Agriculture
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Got Milk? How?
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Toads
Bullfrogs
Animals
Hot Pepper, Hot Spider
Spotting the World's Leggiest Animal
Color-Changing Bugs
Behavior
Fear Matters
Lightening Your Mood
Swedish Rhapsody
Birds
Kiwis
Condors
Songbirds
Chemistry and Materials
Gooey Secrets of Mussel Power
Batteries built by Viruses
Popping to Perfection
Computers
Galaxies on the go
Middle school science adventures
A Classroom of the Mind
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Supersight for a Dino King
Did Dinosaurs Do Handstands?
Dino-bite!
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Arctic Algae Show Climate Change
Watering the Air
Slower Growth, Greater Warmth
Environment
Alien Invasions
Shrinking Fish
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Finding the Past
Fakes in the museum
Stone Tablet May Solve Maya Mystery
Words of the Distant Past
Fish
Angler Fish
Trout
White Tip Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
The mercury in that tuna
Making good, brown fat
GSAT English Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Who vs. Whom
Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Math of the World
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Human Body
Sun Screen
A New Touch
Running with Sneaker Science
Invertebrates
Daddy Long Legs
Arachnids
Lobsters
Mammals
Aardvarks
Boxers
Seal
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Gaining a Swift Lift
Powering Ball Lightning
Invisibility Ring
Plants
Fungus Hunt
Underwater Jungles
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Reptiles
Chameleons
Anacondas
Snakes
Space and Astronomy
Intruder Alert: Sweeping Space for Dust
Zooming In on the Wild Sun
An Earthlike Planet
Technology and Engineering
Riding Sunlight
Smart Windows
Slip Sliming Away
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
What is a Verb?
Pronouns
Transportation
How to Fly Like a Bat
Robots on the Road, Again
Revving Up Green Machines
Weather
Catching Some Rays
Arctic Melt
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Add your Article

Seagulls

Gulls are seabirds in the family Laridae. They are most closely related to the terns (family Sternidae), and more distantly to the waders, auks and skimmers. Most gulls belong to the large genus Larus. In common usage, members of various gull species are often called sea gulls or seagulls. This name is used by lay people to refer to a common local species or all gulls in general, and has no fixed taxonomic meaning. Gulls are, in general, medium to large birds, typically gray or white, often with black markings on the head or wings. They have stout, longish bills and webbed feet. Seagull Food: Most gulls, particularly Larus species, are ground nesting carnivores, which will take live food or scavenge opportunistically (often leading them to piles of garbage). The live food often includes crabs and small fish. Land Lovebirds: Apart from the kittiwakes, gulls are typically coastal or inland species, rarely venturing far out to sea. The large species take up to four years to attain full adult plumage,but two years is typical for small gulls. Ain't No Bird Brain: Gulls—the larger species in particular —are resourceful and highly intelligent birds, demonstrating complex methods of communication and a highly-developed social structure. Certain species (e.g. the Herring Gull) have exhibited tool use behavior. Many species of gull have learned to co-exist successfully with man and have thrived in human habitats. The Common Gull: The Common Gull, Larus canus is a medium-sized gull which breeds in the northwest of North America (where it is called Mew Gull), Europe and Asia. It migrates further south in winter. Classification Confusion: The Common Gull comprises three populations, sometimes considered distinct species: Larus canus canus, the Common Gull, of western Eurasia; L. c. kamschatschensis, the "Kamchatka Gull", of eastern Eurasia; and L. c. brachyrhynchus, the "Short-billed Gull", which breeds in Alaska and western Canada. The European race occurs as a scarce winter visitor to coastal eastern Canada and as a vagrant to the northeastern USA. To Tree, Or Not To Tree... This species breeds colonially near water or in marshes, making a lined nest on the ground or in a tree. Just the Facts: At 43cm in length and with a 120cm wingspan, it is considerably smaller than the Herring Gull. Adult Common Gulls are gray above and white below. Their legs are greenish. They have black wing-tips with large white "mirrors", particularly in American birds. Young birds have scaly black-brown upper parts and a neat wing pattern. They take three years to reach maturity. The call is a high-pitched "laughing" cry. Finders Keepers: These are omnivores like most Larus gulls, and they will scavenge as well as seeking suitable small prey. What's in a Name? Two terms are in common usage among gull enthusiasts for sub groupings of the gulls: Large white-headed gulls: 16 Herring Gull-like species from Great Black-backed Gull to Lesser Black-backed Gull White-winged gulls: The two Arctic-breeding species Iceland Gull and Glaucous Gull Love Has No Boundaries: Hybridization between species of gull occurs quite frequently, although to varying degrees depending on the species involved (see Hybridization in gulls). The taxonomy of the large white-headed gulls is particularly complicated.

Seagulls
Seagulls








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™