Agriculture
Springing forward
Watering the Air
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Amphibians
Salamanders
Salamanders and Newts
Newts
Animals
Saving Africa's Wild Dogs
Awake at Night
Sea Lilies on the Run
Behavior
Mind-reading Machine
Meet your mysterious relative
The case of the headless ant
Birds
Flightless Birds
Eagles
Robins
Chemistry and Materials
Pencil Thin
Sticking Around with Gecko Tape
Bang, Sparkle, Burst, and Boom
Computers
New twists for phantom limbs
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
Electronic Paper Turns a Page
Dinosaurs and Fossils
From Mammoth to Modern Elephant
Have shell, will travel
Fingerprinting Fossils
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Earth's Poles in Peril
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Environment
A Stormy History
Nanosponges Soak Up Pollutants
Giant snakes invading North America
Finding the Past
Decoding a Beverage Jar
Unearthing Ancient Astronomy
A Long Haul
Fish
White Tip Sharks
Tilapia
Skates and Rays
Food and Nutrition
A Taste for Cheese
Packing Fat
The mercury in that tuna
GSAT English Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Who vs. Whom
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Math Naturals
Human Body
Taste Messenger
Opening a Channel for Tasting Salt
Surviving Olympic Heat
Invertebrates
Sponges
Scallops
Walking Sticks
Mammals
Coyotes
Numbats
Polar Bear
Parents
How children learn
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
Electric Backpack
Gaining a Swift Lift
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Plants
Plants Travel Wind Highways
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Bright Blooms That Glow
Reptiles
Alligators
Asp
Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Super Star Cluster in the Neighborhood
Unveiling Titan
Asteroid Moons
Technology and Engineering
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Young Scientists Take Flight
A Clean Getaway
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Problems with Prepositions
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Robots on the Road, Again
Troubles with Hubble
Revving Up Green Machines
Weather
Watering the Air
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Add your Article

Salt and Early Civilization

Before salted fries came out of drive-through windows, before salty pretzels sat on the shelves of every grocery store, before there was a saltshaker on every dinner table, people had to go to a lot of trouble to get salt. Archaeologists have now uncovered the earliest strong evidence of salt production ever found. It suggests that large-scale salt making occurred at least 4,000 years ago in a settlement in central China. The new evidence comes out of the ruins at Zhongba, a settlement along the salty Ganjing River. Artifacts include pieces of vessels that were used to boil river water. Boiling salty water causes the water to evaporate, leaving behind cakes of salt. The oldest objects from Zhongba, dating back to between 2000 B.C. and 1750 B.C., include vats with pointy bottoms that were used to either store or boil salt water. From the period between 1630 B.C. and 1210 B.C., the researchers found lots of small cups with pointy bottoms. These were probably molds for making salt cones for trading. From the period between 1100 B.C. and 200 B.C., the archaeologists dug up small jars with round bottoms. People still use jars like this in some parts of the world to boil salt water and make salt cakes. Chemical analyses of the river water and of the soil in pits at Zhongba provide further evidence of salt making. Remains inside the round-bottomed jars seem to be calcium oxide, a chemical that forms during the salt-making process. There were also tiny traces of salt inside many of the vessels found at the site. Learning how to produce large amounts of salt helped the Chinese develop cities and build empires, the scientists say. Back when salt and salted foods were hard to come by, the crystal seasoning was worth a lot, and the Chinese traded it for other goods. Now that they have the technology to do it, archaeologists want to look for signs of salt making at even older sites in the Middle East. Even as nutritionists today warn that people are eating too much salt, the history of the seasoning has a lot to say about the development of cultures around the world.E. Sohn

Salt and Early Civilization
Salt and Early Civilization








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™