Agriculture
Springing forward
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Got Milk? How?
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Salamanders and Newts
Newts
Animals
A Meal Plan for Birds
A Spider's Taste for Blood
Awake at Night
Behavior
Seeing red means danger ahead
Pondering the puzzling platypus
Mind-reading Machine
Birds
Kookaburras
Crows
Condors
Chemistry and Materials
Moon Crash, Splash
Nanomagnets Corral Oil
Scientist Profile: Wally Gilbert
Computers
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Batteries built by Viruses
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Fossil Fly from Antarctica
An Ancient Feathered Biplane
Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Plastic-munching microbes
Bugs with Gas
Digging into a Tsunami Disaster
Environment
Out in the Cold
Where rivers run uphill
Seabirds Deliver Arctic Pollutants
Finding the Past
Settling the Americas
Sahara Cemetery
A Big Discovery about Little People
Fish
Codfish
Electric Ray
Trout
Food and Nutrition
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
Eat Out, Eat Smart
The mercury in that tuna
GSAT English Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Capitalization Rules
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
Deep-space dancers
It's a Math World for Animals
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Human Body
A New Touch
Tapeworms and Drug Delivery
Foul Play?
Invertebrates
Clams
Crabs
Wasps
Mammals
Gray Whale
Tasmanian Devil
Yorkshire Terriers
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
How children learn
Physics
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Dreams of Floating in Space
Plants
Surprise Visitor
Stalking Plants by Scent
A Change in Leaf Color
Reptiles
Crocodiles
Anacondas
Copperhead Snakes
Space and Astronomy
Asteroid Lost and Found
Tossing Out a Black Hole Life Preserver
Saturn's New Moons
Technology and Engineering
Musclebots Take Some Steps
Beyond Bar Codes
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Pronouns
Transportation
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Robots on a Rocky Road
Flying the Hyper Skies
Weather
A Change in Climate
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Add your Article

Roving the Red Planet

This little robot is a long way from home. Spirit, a remote-controlled rover with six chunky wheels, made its first outing on Mars last week. But Spirit has gotten into trouble. It lost contact with scientists back on Earth for a while and suffered various computer glitches. Although mission scientists are making repairs, they're not sure whether they can get Spirit back to full working order. Still, the rover did get some tasks done before malfunctioning. Spirit's landing site is in a large crater known as Gusev. Scientists suspect that the crater may have once held a massive lake. Spirit's job is to search for evidence of this lake in the crater's rocks and soil. The rover carries different types of tools for making these investigations, some of which are mounted on an extendable arm. Among the tools are two spectrometers—devices used to analyze the chemical makeup of an object or substance. Spirit first used its spectrometers to study rocks and soil just 3 meters from its landing site. It found that the soil is rich in the elements chlorine, sulfur, silicon, and iron. The soil's composition is similar to that of soil analyzed previously at three other Martian landing sites, says lead scientist Steve Squyres of Cornell University. Spirit also found the first traces of nickel and zinc on Mars. And it detected a mineral called olivine—usually found in volcanic rock on Earth. Scientists have long known that Mars is dotted with long-extinct volcanoes, such as the Olympus Mons, the largest volcano in the solar system. But the discovery of olivine also provides clues about the presence of water at the Gusev crater. Harry Y. McSween of the University of Tennessee says that olivine quickly changes into different compounds when water is present. Because there's still olivine at the Gusev crater, this could mean that there was never water at the site. Or it could be that the soil formed long after an ancient lake disappeared. Squyres believes that lake sediments exist somewhere deep in the crater's soil. He's just not sure how far down they may be. Mission scientists are working hard to fix Spirit. In the meantime, its sibling rover, Opportunity, is getting ready to wheel around on the opposite side of Mars—and taking some of the best pictures of Martian rock formations yet seen.—S. McDonagh

Roving the Red Planet
Roving the Red Planet








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™