true seals do not communicate by "barking" like the fur seals and sea lions of family Otariidae. They communicate by slapping the water and grunting. Efficient, economical movement: While otariids are built for speed and maneuverability in the water, phocids are built for efficient, economical movement. This allows most phocids to make long foraging trips to exploit prey resources that are far from land, whereas otariids are tied to rich upwelling zones close to their breeding sites. Important fat reserves: The phocid reproductive cycle is characterized by temporal and spatial separation between feeding and maternal investment; in other words, a pregnant female spends a long period of time foraging at sea, building up her fat reserves, and then returns to the breeding site and uses her stored energy reserves to provide milk for her pup. It should be noted that the common seal (harbor seal in the U.S.), Phoca vitulina, does not separate foraging and maternal investment; instead, it displays a reptroductive strategy similar to those of otariids, in which the mother makes short foraging trips between nursing bouts. Lactate or eat: Because a phocid mother's feeding grounds are often hundreds of kilometers from the breeding site, this means that she must fast while she is lactating. This combination of fasting with lactation is one of the most unusual and extraordinary behaviors displayed by the Phocidae, because it requires the mother seal to provide large amounts of energy to her pup at a time when she herself is taking in no food (and often, no water) to replenish her stores. Thick, rich-fat milk: Because they must continue to burn fat reserves to supply their own metabolic needs while they are feeding their pups, phocid seals have developed an extremely thick, fat-rich milk that allows them to provide their pups with a large amount of energy in as small a period of time as possible. This allows the mother seal to maximize the efficiency of her energy transfer to the pup and then quickly return to sea to replenish her reserves. The length of lactation in phocids ranges from 28 days in the Northern Elephant Seal to just 3–5 days in the Hooded Seal. The nursing period is ended by the mother, who departs to sea and leaves her pup at the breeding site. Pups will continue to nurse if given the opportunity, and "milk stealers" that suckle from unrelated, sleeping females are not uncommon; this often results in the death of the pup whose mother the milk was stolen from, as any single female can only produce enough milk to provision one pup. Milk energy: Because the pup receives the milk energy from its mother so quickly, its development is typically not complete enough for it to begin foraging on its own as soon as the nursing period is complete. Seals, like all marine mammals, need time to develop the oxygen stores, swimming muscles and neural pathways necessary for effective diving and foraging. Because of this, most phocids undergo a postweaning fast, in which they remain on or near the breeding site and live off of the fat stores they acquired from their mothers until they are ready to begin foraging on their own. These pups typically eat no food and drink no water during the fast, although some polar species have been observed to eat snow. The postweaning fast ranges from 2 weeks in the Hooded Seal to 9-12 weeks in the Northern Elephant Seal. The physiological and behavioral adaptations that allow phocid pups to endure these remarkable fasts, which are among the longest for any mammal, remain an area of active study and research.

Seal
Seal








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™