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Watering the Air
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Earth-Friendly Fabrics
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Frogs and Toads
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Sea Lilies on the Run
Baboons Listen for Who's Tops
A Fallout Feast for Crabs
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When Darwin got sick of feathers
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Teeny Skull Reveals Ancient Ancestor
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
A Great Quake Coming?
Plastic-munching microbes
Life under Ice
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Where rivers run uphill
Nanosponges Soak Up Pollutants
Plastic Meals for Seals
Finding the Past
Fakes in the museum
Of Lice and Old Clothes
The Puzzle of Ancient Mariners
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Sturgeons
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Electric Ray
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The Color of Health
Yummy bugs
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GSAT English Rules
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Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
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GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
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GSAT Exam Preparation
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Detecting True Art
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
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Sun Screen
A New Touch
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Yaks
Asiatic Bears
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Children and Media
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The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Extra Strings for New Sounds
One ring around them all
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A Change in Leaf Color
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Reptiles
Box Turtles
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Cobras
Space and Astronomy
A Moon's Icy Spray
Asteroid Moons
A Whole Lot of Nothing
Technology and Engineering
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
What is a Verb?
Pronouns
Transportation
Flying the Hyper Skies
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Middle school science adventures
Weather
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Where rivers run uphill
Arctic Melt
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Saturn's Spongy Moon

Saturn has a lot going for it. The planet's spectacular rings are pretty cool. It has 31 moons, maybe more. Its largest moon, Titan, even has its own atmosphere. One of its smaller moons, Hyperion, looks like a potato and tumbles strangely as it orbits the planet. Now, the Cassini spacecraft, which is in orbit around Saturn, has taken the first close-up pictures of Hyperion. And the view is surprising. Hyperion is 266 kilometers (165 miles) across, and it has an irregular shape. Much of its inside is probably empty space. Scientists describe the moon as a "rubble pile." On Sept. 26, Cassini swooped to within 500 kilometers (310 miles) of the icy moon. The close-up images showed that Hyperion's surface is unlike that of any of the planet's other moons. They revealed a reddish surface dotted with craters and changed by some unknown process to give it a spongy look. Some Cassini researchers suspect that the spongelike appearance is a result of closely packed craters that were never filled in. Usually, when craters form, debris falls back into the holes. The gravity from nearby Titan, however, may have prevented that from happening.—E. Sohn

Saturn's Spongy Moon
Saturn's Spongy Moon








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