Agriculture
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Springing forward
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Bullfrogs
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
A Sense of Danger
Feeding School for Meerkats
No Fair: Monkey Sees, Doesn't
Behavior
Ear pain, weight gain
Listen and Learn
Taking a Spill for Science
Birds
A Meal Plan for Birds
Owls
Finches
Chemistry and Materials
Batteries built by Viruses
Undercover Detectives
Atom Hauler
Computers
Graphene's superstrength
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Nonstop Robot
Dinosaurs and Fossils
The bug that may have killed a dinosaur
A Dino King's Ancestor
Hall of Dinos
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Weird, new ant
Getting the dirt on carbon
Life under Ice
Environment
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
Sea Otters, Kelp, and Killer Whales
Nanosponges Soak Up Pollutants
Finding the Past
Of Lice and Old Clothes
Meet your mysterious relative
Salt and Early Civilization
Fish
Seahorses
Tiger Sharks
Tilapia
Food and Nutrition
Eat Out, Eat Smart
Packing Fat
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Capitalization Rules
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
Setting a Prime Number Record
Play for Science
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Human Body
Football Scrapes and Nasty Infections
Smiles Turn Away Colds
From Stem Cell to Any Cell
Invertebrates
Arachnids
Shrimps
Praying Mantis
Mammals
Dachshunds
Canines
Blue Bear
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Gaining a Swift Lift
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
IceCube Science
Plants
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Sweet, Sticky Science
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Reptiles
Copperhead Snakes
Garter Snakes
Cobras
Space and Astronomy
Return to Space
Mercury's magnetic twisters
Planning for Mars
Technology and Engineering
Weaving with Light
Searching for Alien Life
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Pronouns
Transportation
Robots on the Road, Again
Flying the Hyper Skies
Reach for the Sky
Weather
Earth's Poles in Peril
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
Arctic Melt
Add your Article

Roving the Red Planet

This little robot is a long way from home. Spirit, a remote-controlled rover with six chunky wheels, made its first outing on Mars last week. But Spirit has gotten into trouble. It lost contact with scientists back on Earth for a while and suffered various computer glitches. Although mission scientists are making repairs, they're not sure whether they can get Spirit back to full working order. Still, the rover did get some tasks done before malfunctioning. Spirit's landing site is in a large crater known as Gusev. Scientists suspect that the crater may have once held a massive lake. Spirit's job is to search for evidence of this lake in the crater's rocks and soil. The rover carries different types of tools for making these investigations, some of which are mounted on an extendable arm. Among the tools are two spectrometers—devices used to analyze the chemical makeup of an object or substance. Spirit first used its spectrometers to study rocks and soil just 3 meters from its landing site. It found that the soil is rich in the elements chlorine, sulfur, silicon, and iron. The soil's composition is similar to that of soil analyzed previously at three other Martian landing sites, says lead scientist Steve Squyres of Cornell University. Spirit also found the first traces of nickel and zinc on Mars. And it detected a mineral called olivine—usually found in volcanic rock on Earth. Scientists have long known that Mars is dotted with long-extinct volcanoes, such as the Olympus Mons, the largest volcano in the solar system. But the discovery of olivine also provides clues about the presence of water at the Gusev crater. Harry Y. McSween of the University of Tennessee says that olivine quickly changes into different compounds when water is present. Because there's still olivine at the Gusev crater, this could mean that there was never water at the site. Or it could be that the soil formed long after an ancient lake disappeared. Squyres believes that lake sediments exist somewhere deep in the crater's soil. He's just not sure how far down they may be. Mission scientists are working hard to fix Spirit. In the meantime, its sibling rover, Opportunity, is getting ready to wheel around on the opposite side of Mars—and taking some of the best pictures of Martian rock formations yet seen.—S. McDonagh

Roving the Red Planet
Roving the Red Planet








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™