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Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Amphibians
Salamanders
Newts
Toads
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Cannibal Crickets
Jay Watch
How to Silence a Cricket
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Diving, Rolling, and Floating, Alligator Style
Body clocks
From dipping to fishing
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Seagulls
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A Meal Plan for Birds
Chemistry and Materials
Hitting the redo button on evolution
The science of disappearing
Supersonic Splash
Computers
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
A New Look at Saturn's rings
Supersonic Splash
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Big Fish in Ancient Waters
A Big, Weird Dino
Feathered Fossils
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Riding to Earth's Core
Coral Islands Survive a Tsunami
Springing forward
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Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
To Catch a Dragonfly
The Wolf and the Cow
Finding the Past
A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
Words of the Distant Past
Fish
Freshwater Fish
White Tip Sharks
Lungfish
Food and Nutrition
Symbols from the Stone Age
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
Sponges' secret weapon
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Who vs. Whom
Pronouns
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How to Slice a Cake Fairly
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
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Human Body
What the appendix is good for
Kids now getting 'adult' disease
Smiles Turn Away Colds
Invertebrates
Mosquitos
Sea Urchin
Bedbugs
Mammals
Pitbulls
Squirrels
Kodiak Bear
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
How children learn
Physics
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Road Bumps
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Plants
The algae invasion
A Giant Flower's New Family
Seeds of the Future
Reptiles
Boa Constrictors
Reptiles
Crocodiles
Space and Astronomy
Supernovas Shed Light on Dark Energy
Wrong-way planets do gymnastics
Big Galaxy Swallows Little Galaxy
Technology and Engineering
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
What is a Verb?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Robots on the Road, Again
Middle school science adventures
Where rivers run uphill
Weather
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Arctic Melt
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Salamanders

Salamander is the common name applied to approximately 500 amphibian vertebrates with slender bodies, short legs, and long tails (order Caudata or Urodela). The moist skin of the amphibians limits them to habitats either near water or under some protection on moist ground, usually in a forest. Salamanders superficially resemble lizards, but are easily distinguished by their lack of scales. Switching from swimming to walking, walking to swimming: Some species are aquatic throughout life, some take to the water intermittently, and some are entirely terrestrial as adults. Their ability to switch between swimming and walking makes them interesting animals to study the evolution of locomotion during vertebrate evolution. The two types of gaits have been studied using neuromechanical simulations. They are capable of regenerating lost limbs. The female members of the suborder Salamandroidea have cloacal glands in their cloacal chamber called spermathecae used to store sperm, as well as cloacal lips to pick up the male spermatophores. The suborders Cryptobranchoidea and Sirenoidea have external fertilization. The rigors of terrestrial life: Some salamanders retain their juvenile, gilled morphology but become sexually mature in a process called neoteny. The Axolotl, Ambystoma mexicanum, is a textbook example of a neotenic salamander, although there are many more neotenic species within the Ambystoma species complex. The juvenile form is retained to avoid the rigors of terrestrial life. Most tiny, some huge: Species of salamanders are numerous and found in most moist or aqueous habitats in the northern hemisphere. Most are small but some reach up to 5 feet in length. They live in brooks and ponds and other moist locations. North America has the hellbender and the mudpuppy which can reach the length of a foot or more. In Japan and China the giant salamander is found, which reaches 5 feet (1.5m) and weighs up to 30 kilograms]. Hanging in the Northern Hemisphere: Salamander habitat is generally restricted to mostly the northern hemisphere, with the exception of a few species living in the northernmost part of South America. Although common on the European mainland, salamanders are not a native species of either Great Britain or Ireland.

Salamanders
Salamanders








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