Agriculture
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Making the most of a meal
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Amphibians
Toads
Salamanders and Newts
Frogs and Toads
Animals
Cannibal Crickets
Awake at Night
Tool Use Comes Naturally to Crows
Behavior
Baby Talk
Honeybees do the wave
Seeing red means danger ahead
Birds
Flamingos
Chicken
Woodpecker
Chemistry and Materials
When frog gender flips
Gooey Secrets of Mussel Power
Lighting goes digital
Computers
Programming with Alice
Batteries built by Viruses
Earth from the inside out
Dinosaurs and Fossils
An Ancient Feathered Biplane
Hall of Dinos
Dinosaurs Grow Up
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Challenging the Forces of Nature
Flower family knows its roots
Digging into a Tsunami Disaster
Environment
Lessons from a Lonely Tortoise
Forests as a Tsunami Shield
Pollution Detective
Finding the Past
Stone Tablet May Solve Maya Mystery
Your inner Neandertal
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
Fish
Manta Rays
Salmon
Trout
Food and Nutrition
The Color of Health
Building a Food Pyramid
Making good, brown fat
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Pronouns
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Scholarship
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
It's a Math World for Animals
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Setting a Prime Number Record
Human Body
Running with Sneaker Science
Gut Microbes and Weight
Don't Eat That Sandwich!
Invertebrates
Shrimps
Millipedes
Arachnids
Mammals
Quolls
Bonobos
Wolves
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
How children learn
Children and Media
Physics
Invisibility Ring
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Black Hole Journey
Plants
Making the most of a meal
Fast-flying fungal spores
A Giant Flower's New Family
Reptiles
Rattlesnakes
Reptiles
Snakes
Space and Astronomy
Roving the Red Planet
Sounds of Titan
A Moon's Icy Spray
Technology and Engineering
Shape Shifting
Beyond Bar Codes
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Charged cars that would charge
Middle school science adventures
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Weather
Arctic Melt
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Catching Some Rays
Add your Article

Roving the Red Planet

This little robot is a long way from home. Spirit, a remote-controlled rover with six chunky wheels, made its first outing on Mars last week. But Spirit has gotten into trouble. It lost contact with scientists back on Earth for a while and suffered various computer glitches. Although mission scientists are making repairs, they're not sure whether they can get Spirit back to full working order. Still, the rover did get some tasks done before malfunctioning. Spirit's landing site is in a large crater known as Gusev. Scientists suspect that the crater may have once held a massive lake. Spirit's job is to search for evidence of this lake in the crater's rocks and soil. The rover carries different types of tools for making these investigations, some of which are mounted on an extendable arm. Among the tools are two spectrometers—devices used to analyze the chemical makeup of an object or substance. Spirit first used its spectrometers to study rocks and soil just 3 meters from its landing site. It found that the soil is rich in the elements chlorine, sulfur, silicon, and iron. The soil's composition is similar to that of soil analyzed previously at three other Martian landing sites, says lead scientist Steve Squyres of Cornell University. Spirit also found the first traces of nickel and zinc on Mars. And it detected a mineral called olivine—usually found in volcanic rock on Earth. Scientists have long known that Mars is dotted with long-extinct volcanoes, such as the Olympus Mons, the largest volcano in the solar system. But the discovery of olivine also provides clues about the presence of water at the Gusev crater. Harry Y. McSween of the University of Tennessee says that olivine quickly changes into different compounds when water is present. Because there's still olivine at the Gusev crater, this could mean that there was never water at the site. Or it could be that the soil formed long after an ancient lake disappeared. Squyres believes that lake sediments exist somewhere deep in the crater's soil. He's just not sure how far down they may be. Mission scientists are working hard to fix Spirit. In the meantime, its sibling rover, Opportunity, is getting ready to wheel around on the opposite side of Mars—and taking some of the best pictures of Martian rock formations yet seen.—S. McDonagh

Roving the Red Planet
Roving the Red Planet








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™