Agriculture
Middle school science adventures
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Amphibians
Newts
Poison Dart Frogs
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
Vent Worms Like It Hot
Chicken Talk
Clone Wars
Behavior
Slumber by the numbers
Calculating crime
Longer lives for wild elephants
Birds
Songbirds
Kingfishers
Pelicans
Chemistry and Materials
Makeup Science
Sugary Survival Skill
Gooey Secrets of Mussel Power
Computers
Galaxies far, far, far away
Middle school science adventures
Troubles with Hubble
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino-Dining Dinosaurs
Big Fish in Ancient Waters
Teeny Skull Reveals Ancient Ancestor
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Drilling Deep for Fuel
Hot Summers, Wild Fires
A Dire Shortage of Water
Environment
Missing Tigers in India
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Where rivers run uphill
Finding the Past
Salt and Early Civilization
Fakes in the museum
Watching deep-space fireworks
Fish
Electric Catfish
Bass
Catfish
Food and Nutrition
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
The Color of Health
GSAT English Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Capitalization Rules
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
It's a Math World for Animals
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Deep-space dancers
Human Body
Running with Sneaker Science
A Sour Taste in Your Mouth
A New Touch
Invertebrates
Mussels
Scallops
Bees
Mammals
Cougars
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Asiatic Bears
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
How children learn
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Gaining a Swift Lift
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Project Music
Plants
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Stalking Plants by Scent
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
Reptiles
Cobras
Caimans
Copperhead Snakes
Space and Astronomy
A Puffy Planetary Puzzle
Holes in Martian moon mystery
A Family in Space
Technology and Engineering
Reach for the Sky
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
Sugar Power for Cell Phones
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Noun
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Reach for the Sky
Where rivers run uphill
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Weather
A Change in Climate
Earth's Poles in Peril
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Add your Article

Scottish Folds

The Scottish Fold is a breed of cat with a natural mutation to its ears. The ear cartilage contains a fold so the ears bend forward and down toward the front of their head. Either/Or: Scottish Folds can be either long or short-haired, and they may have any coat color combination except for Siamese-style points. Pointed Folds have been bred but they are not eligible for showing. The original cats only had one fold in their ears, but due to selective breeding they have increased the fold to a double or triple crease that lies the ear totally flat against the head. Scottish Rose: The original Scottish Fold was a long-haired white-haired barn cat named Susie, who was found at a farm near Coupar Angus in Perthshire, Scotland in 1961. Susie's ears had an unusual fold in their middle, making her resemble an owl. When Susie had kittens, two of them were born with folded ears, and one of the siblings was acquired by William Ross, a neighboring farmer and cat-fancier. Ross registered the breed with the Governing Council of the Cat Fancy in Great Britain and started to breed Scottish Fold kittens with the help of geneticist Pat Turner. The breeding program produced 76 kittens in the first three years - 42 with folded ears and 34 with straight ears. The conclusion from this was that the ear mutation is due to a simple dominant gene. If one parent provides the gene for straight ears, and one parent provides the gene for folded ears, the kittens will be Folds. One Fold Too Many: The breed was not accepted for showing in Great Britain and Europe as it was felt that they would be extremely prone to ear problems such as infection, mites and deafness, but the folds were exported to America and the breed continued to be established there using crosses with British Shorthair and the American Shorthair. There is one medical problem that has been found to be related to Scottish Fold breeding. If both parents have folded ears, their kittens will be extremely prone to developing a painful degenerative joint disease that fuses the tail, ankles and knees. This condition also affects Scottish folds with one copy of the fold gene, to a lesser degree, and is the reason the breed is not accepted by the Governing Council of the Cat Fancy and the Fédération Internationale Féline.

Scottish Folds
Scottish Folds



Photo Gallery - Feline

Click here for Slideshow. You can also click on any of the photos to start slideshow.






Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™